Suvi Ruuskanen

Suvi Ruuskanen
University of Jyväskylä | JYU ·  Department of Biological and Environmental Science

PhD

About

99
Publications
13,730
Reads
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1,103
Citations
Introduction
Evolutionary/Physiological/Behavioral/Molecular Ecology and Ecotoxicology
Additional affiliations
August 2015 - present
University of Turku
Position
  • Academy research fellow
October 2012 - August 2015
Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW)/ University of Groningen
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2012 - August 2012
University of Turku
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2010
University of Turku
Field of study
  • Ecology

Publications

Publications (99)
Article
Variation in stress responses has been investigated in relation to environmental factors, species ecology, life history and fitness. Moreover, mechanistic studies have unravelled molecular mechanisms of how acute and chronic stress responses cause physiological impacts (‘damage’), and how this damage can be repaired. However, it is not yet understo...
Article
Full-text available
Developmental plasticity is partly mediated by transgenerational effects, including those mediated by the maternal endocrine system. Glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones may play central roles in developmental programming through their action on metabolism and growth. However, the mechanisms by which they affect growth and development remain underst...
Article
Full-text available
The field of molecular biology is advancing fast with new powerful technologies, sequencing methods and analysis software being developed constantly. Commonly used tools originally developed for research on humans and model species are now regularly used in ecological and evolutionary research. There is also a growing interest in the causes and con...
Article
Full-text available
1. In vertebrates, thyroid hormones (THs) play an important role in the regulation of growth, development, metabolism, photoperiodic responses and migration. Maternally transferred THs are important for normal early‐phase embryonic development when embryos are not able to produce endogenous THs. Previous studies have shown that variation in materna...
Preprint
Full-text available
Early-life environment is known to affect later-life health and disease, which could be mediated by the early-life programming of telomere length, a key hallmark of ageing. According to the fetal programming of telomere biology hypothesis, variation in prenatal exposure to hormones is likely to influence telomere length. Yet the contribution of key...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change is increasing both the average ambient temperature and the frequency and severity of heat waves. While direct mortality induced by heat waves is increasingly reported, sub-lethal effects are also likely to impact wild populations. We hypothesized that accelerated ageing could be a cost of being exposed to higher ambient temperature,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Maternal hormones, such as thyroid hormones transferred to embryos and eggs, are key signalling pathways to mediate maternal effects. To be able to respond to maternal cues, embryos must express key molecular "machinery" of the hormone pathways, such as enzymes and receptors. While altricial birds begin thyroid hormone (TH) production only at/after...
Article
Full-text available
In fish, the lipid resources of the female form a link between the environment and progeny, contributing to the contents of the egg yolk. Variation of the environmental conditions is therefore expected to affect the egg quality via maternal pathways, reflecting the female’s response to the environmental factors before spawning. We investigated the...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal hormones constitute a key signalling pathway for mothers to shape offspring phenotype and fitness. Thyroid hormones (THs; triiodothyronine, T3 and thyroxine, T4) are metabolic hormones known to play crucial roles in embryonic development and survival in all vertebrates. During early developmental stages, embryos exclusively rely on the exp...
Article
Anthropogenic pollution is known to negatively influence an organism’s physiology, behaviour, and fitness. Epigenetic regulation, such as DNA methylation, has been hypothesized as a potential mechanism to mediate such effects, yet studies in wild species are lacking. We first investigated the effects of early-life exposure to the heavy metal lead (...
Article
Full-text available
Pollutants, such as toxic metals, negatively influence organismal health and performance, even leading to population collapses. Studies in model organisms have shown that epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, can be modulated by various environmental factors, including pollutants, influencing gene expression, and various organismal traits. Yet...
Article
Full-text available
Glyphosate is the leading herbicide worldwide, but it also affects prokaryotes because it targets the central enzyme (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate, EPSP) of the shikimate pathway in the synthesis of the three essential aromatic amino acids in bacteria, fungi and plants. Our results reveal that bacteria may easily become resistant to glyphosat...
