Suzie M. Reichman

Suzie M. Reichman
RMIT University | RMIT · School of Engineering

32.87
 · 
Ph.D.
About
80
Research items
12,072
Reads
1,016
Citations
Introduction
I use soil chemistry, ecotoxicology and plant nutrition principles to solve knowledge gaps in the environmental risk assessment and remediation of contaminated land. My aim is to reduce the impacts of pollution on humans and the environment.
Research Experience
Jan 2018
RMIT University
Position
  • Associate Professor
Jan 2010 - Dec 2017
RMIT University
Position
  • Senior Lecturer
Feb 2008 - Feb 2010
Environment Protection Authority Victoria
Position
  • Research Portfolio Leader (Ecotoxicology and Chemistry) and Team Leader (Environmental Chemistry)
Education
Mar 1996 - Jul 2001
The University of Queensland
Field of study
  • Plant nutrition and Soil science
Mar 1991 - Jun 1995
The University of Queensland
Field of study
  • Environmental Science
Network
Cited By
Followers
Following
Projects
Projects (5)
Archived project
The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health – IJERPH (ISSN 1660-4601, IF 2.035) is currently running a Special Issue entitled "Soil Pollution and Remediation". There are multiple challenges associated with the remediation of polluted soil and new and innovative techniques have been used for this, including the use of soil amendments, thermal desorption, soil washing, electrokinetic remediation and bioremediation. This Special Issue welcomes articles on these and other themes relating to soil pollution and remediation. The submission deadline is 15 April 2018. You may send your manuscript now or up until the deadline. Submitted papers should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. We also encourage authors to send a short abstract or tentative title to the Editorial Office in advance. IJERPH is fully open access. Open access (unlimited and free access by readers) increases publicity and promotes more frequent citations, as indicated by several studies. Open access is supported by the authors and their institutes. An Article Processing Charge (APC) of CHF 1600 currently applies to all accepted papers. For further details about this special issue, please refer to http://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph/special_issues/soil_pollution_remediation If you have any questions, feel free to contact me at ada.wang@mdpi.com or ijerph@mdpi.com.
Research
Research items (73)
Article
Lead (Pb) is an important pollutant and is released into the environment in many forms. Different lead compounds have a variety of solubilities and so may impact on lead bioavailability and toxicity when added to soil. In this experimental study, we investigated the bioavailability of Pb in soil spiked with 300, 900 and 1500 mg/kg of Pb-acetate, Pb...
Article
The main factors related to Pb and Cd concentrations in vegetable garden soils from Melbourne Australia were house age, building material and distance from the nearest arterial road.
Article
The plant ionome is critical for growth, productivity, defense, and eventually affects our food quantity and quality. Located on the leaf surface, stomatal guard cells are critical gate-keepers of water, gas, and pathogen. As we enter an omics-driven systems biology era where understanding of guard cell function and physiology is being constantly a...
Article
Determination of how geogenic arsenic (As) and vanadium (V) is mobilised from naturally-enriched soils and iron (Fe) stones is integral for understanding the potential risk to the environment from changed land use conditions. Thus, the association of As, V and Fe in As-enriched sediments and Fe stones in Tertiary sediments of Melbourne, Australia,...
Article
River management continues to challenge riparian systems worldwide, with climate change impacts and anthropogenic extractions escalating. The Murray–Darling basin (MDB) in Australia is critical to agricultural production and habitat provision to maintain biodiversity. Concern for the condition of native trees and biota in the MDB has led to substan...
Article
Excess exposure to fluoride causes substantive health burden in humans and livestock globally. However, few studies have assessed the distribution and controls of variability of ambient background concentrations of fluoride in soil. Ambient background concentrations of fluoride in soil were collated for Greater Melbourne, Greater Geelong, Ballarat...
Article
Geochemical ratios between elements of environmental concern and Fe have been recommended for estimation of “background” concentrations of Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn in soil. However, little research has occurred to assess the consistency of geochemical ratios across soils developed in different environments. Broad application of generic geochemical ratios...
Article
Full-text available
Gardening and urban food production is an increasingly popular activity, which can improve physical and mental health and provide low cost nutritious food. However, the legacy of contamination from industrial and diffuse sources may have rendered surface soils in some urban gardens to have metals value in excess of recommended guidelines for agricu...
Article
There has been a global shift in environmental risk assessment towards quantifying ambient background concentrations of metals/metalloids in soil. Whilst bedrock has been shown to be a key driver of metal/metalloid variability in soil, few researchers have assessed controls of ambient background concentrations in soils of similar bedrock. A soil su...
