Suzanne M Egan

Suzanne M Egan
Mary Immaculate College University of Limerick

PhD (Trinity College Dublin)

About

41
Publications
32,823
Reads
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255
Citations
Citations since 2016
32 Research Items
206 Citations
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Introduction
Main research interests lie in the areas of social cognition and cognitive development, particularly examining the processes and factors involved in imagination, thinking and reasoning both in adults and young children.
Additional affiliations
September 2004 - present
Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
September 2001 - October 2004
Trinity College Dublin
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Full-text available
Over the last decade, Forest School (FS) has become a more common part of the educational landscape both in Ireland and in the UK. This paper aims to provide a timely review of research related to FS and begins by situating FS in the broader context of nature-based education and play, before outlining the defining principles and features of FS. The...
Article
Full-text available
Although it is well established that reading with young children supports early language and literacy development, few studies have focused on the importance of parental beliefs about reading with infants. The current study, which sheds light on parental beliefs had three main aims. The first was to examine practices of shared reading in infancy (b...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to examine the role of different types of home learning activities, such as reading, singing, painting, playing games, and letters and numbers (ABCs and 123 s), in the development of nonverbal reasoning skills in young children. Although much previous research has focused on the role of the home learning environment in the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although it is well established that reading with young children supports early language and literacy development, few studies have focused on the importance of parental beliefs about reading with infants. The current study, which sheds light on parental beliefs had three main aims. The first was to examine practices of shared reading in infancy (b...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter explores the role of outdoor play in childhood from a multisystem perspective, adopting Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological framework (1979). There are many factors that influence children’s capacity to play outdoors and this chapter will consider these factors, situating them within Bronfenbrenner’s systems while drawing on specific exampl...
Chapter
Drawing on examples from research and practice, this chapter will explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) from a multisystem perspective of Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological framework. The chapter will discuss key factors that influence children’s early education and care as well as consider how the phy...
Preprint
Full-text available
Drawing on examples from research and practice this chapter will explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) from a multisystem perspective, adopting Bronfenbrenner's bioecological framework. The chapter will discuss key factors that influence children's early education and care, considering how the phys...
Chapter
Full-text available
Play in the home environment is important for cognitive and socio-emotional development in early childhood. Children’s home environments are made up of multiple play activities (e.g., toys, books, screen time, outdoor play) and are influenced by multiple factors (e.g., availability of resources, parenting behaviours, parental attitudes to play, soc...
Book
Full-text available
This collection brings together various cutting-edge and accessible perspectives and insights into the rich, complex and intriguing stage of life that is childhood. Contributions here relate specifically to the Irish context, with many seamless connections also made to the universal themes of childhood and their relevance within the international c...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter provides insight into a pilot book-gifting scheme for babies in areas of socio-economic disadvantage in Ireland. It reviews the benefits of the scheme, and considers the lessons learned from the Bookseed scheme. The chapter highlights the potential of a book gifting scheme to greater equality of access to reading opportunities at a you...
Article
Full-text available
This article provides a brief description of the Play and Learning in the Early Years (PLEY) Study. This parental report survey explored the impact of the COVID-19 restrictions on young children aged 1-10 years during lockdown in Ireland during May and June 2020. The findings showed that most children’s play, learning, relationships and emotional d...
Article
Full-text available
Worldwide, millions of children have missed out on early childhood education and care (ECEC) due to the closure of their settings during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, little is known about the socio-emotional impact of these closures on young children. This paper draws upon a study of 506 parents of children aged 1–10 years in Ireland who complet...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of the current study was to investigate how children in Ireland adapted to the change in schooling, and particularly their use of screen devices to support their learning at home, during a period of lockdown due to the COVID-19 crisis in early 2020. This research draws on data from 506 parents of children aged 1–10 years in Ireland who comp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Play is observed across all cultures and is a fundamental activity in children's lives, essential to cognitive and socio-emotional development. However, children’s lives, including their opportunities for play, were severely disrupted in early 2020 by the COVID-19 crisis. The aims of the current study were to investigate how the pandemic may have i...
Preprint
Full-text available
Worldwide, millions of children have missed out on early childhood education and care (ECEC) due to the closure of their settings during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, little is known about the socio-emotional impact of these closures on young children. This paper draws upon a study of 506 parents of children aged 1-10 years in Ireland who complet...
Article
Full-text available
Much of the research on screen time to date has focused on TV watching and the amount of time spent on screens. However, due to the high level of variation in current screen activities in relation to features, parental scaffolding opportunities, portability, and interactivity (e.g., tv, smartphones, tablets) it is no longer possible to consider the...
Research
Full-text available
Play - Impact of COVID19 Restrictions on Young Children's Play, Learning and Development: Key Findings from the Play and Learning in the Early Years (PLEY) Survey - Play Infographic
Research
Full-text available
Many children’s lives have changed dramatically in recent months due to the COVID-19 crisis. An online survey of parents of children aged 0-10 years was used to explore how these changes have affected children’s play, learning and development. The survey measured play activities at home, the factors that influence it and the impact of some of the r...
Preprint
Full-text available
Impact of COVID-19 Restrictions on Young Children's Play, Learning & Development: Preliminary Findings from the Play and Learning in the Early Years (PLEY) Survey. Sample: 512 parents of children aged 1-10, mainly based in Ireland. Data collection: Online survey between May 21st and June 3rd 2020. Data analysis: Ongoing.