Preprint
Full-text available
Maternal hormones constitute a key signalling pathway for mothers to shape offspring phenotype and fitness. Thyroid hormones (THs; triiodothyronine, T3 and thyroxine, T4) are metabolic hormones known to play crucial roles in embryonic development and survival in all vertebrates. During early developmental stages, embryos exclusively rely on the exp...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to maintain a (relatively) stable body temperature in a wide range of thermal environments by use of endogenous heat production is a unique feature of endotherms such as birds. Endothermy is acquired and regulated via various endocrine and molecular pathways, and ultimately allows wide aerial, aquatic, and terrestrial distribution in va...
Article
Full-text available
Bird feces are commonly used as a proxy for measuring dietary metal exposure levels in wild populations. Our study aims to improve the reliability and repeatability of fecal metal measurements and gives some recommendations for sampling. First, we studied levels of variation in metallic element (arsenic, calcium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel, le...
Data
Supplementary material for Eeva et al. 2020. Toxics.
Preprint
Full-text available
Pollutants, like toxic metals, negatively influence organismal health and performance, even leading to population collapses. Studies in model organisms have shown that epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, can be modulated by various environmental factors, including pollutants, influencing gene expression and various organismal traits. Yet exp...
Article
Full-text available
The underlying mechanisms of the lifelong consequences of prenatal environmental condition on health and ageing remain little understood. Thyroid hormones (THs) are important regulators of embryogenesis, transferred from the mother to the embryo. Since prenatal THs can accelerate early-life development, we hypothesized that this might occur at the...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and pollution are some of the greatest anthropogenic threats to wild animals. Transgenerational plasticity-when parental exposure to environmental stress leads to changes in offspring phenotype-has been highlighted as a potential mechanism to respond to various environmental and anthropogenic changes across taxa. Transgenerational ef...
Article
Full-text available
Glyphosate is the most common broad-spectrum herbicide. It targets the key enzyme of the shikimate pathway, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), which synthesizes three essential aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan) in plants. Because the shikimate pathway is also found in many prokaryotes and fungi, the wid...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal thyroid hormones (THs) are known to be crucial in embryonic development in humans, but their influence on other, especially wild, animals remains poorly understood. So far, the studies that experimentally investigated the consequences of maternal THs focused on short-term effects, while early organisational effects with long-term consequen...
Article
All organisms have a stress response system to cope with environmental threats, yet its precise form varies hugely within and across individuals, populations, and species. While the physiological mechanisms are increasingly understood, how stress responses have evolved remains elusive. Here, we show that important insights can be gained from models...
Article
Hormones transferred from mothers to their offspring are considered a maternal tool to prepare progeny for expected environmental conditions, increasing maternal and offspring fitness. To flexibly influence offspring, mothers should be able to transmit the hormonal signals independent of their own hormonal status. However, the ability to regulate h...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal effects via hormonal transfer from the mother to the offspring provide a tool to translate environmental cues to the offspring. Experimental manipulations of maternally transferred hormones have yielded increasingly contradictory results, which may be explained by differential effects of hormones under different environmental contexts. Yet...
Article
Full-text available
Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are the most frequently used herbicides globally. They were launched as a safe solution for weed control, but recently, an increasing number of studies have shown the existence of GBH residues and highlighted the associated risks they pose throughout ecosystems. Conventional agricultural practices often include th...
Article
Full-text available
Controversial glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are the most frequently used herbicides globally. GBH residues in the wild, in animal and human food may expose non-target organisms to health risks, yet the developmental and cumulative effects of GBHs on physiology and reproduction remain poorly understood. We present the first long-term study on t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Glyphosate is the leading herbicide worldwide, but it also affects prokaryotes because it targets the central enzyme (EPSPS) of the shikimate pathway in the synthesis of the three essential aromatic amino acids in autotrophs. Our results reveal that bacteria easily become resistant to glyphosate through changes in the EPSPS active site. This indica...
Preprint
Full-text available
Glyphosate is the most common broad-spectrum herbicide. It targets the key enzyme of the shikimate pathway, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), which synthesizes three essential aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan) in plants. Because the shikimate pathway is also found in many prokaryotes and fungi, the wid...
Preprint
Full-text available
Prenatal environmental conditions can have lifelong consequences on health and aging. The underlying mechanisms remain nonetheless little understood. Thyroid hormones (THs) are important regulators of embryogenesis transferred from the mother to the embryo. In an avian model, we manipulated embryo exposure to maternal THs through egg injection and...
