Suzan Benedick

Suzan Benedick
Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS) | ums · Faculty of Sustainable Agriculture

Dip.,BSc.,MSc.,PhD.,Post Doc.

About

49
Publications
26,625
Reads
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2,703
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2011 - present
Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS)
Position
  • Moth assemblages in tropical rain forest and oil palm plantation in Sabah, Borneo
Description
  • Impact of forest fragmentation on Tropical Moths Assemblages (Funded by Nagao Natural Environment Foundation (NEF)
January 2009 - December 2009
Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS)
Position
  • Preliminary survey of green leafhoppers (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Nepotettix spp.) a rice tungro disease vector in Kota Belud, Sabah, Malaysia
Description
  • Preliminary survey of green leafhoppers (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Nepotettix spp.) a rice tungro disease vector in Kota Belud, Sabah, Malaysia (Funded by UMS Seed Money: Jan 2009-Dec 2009)
November 2007 - present
Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS)
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Currently teaching Agricultural Ecology, Agricultural Entomology and Crop Pest Management
Education
November 2005 - October 2007
University of York, UK
Field of study
  • Entomology
June 2002 - September 2005
Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS)
Field of study
  • Biological Conservation (Entomology)
October 1999 - October 2001
Durham University
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences (Entomology)

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
Full-text available
The mortality of a few trees leads to the emergence of palm gaps or unproductive areas in oil palm plantations. These areas offer the potential for integrating a secondary crop, such as, the Cavendish banana (Musa acuminata Colla). This banana is a well-established clonally propagated variety which is well known to local planters, but to date, litt...
Article
Full-text available
Island biogeography is one of the most powerful subdisciplines of ecology: its mathematical predictions that island size and distance to mainland determine diversity have withstood the test of time. A key question is whether these predictions follow at a population-genomic level. Using rigorous ancient-DNA protocols, we retrieved ∼1000 genomic mark...
Article
Widespread selective logging in tropical forest causes structural damage and associated shifts in species composition, but we lack understanding of how selective logging impacts mechanistic processes that drive these biodiversity changes. Movement is a vital mechanistic process underpinning demographic, ecological, and evolutionary processes that l...
Article
Tropical forest degradation affects host-parasite interactions, determining the probability of animals acquiring an infection. The activation of an immune response to fight off infections requires energy and other resources such as antioxidants which may be redirected from growth and reproduction. A key question is how selective logging—the most co...
Article
Selective logging is the main anthropogenic disturbance in tropical forests, driving shifts in species abundances. Body size and body condition are important metrics of fitness that may be affected by habitat degradation. We conducted a four-year study to investigate how selective logging impacted the body size and body condition index (BCI) of 55...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing the domestic production of Brassica vegetables is important to sustain the local food supply, maintain the healthy diets of the population, reduce the country's foreign exchange, and improve the local economy. In this study, a column hydroponic system (CHS) of 1.2 m L  1.2 m W  1.5 m H was built and tested to increase Brassica vegetabl...
Article
Full-text available
The tropical rainforests of Sundaland are a global biodiversity hotspot increasingly threatened by human activities. While parasitic insects are an important component of the ecosystem, their diversity and parasite-host relations are poorly understood in the tropics. We investigated parasites of passerine birds, the chewing lice of the speciose gen...
Article
Quaternary climate oscillations are a well‐known driver of animal diversification, but their effects are most well studied in areas where glaciations lead to habitat fragmentation. In large areas of the planet, however, glaciations have had the opposite effect, but here their impacts are much less well understood. This is especially true in Southea...
Article
Selective logging is the dominant form of human disturbance in tropical forests, driving changes in the abundance of vertebrate and invertebrate populations relative to undisturbed old‐growth forests. A key unresolved question is understanding which physiological mechanisms underlie different responses of species and functional groups to selective...
Article
Full-text available
Maintaining forest conservation set-asides is a key criterion of sustainability certification of many crops that drive tropical deforestation, but their value for carbon storage and associated biodiversity is unclear. We conducted vegetation measurements to examine the benefits of set-asides for aboveground carbon stocks (AGC) in certified oil palm...
Article