Article
Currently, there are conflicting views on the best statistical methods for managing censored environmental data. The method commonly applied by environmental science researchers and professionals is to substitute half the limit of reporting for derivation of summary statistics. This approach has been criticised by some researchers, raising question...
Poster
Full-text available
Lead concentrations in urban soils, including residential gardens and recreational areas of Australia, have been reported above current human health criteria (300 mg/kg) (Laidlaw and Taylor, 2011, Laidlaw et al. 2017, Rouillon et al. 2017). However, although lead contamination is broadly reported, there is a lack of understanding of the key sources...
Article
Full-text available
Urban soils in many communities in the United States and internationally have been contaminated by lead (Pb) from past use of lead additives in gasoline, deterioration of exterior paint, emissions from Pb smelters and battery recycling and other industries. Exposure to Pb in soil and related dust is widespread in many inner city areas. Up to 20–40%...
Article
The surface chemistry and bulk chemical speciation of solid industrial wastes containing 8 wt-% antimony (Sb) were investigated using synchrotron X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Time-of-Flight Ion Secondary Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Leaching experiments were conducted in order to better understand the behavior of Sb in waste st...
Article
Understanding ambient background concentrations in soil, at a local scale, is an essential part of environmental risk assessment. Where high resolution geochemical soil surveys have not been undertaken, soil data from alternative sources, such as environmental site assessment reports, can be used to support an understanding of ambient background co...
Article
Clean-up of contaminated soils is a costly and slow process that requires long periods of time to be effective. Therefore, direct use of contaminated sites with appropriate management is often likely to be a more efficient use of such land. Consequently, the production of safe animal forages from contaminated soils was the aim of this research. Fie...
Chapter
Over centuries, industrial, mining and military activities, agriculture, farming, and waste practices have contaminated soils and wetlands in many countries with high concentrations of toxic metals. In addition to their negative effects on ecosystems and other natural resources, toxic metals pose a great danger to human health. Unlike organic compo...
Article
Concentrations of vehicular emitted heavy metals in roadside soils result in long term environmental damage. This study assessed the relationships between traffic characteristics (traffic density, road age and vehicular speed) and roadside soil heavy metals. Significant levels were recorded for Cd (0.06–0.59 mg/kg), Cr (18–29 mg/kg), Cu (4–12 mg/kg...
Article
Full-text available
Around the globe, heavy industry has often been associated with estuaries, which provide water for operations, waste disposal and navigation. Many of these practices leave a legacy of contamination, which accumulate in the estuaries, which act as sediment sinks. Heavy metal contaminants may remain buried, even after the industrial practices are cea...
Article
Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain CB1809 was recently identified as a plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria in high arsenic substrate. However, it is not known if B. japonicum has growth promoting properties in plant species other than its leguminous host or the bacterium's tolerance to arsenic and metals. Solution culture was used to test the respons...
Article
Rice is an important route of arsenic (As) exposure to human, especially the populations with rice-based diets. Human health risk of As varies greatly with rice variety and country of origin. The purpose of the present study was to determine total and speciated As in Australian grown and imported rice on sale in Australia to assess their health ris...
Article
The stabilization of sulphidic wastes produced by underground gold mining is challenging because these materials are often structureless, saline and contain elevated levels of toxic metalloids. A glasshouse study was conducted to test a milled benign waste rock and topsoil. The test species were, Bothriochloa macra (Steud) S.T. Blake and Enteropogo...
Article
Dietary exposure to heavy metals is a matter of concern for human health risk through the consumption of rice, vegetables and other major foodstuffs. In the present study, we investigated concentrations of cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in Australian grown and imported ri...
Article
Full-text available
The use of Cu-based fungicide can pose a risk to nearby surface water bodies due to the run-off of accumulated Cu from agricultural soils. In 2008, we conducted a reconnaissance survey of the presence and concentration of copper in sediments at 18 sites within the Yarra River Catchment, an important horticultural production system in south-eastern...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term exposure to elevated copper (Cu) concentrations may affect the ability of soil microbes to withstand additional transient disturbances, such as heat. Bulk surface soil samples collected from three south east Australian locations were spiked with a series of Cu concentrations ranging from 0 to 1,000 mg/kg. To determine the effect of increa...
Article
Full-text available
There are concerns over the environmental risks posed by Cu-based fungicide use, and there is community and regulatory pressure on viticultural industries to restrict the use of Cu-based fungicides. This study assesses the relative environmental risks posed by Cu-based and alternative synthetic organic fungicide compounds used in Australian vineyar...