Preprint
Full-text available
Maternal effects via hormonal transfer from the mother to the offspring provide a tool to translate environmental cues to the offspring. Experimental manipulations of maternally transferred hormones have yielded increasingly contradictory results, which may be explained by environment-dependent effects of hormones. Yet context-dependent effects hav...
Article
Hormones transferred from mothers to their offspring are thought to be a tool for mothers to prepare their progeny for expected environmental conditions, thus increasing fitness. Thyroid hormones (THs) are crucial across vertebrates for embryonic and postnatal development and metabolism. Yet yolk THs have mostly been ignored in the context of hormo...
Article
Full-text available
The Pace‐of‐life syndrome hypothesis (POLS) represents an attractive theoretical framework suggesting that physiological and behavioural traits have evolved together with environmental conditions and life‐history strategies. POLS predicts that metabolic differences covary with behavioural variation such that high metabolic rate is associated with r...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hormones transferred from mothers to their offspring are considered a maternal tool to prepare progeny for expected environmental conditions, increasing maternal fitness. To flexibly influence offspring, mothers should be able to transmit the hormonal signals independent of their own hormonal status. However, the ability to regulate hormone transfe...
Article
Full-text available
Controversial glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are the most frequently used herbicides globally. GBH residues are detected in soil, water, crops, and food products, potentially exposing non-target organisms to health risks; these organisms include wildlife, livestock, and humans. However, the potential for GBH-related parental effects are poorly...
Preprint
Full-text available
Controversial glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are the most frequently used herbicides across the globe. In an increasing number of studies, researchers have identified GBH residues in soil, water, crops, and food products exposing non-target organisms to health risks; these organisms include wildlife, livestock, and humans. However, GBH-related...
Article
Controversial glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are the most frequently used herbicides globally. An increasing number of studies have identified GBH residues in soil, water and even human food that may expose non-target organism including wildlife, livestock, and humans to health risks. After a heated debate, European Union allowed the use of GBH...
Preprint
Full-text available
Anthropogenic pollution is known to negatively influence an organism's physiology, behavior and fitness. Epigenetic regulation, such as DNA methylation, has been hypothesized as one mechanism to mediate such effects, yet studies in wild species are lacking. We first investigated the effects of early-life exposure to the heavy metal lead (Pb) on DNA...
Article
Most of the energy fluxes supporting animal performance flow through mitochondria. Hence, inter-individual differences in performance might be rooted in inter-individual variations in mitochondrial function and density. Furthermore, because the energy required by an individual often changes across life stages, mitochondrial function and density are...
Article
Mothers may vary resource allocation to eggs and embryos, which may affect offspring fitness and prepare them to future environmental conditions. The effects of food availability and predation risk on reproduction have been extensively studied, yet their simultaneous impacts on reproductive investment and offspring early life conditions are still u...
Preprint
Full-text available
Animals' life-history traits vary largely along many continuums across species and several physiological parameters have been proposed as possible mediators that drive the life-history variation, such as metabolic rates, glucocorticoids, and oxidative stress. Interestingly, thyroid hormones (THs), despite closely interacting with these physiologica...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ability to maintain a (relatively) stable body temperature in a wide range of thermal environments is a unique feature of endotherms such as birds. Endothermy is acquired and regulated via various endocrine and molecular pathways, and ultimately allows wide aerial, aquatic, and terrestrial distribution in variable environments. However, due to...
Preprint
Full-text available
Maternal thyroid hormones (THs) are known to play a crucial role in embryonic development in humans, but their influence on other, especially wild, animals remains poorly understood. So far, the studies that experimentally investigated the consequences of maternal THs focused on short-term effects, while also long-term organisational (or programmin...
Thesis
Full-text available
The transfer of maternal hormones is a key mediator of maternal effects, transmitting context-dependent information from the mother to the offspring. Thyroid hormones (TH) have important roles in shaping metabolism, thermogenesis and coordinating embryonic development, but their role in the context of maternal hormonal effects have been relatively...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change and pollution are some of the greatest anthropogenic threats to wild animals. Transgenerational plasticity – when parental exposure to environmental stress leads to changes in offspring phenotype – has been recently highlighted as a potential mechanism to respond to various environmental and anthropogenic changes across taxa. Transge...