1. Selective logging is a major driver of environmental changes in the tropics. Recently, there has been increasing interest in understanding which traits make bird species resilient or vulnerable to such changes. Physiological stress mediated by the steroid hormone corticosterone (CORT) might underlie changes in local abundance of species because...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat fragmentation is a major extinction driver. Despite dramatically increasing fragmentation across the globe, its specific impacts on population connectivity across species with differing life histories remain difficult to characterize, let alone quantify. Here we investigate patterns of population connectivity in six songbird species from Si...
Article
Full-text available
Aim To examine plant community composition within rain forest remnants, and whether communities in different fragments follow similar trajectories of change in composition. We investigate whether plant communities in rain forest fragments either diverge from, or become more similar to, plant communities in other fragments, in order to understand th...
Article
en Rain forests on Borneo support exceptional concentrations of endemic insect biodiversity, but many of these forest‐dependent species are threatened by land‐use change. Totally protected areas (TPA s) of forest are key for conserving biodiversity, and we examined the effectiveness of the current TPA network for conserving range‐restricted butterf...
Article
Full-text available
Remnants of lowland rain forest remain following deforestation, but the longer-term effects of fragmentation remain poorly understood, partly due to the long generation times of trees. We study rain forest trees in three size classes: seedlings (<1 cm dbh), saplings (1–5 cm dbh), and trees (>5 cm) that broadly reflect pre- and post-fragmentation co...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical rainforests are subject to extensive degradation by commercial selective logging. Despite pervasive changes to forest structure, selectively logged forests represent vital refugia for global biodiversity. The ability of these forests to buffer temperature-sensitive species from climate warming will be an important determinant of their futu...
Article
Full-text available
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Data
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Article
Full-text available
Fragmentation of natural habitats can be detrimental for species if individuals fail to cross habitat boundaries to reach new locations, thereby reducing functional connectivity. Connectivity is crucial for species shifting their ranges under climate change, making it important to understand factors that might prevent movement through human-modifie...
Technical Report
A dataset of 3,250,404 measurements, collated from 26,114 sampling locations in 94 countries and representing 47,044 species. The data were collated from 480 existing spatial comparisons of local-scale biodiversity exposed to different intensities and types of anthropogenic pressures, from terrestrial sites around the world. The database was assemb...
Article
Full-text available
Selective logging is one of the major drivers of tropical forest degradation, causing important shifts in species composition. Whether such changes modify interactions between species and the networks in which they are embedded remain fundamental questions to assess the ‘health’ and ecosystem functionality of logged forests. We focus on interaction...
Article
Full-text available
Malaria cases caused by Plasmodium knowlesi, a simian parasite naturally found in long-tailed and pig-tailed macaques, are increasing rapidly in Sabah, Malaysia. One hypothesis is that this increase is associated with changes in land use. A study was carried out to identify the anopheline vectors present in different forest types and to observe the...
Article
Full-text available
Invertebrates are dominant species in primary tropical rainforests, where their abundance and diversity contributes to the functioning and resilience of these globally important ecosystems. However, more than one-third of tropical forests have been logged, with dramatic impacts on rainforest biodiversity that may disrupt key ecosystem processes. We...
Article
Full-text available
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Article
Strong global demand for tropical timber and agricultural products has driven large-scale logging and subsequent conversion of tropical forests. Given that the majority of tropical landscapes have been or will likely be logged, the protection of biodiversity within tropical forests thus depends on whether species can persist in these economically e...
Article
In view of the rapid rate of expansion of agriculture in tropical regions, attention has focused on the potential for privately-managed rainforest patches within agricultural land to contribute to biodiversity conservation. However, these sites generally differ in their history of forest disturbance and management compared with other forest fragmen...
Article
Full-text available
Forests in Southeast Asia are rapidly being logged and converted to oil palm. These changes in land-use are known to affect species diversity but consequences for the functional diversity of species assemblages are poorly understood. Environmental filtering of species with similar traits could lead to disproportionate reductions in trait diversity...
Data
Functional dissimilarity measured as the overlap of species within functional space. Species are plotted within four-dimensional functional trait space. (a) Axes 1 and 2: primary and twice-logged forest (light grey), once-logged forest (mid-grey) and oil palm (dark grey), and (b) Axes 3 and 4: primary, once-logged and twice-logged forest (light gre...