Article
Full-text available
There is increasing community awareness of the potential environmental risks posed by Cu-based fungicide use, which is placing increasing pressure on governments and industry to undertake risk minimisation action. However, if there is going to be a widespread move away from the use of Cu-based fungicides, logically there needs to be assurance that...
Article
Interest in recycling greywaters is increasing as population growth, pollution and climate change increase pressure on water resources. There has been little research investigating impacts of irrigating untreated greywater on soil and plant health and to our knowledge no studies comparing greywater from standard with “low environmental impact” dete...
Article
Full-text available
The use of copper-based fungicides leads to an accumulation of copper (Cu) in vineyard soils, potentially causing adverse effects to the microbial function and fertility of the soil. This study used a soil microcosm approach to assess the effects of Cu accumulation on microbial function in vineyard soils. Surface soil samples were collected from 10...
Article
A 24-month field lysimeter experiment using ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) grown in three soil types was used to investigate metal bioavailability dynamics following amendment with biosolids and metal salts (Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn). Common surrogates of soil metal bioavailability (total soil metal, EDTA, Ca(NO3)2, total dissolved, diffusive gradient in thin...
Article
This paper questions whether the presence of biosolids amendment in metal-spiked soils alters the outcome of soil-based assays of metal bioavailability. The effects of biosolids amendment on the efficacies of six soil metal bioavailability assays (total recoverable, EDTA, Ca(NO3)2, soil solution, diffusive gradient in thin films and free ion activi...
Article
A 24-month field lysimeter experiment using ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) grown in three soil types was used to investigate metal bioavailability dynamics following amendment with biosolids and metal salts (Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn). Common surrogates of soil metal bioavailability (total soil metal, EDTA, Ca(NO3)(2), total dissolved, diffusive gradient in thi...
Article
Full-text available
Fungicides are regularly applied in horticultural production systems and may migrate off-site, potentially posing an ecological risk to surface waterways. However, few studies have investigated the fate of fungicides in horticultural catchments. This study investigated the presence of 24 fungicides at 18 sites during a 5-month period within a horti...
Article
Cations, such as Ca and Mg, are generally thought to alleviate toxicities of trace metals through site-specific competition (as incorporated in the biotic ligand model, BLM). Short-term experiments were conducted with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) seedlings in simple nutrient solutions to examine the alleviation of Cu and Pb toxicities by Al,...
Article
• Reductions in plant growth as a result of salinity are of global importance in natural and agricultural landscapes. • Short-term (48-h) solution culture experiments studied 404 treatments with seedlings of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata cv Caloona) to examine the multiple deleterious effects of calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na) or potassium (K...
Article
Few studies have quantified the accuracy of soil metal bioavailability assays using large datasets. A meta-analysis from experiments spanning 6 months to 13 years on 12 soil types, compared bioavailability estimate efficiencies for wheat and ryegrass. Treatments included biosolids ± metals, comparing total metal, Ca(NO₃)₂, EDTA, soil solution, DGT...
Conference Paper
A greater understanding of rhizosphere biogeochemistry is likely to improve our understanding of the factors that drive bioavailability of heavy metals in growth substrates. A glasshouse study was conducted that investigated the impacts of three growth substrates (topsoil, oxidised mining waste and unoxidised mining waste) and four species of New Z...
Article
Full-text available
Three contrasting soils were collected from the Canterbury region in New Zealand and treated with a one-off application of Cd (1, 5 and 10 mg/kg applied as sulphate), in the presence and absence of biosolids applied at a rate equivalent to 400 kg N/ha. Soils were then incubated for two weeks and 24 weeks at a constant temperature of 25 ± 2 °C in th...
Article
This study determined the environmental availability of copper (Cu) in Australian vineyard soils contaminated with fungicide derived Cu residues, and investigated the soil characteristics correlated with differences in Cu availability between regions. Concentrations of 0.01 M calcium chloride extractable Cu, measured in surface soils collected from...
Article
Full-text available
The leading hypothesis for the evolution of the metal hyperaccumulation trait in plants is as a defense against herbivores. A central piece of evidence expected for this hypothesis is that plants benefit from herbivores being deterred from eating high metal tissues. While many studies have investigated whether or not herbivores are deterred by high...
