Sylette Henry-Buckmire

Sylette Henry-Buckmire
Stony Brook University | Stony Brook · School of Health Technology & Management

Doctor of Philosophy - Health and Rehabilitation Science, Disability Track Specialty

About

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Publication
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Introduction
I have a Ph.D in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Disability Studies track from Stony Brook University. This study is a feminist, ethnographic practice that takes a historicised look at disability formation, and is committed to disability, mobility, and occupational justice. It creates a space to discover a deeper, more textured understanding of how people move and occupy with physical disabilities. This project is important as it positions the PwD as a body-mind of value, worthy of a high quality of life experience, with equal life chances and opportunities on par with non-disabled persons. Mentor: Dr. Pam Block My research interests include: Disability studies, mobilities studies, occupational therapy, Caribbean studies, and feminist, postcolonial, and critical race theory.
Additional affiliations
January 2017 - May 2017
Stony Brook University
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2014 - May 2019
Stony Brook University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publication (1)
Article
Presents a review of the book, Making Computers Accessible: Disability Rights & Digital Technology (Petrick, E.R.; 2015). The author explores the relationship and history between computer technology and its impact on civil and disability rights. The book identifies the origins of assistive devices. In this context, assistive devices include any com...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
This project aims to interrogate, within the everyday lived experience, how power defines, facilitates and/or hinders the mobility (intended/desired movement) and occupation (doing) of physically disabled people.