Article
Effects of logging on species composition in tropical rainforests are well known but may fail to reveal key changes in species interactions. We used nitrogen stable-isotope analysis of 73 species of understory birds to quantify trophic responses to repeated intensive logging of rainforest in northern Borneo and to test 4 hypotheses: logging has sig...
Article
Full-text available
To manage and conserve biodiversity, one must know what is being lost, where, and why, as well as which remedies are likely to be most effective. Metabarcoding technology can characterise the species compositions of mass samples of eukaryotes or of environmental DNA. Here, we validate metabarcoding by testing it against three high-quality standard...
Article
Effects of logging on species composition in tropical rainforests are well known but may fail to reveal key changes in species interactions. We used nitrogen stable-isotope analysis of 73 species of understory birds to quantify trophic responses to repeated intensive logging of rainforest in northern Borneo and to test 4 hypotheses: logging has sig...
Article
A key driver of rain forest degradation is rampant commercial logging. Reduced-impact logging (RIL) techniques dramatically reduce residual damage to vegetation and soils, and they enhance the long-term economic viability of timber operations when compared to conventionally managed logging enterprises. Consequently, the application of RIL is increa...
Article
Full-text available
see paper: Reliable, verifiable, and efficient monitoring of biodiversity via metabarcoding To manage and conserve biodiversity, one must know what is being lost, where, and why, as well as which remedies are likely to be most effective. However, the great difficulty of quantifying biodiversity poses a serious roadblock to the development of effec...
Article
Full-text available
Large areas of tropical forest now exist as remnants scattered across agricultural landscapes, and so understanding the impacts of forest fragmentation is important for biodiversity conservation. We examined species richness and nestedness among tropical forest remnants in birds (meta-analysis of published studies) and insects (field data for fruit...
Article
Aim To estimate whether species have shifted at equal rates at their leading edges (cool boundaries) and trailing edges (warm boundaries) in response to climate change. We provide the first such evidence for tropical insects, here examining elevation shifts for the upper and lower boundaries shifts of montane moths. Threats to species on tropical m...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods Species range boundaries changes reveal mechanisms of biological responses under climate warming. We aim to estimate whether species have shifted at different rates at their leading-edges (cool boundaries) and trailing-edges (warm boundaries) in response to climate change. This research provides the first such evidence...
Article
Full-text available
Physiological research suggests that tropical insects are particularly sensitive to temperature, but information on their responses to climate change has been lacking-even though the majority of all terrestrial species are insects and their diversity is concentrated in the tropics. Here, we provide evidence that tropical insect species have already...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract: Many areas of rain forest now exist as habitat fragments, and understanding the impacts of fragmentation is important for determining the viability of populations within forest remnants. We investigated impacts of forest fragmentation on genetic diversity in the butterfly Mycalesis orseis (Satyrinae) in Sabah (Malaysian Borneo). We invest...
Article
Full-text available
Summary • Widespread and rapid losses of tropical rain forests have made understanding the responses of species to rain forest fragmentation an area of major concern. In this study we examined the impacts of habitat fragmentation on the species richness and faunal composition of butterflies in tropical rain forests in Sabah, Borneo. We analysed pat...
Article
Tropical rain forests are well known as centres of insect diversity and much effort has focused on the role of larval host plant specificity in generating and maintaining this diversity, but fewer studies have examined the exploitation of different food resources by adults in this context. Tropical butterflies feed as adults on a wide range of reso...
Article
Full-text available
We used traps baited with fruit to examine how the temporal variation of butterflies within primary forest in Sabah, Borneo differed between species. In addition, we compared patterns of temporal variation in primary and selectively logged forest, and we tested the hypothesis that selective logging has different recorded impacts on species diversit...
Article
Summary • The impacts of habitat disturbance on biodiversity within tropical forests are an area of current concern but are poorly understood and difficult to predict. This is due in part to a poor understanding of how species respond to natural variation in environmental conditions within primary forest and how these conditions alter following ant...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Increasing in global temperature likely to affect many species in tropical region because of higher species richness.