Research
Full-text available
Many children’s lives have changed dramatically in recent months due to the COVID-19 crisis. An online survey of parents of children aged 0-10 years was used to explore how these changes have affected children’s play, learning and development. The survey measured play activities at home, the factors that influence it and the impact of some of the r...
Article
Full-text available
Family and home environment factors have been outlined in previous literature as important variables that affect early reasoning development. However, little research has focused on the association between screen use in the home environment and nonverbal reasoning ability. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to examine the role of both screen...
Chapter
Full-text available
The goal of this chapter is to introduce you to the psychological research and theories regarding memory and imagination. We’ll begin by discussing what memory is, why it is important and some findings from early studies on memory. Following that we’ll move on to describe some of the structures and processes of memory and different theoretical appr...
Article
Full-text available
With screen use becoming more prevalent at a younger age, it is important to research the possible impact screen use has on early cognitive development. The current study examines the screen use of 9001 5-year-olds and their reasoning abilities, using data from the Growing Up in Ireland study. Results show that both the amount of daily screen time,...
Article
Full-text available
Reading books with infants has many positive associations with child development. However, the age at which parents begin reading with their infants, and the frequency that they read with them, is affected by many factors. This paper considers some of those factors and examines the role baby book gifting programmes may play in supporting early shar...
Article
Full-text available
Reading is a basic cultural skill and important for success in life. The first aim of this article is to review research examining the factors that support early shared reading experiences and the developmental benefits of this activity in early childhood, drawing on international research in the first two sections of this paper. While internationa...
Article
Full-text available
This paper highlights the wealth of quantitative research evidence available to inform practice during early childhood in Ireland. The first section of this paper discusses the importance of evidence based practice for any discipline, distinguishes it from developmentally appropriate practice in early childhood and considers an ecological systems p...
Poster
Full-text available
Title: Things Could Have Been Worse: The Counterfactual Nature of Gratitude. This research investigates what role different types of counterfactual thinking play in gratitude. Experiment 1 investigates if levels of gratitude are associated with the generation of both upward counterfactuals (things could have been better) and downward counterfactua...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Counterfactual thinking, which contrasts a real event with a hypothetical scenario, is a fundamental characteristic of healthy social, emotional and cognitive functioning, and frequently triggers affective reactions. The aim of this research is to investigate what role, if any, different types of counterfac-tual thinking play in gratitude. Experime...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of the current research is to draw on the Growing Up in Ireland data to provide a snapshot of outdoor play in Irish 5 year olds. The Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) study is a longitudinal, nationally representative study of young children in Ireland. Data were collected on a sample of 9001 children, as part of the GUI study, when the children...
Article
Full-text available
Screen time has long been of interest to psychologists, parents, and those working with young children. However, what “screen time” is has changed since the introduction of touchscreen devices over the last decade. Therefore, it is important to differentiate between screen time and the type of activity (e.g., television, video games, educational ga...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the role of autonomy in counterfactual thinking in two experiments. Autonomy emphasises intrinsic motivation and reduced preoccupation with external outcomes. Experiment 1 demonstrated that autonomy influences both the number and content of counterfactual thoughts, particularly for individuals performing a task rather than reading a...
Article
Previous research on counterfactual thoughts about prevention suggests that people tend to focus on enabling rather than causing events and controllable rather than uncontrollable events. Two experiments explore whether counterfactual thinking about enablers is distinct from counterfactual thinking about controllable events. We presented participan...
Article
Full-text available
This study uses a nationally representative sample of 9-month-old infants and their families from the Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) study to investigate if reading to infants is associated with higher scores on contemporaneous indicators of cognitive development independently of other languagebased interactions between parent and infant, such as show...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research on counterfactual thoughts about prevention suggests that people tend to focus on enabling rather than causing agents. However, research has also demonstrated that people have a preference for mutating controllable events. We explore whether counterfactual thinking about enablers is distinct from 'undoing' controllable events. We...
Article
Full-text available
We examine how people understand and reason from counterfactual threats, for example, "if you had hit your sister, I would have grounded you" and counterfactual promises, for example, "if you had tidied your room, I would have given you ice-cream." The first experiment shows that people consider counterfactual threats, but not counterfactual promis...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to explore why people focus on enablers rather than causes in their counterfactual thinking (i.e., how people undo the past). We report the results of an experiment that compared causes and enablers in likelihood and the number of available alternatives. The results indicate that the number of alternatives may explain the...
Article
We report three experiments to test the possibilities reasoners think about when they understand a conditional of the form 'A only if B' compared to 'if A then B'. The experiments examine conditionals in the indicative mood (e.g., A occurred only if B occurred) and counterfactuals in the subjunctive mood (A would have occurred only if B had occurre...
Article
Full-text available
We consider reasoning about prefactual possibilities in the future, for example, "if I were to win the lottery next year I would buy a yacht" and counterfactual possibilities, for example, "if I had won the lottery last year, I would have bought a yacht." People may reason about indicative conditionals, for example, "if I won the lottery I bought a...

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Projects (2)
Project
The aim of my research is to investigate the relationship between counterfactual thinking and state and trait gratitude, while also examining the potential mediating effects of other factors known to be associated with counterfactual thinking and gratitude such as happiness, satisfaction with life, and blame.