Article
The application of biosolids to land is increasing because it provides an alternative means of waste disposal and benefits the soil via improved .soil fertility and productivity. However, the metals present in biosolids are potential concerns for environmental and public health, arising from the possibility of metal accumulation in soils and their...
Article
The phytoextraction of gold is an exciting new area of research involving the use of plants to extract gold from a low grade ore and waste products. The aim of this study was to screen some Australian native plant species and exotic agricultural species for their potential use in cyanide-induced phytoextraction of gold from a crushed ore body. Plan...
Article
Full-text available
Dormancy-breaking treatments are applied to seeds of many Australian species used for mine-site restoration in arid and semi-arid regions of Australia. Once seeds are sown, several months may pass before a rain event sufficient for germination. Therefore, it is important that treated seeds are able to survive in soil until conditions are hospitable...
Article
The sustainable remediation of arsenic (As) contaminated sites requires an understanding of how As alters the biogeochemical processes in soil. Leguminous species are often used in the remediation of contaminated sites because of their capacity to fix nitrogen and enhance site fertility. While excess As is known to reduce the formation of root nodu...
Article
* The existing literature is ambiguous as to whether the diurnal pulse in phytosiderophore (PS) release in the Poaceae is mediated by light or temperature, or both. * Here, wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Yecora Rojo) seedlings were grown in Fe-sufficient (pFe = 16.5) and Fe-deficient (pFe = 17.8) chelator-buffered nutrient solutions. Six different li...
Article
Indirect assays are commonly used to measure phytosiderophore (PS) concentrations in the root exudates of grasses. The Cu-mobilizing, Cu-CAS and Fe-binding assays are three commonly used assays but there have been few published attempts to validate or calibrate them rigorously. Thus, we undertook to compare, validate and, where appropriate, to impr...
Article
Full-text available
Acacia harpophylla F. Muell. (brigalow) used to naturally occur over a range of about 50 000 km(2) in Queensland and New South Wales, Australia. Large scale clearing for agriculture has reduced the area to less than 20 000 km(2) and it is estimated that 20-25% of vertebrate fauna living in brigalow communities will become locally extinct as a resul...
Article
In Australia, metal-contaminated sites, including those with elevated levels of copper (Cu), are frequently revegetated with endemic plants. Little is known about the responses of Australian plants to excess Cu. Acacia holosericea, Eucalyptus crebra, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, and Melaleuca leucadendra were grown in solution culture with six Cu trea...
Chapter
Phytosiderophores (PS) are Fe (Ill)-solubilizing compounds released from the roots of Poaceae. Although still poorly quantified, the available evidence suggests that concentrations of PS in the rhizosphere are between a few and 100 μm. Daily cycles of PS in the rhizosphere occur with inputs from plants roots in the morning, the majority of PS being...
Article
Little is known about the responses of Australian plants to excess metal, including Mn. It is important to remedy this lack of information so that knowledgeable decisions can be made about managing Mn contaminated sites where inhabited by Australian vegetation. Acacia holosericea, Melaleuca leucadendra, Eucalyptus crebra and Eucalyptus camaldulensi...
Chapter
Metal mining frequently results in substrates for rehabilitation which have elevated levels of metals. In Australia, the objective of many rehabilitation programs is to re-establish native plant communities, and yet, very little is known of the responses of Australian plants to elevated levels of metals. Eucalyptus camaldulensis (river red gum) has...
Book
Full-text available
Metal contamination issues are becoming increasingly common in Australia and elsewhere, with many documented cases of metal toxicity including in mining and agriculture. Metals are a natural part of terrestrial systems occurring in soil, rock, air, water and organisms. A few metals, including Cu, Mn and Zn, are however essential to plant metabolism...
Thesis
Metal contamination issues are becoming increasingly common in Australia and elsewhere, with many documented cases of metal toxicity including in mining and agriculture. Metals are a natural part of terrestrial systems occurring in soil, rock, air, water and organisms. A few metals, including Cu, Mn and Zn, are essential to plant metabolism in trac...
Article
Full-text available
A frequently desired outcome when rehabilitating Zn toxic sites in Australia is to establish a self-sustaining native ecosystem. Hence, it is important to understand the tolerance of Australian native plants to high concentrations of Zn. Very little is known about the responses of Australian native plants, and trees in particular, to toxic concentr...
Chapter
Greenhouse experiments were conducted in which five native Australian tree species were grown in soil spiked with copper, zinc, and manganese. The pots were equipped with samplers that allowed regular collection of the soil solution. The primary aim was to determine the critical concentration of each metal in soil solution that caused symptoms of t...