Preprint
Full-text available
Most of the energy fluxes supporting animal performance flow through mitochondria. Hence, inter-individual differences in performance might be rooted in inter-individual variations in mitochondrial function and density. Furthermore, because the energy required by an individual often changes across life stages, mitochondrial function and density are...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal hormones are often considered a mediator of anticipatory maternal effects; namely, mothers adjust maternal hormone transfer to prepare the offspring for the anticipated environment. The flexibility for mothers to adjust hormone transfer is therefore a prerequisite for such anticipatory maternal effects. Nevertheless, previous studies have...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hormones transferred from mothers to their offspring are thought to be a maternal tool for mothers to prepare their progeny for expected environmental conditions, thus increasing fitness. Thyroid hormones (THs) are crucial across vertebrates for embryonic and post-natal development and metabolism. Nevertheless, the studies that investigated the con...
Article
Maternal thyroid hormones (THs) have been proven crucial for embryonic development in humans, but their influence within the natural variation on wild animals remains unknown. So far the only two studies that experimentally investigated the potential fitness consequences of maternal THs in birds found inconsistent results. More studies are thus req...
Article
This paper describes a novel mass spectrometry based analytical method for analyzing thyroid hormones (THs). Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the regulation of many biological processes such as growth, metabolism and development. Several analytical methods using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC–MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (L...
Article
Maternal effects are currently acknowledged as important causes of transgenerational phenotypic variation and a potential mechanism to adapt offspring to predicted environments, thus having a pivotal role in ecology and evolution. Research in hormonal mechanism underlying maternal effects has focused heavily on steroid hormones. Other hormones, suc...
Article
Prolonged physiological stress response may lead to an excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ultimately to oxidative stress and severe fitness costs. We investigated whether natural variation in predation risk, induced by pygmy owls (Glau-cidium passerinum), modifies the oxidative status of two free-living food-supplemented pass...
Poster
Full-text available
Metal pollution can interfere with internal nutrient homeostasis and/or change dietary quality of insectivorous birds. We compared fat soluble vitamin (A, D3, E) levels in egg yolk and nestling plasma of the great tit (Parus major) and the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) between a polluted area near a Finnish copper-nickel smelter (emitting e....
Article
Full-text available
Food-chain changes in urban and industrial sites may limit breeding-time resources (e.g. food availability) for small insectivorous passerines. We used a long-term data set of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), collected from one of the most polluted sites in Finland during the past 23 years to study the effects of metal pollution on body condi...
Article
Animal personality traits emerge developmentally from the interaction of genetic and early environmental factors. Maternal hormones, such as androgens (testosterone, T and androstenedione, A4), transferred to embryos and egg yolks may simultaneously organize multiple behavioural and physiological traits. Although previous studies demonstrated an as...
Poster
Full-text available
Food-chain changes in urban and industrial sites may limit breeding-time resources for small insectivorous passerines. We used a long-term data set of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), collected from one of the most polluted sites in Finland during the past 23 years to study the effects of metal pollution on body condition of breeding females....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Maternal effects are currently acknowledged as important causes of phenotypic variation, and a potential mechanism to adapt offspring prevalent environmental conditions - thus having a pivotal role in ecology and evolution. Hormones, such as steroid hormones, transferred from the mother a key mechanism underlying maternal effects, affecting phenoty...
Article
Full-text available
Predator presence and shortage of food resources can alter behavior and cause chronic physiological stress, with long-term detrimental effects on the prey. Recently, it has been hypothesized that cellular damage via oxidative stress could be associated with such effects. Variation in food availability and predation risk could modify the oxidative/a...
Poster
Full-text available
Injection of thyroid hormones in Japanese quail eggs resulted in an increase of hatching success.
Article
Full-text available
Mothers may affect the future success of their offspring by varying allocation to eggs and embryos. Allocation may be adaptive based on the environmental conditions perceived during early breeding. We investigated the effects of food supplementation and predation risk on yolk hormone transfer in the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca. In a food sup...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal reproductive investment can critically influence offspring phenotype, and thus these maternal effects are expected to be under strong natural selection. Knowledge on the extent of heritable variation in the physiological mechanisms underlying maternal effects is however limited. In birds, resource allocation to eggs is a key mechanism for...
Article
Exposure to metal pollution negatively affects animal physiology, including nutrient metabolism, but in the wild an effect can seldom be attributed to a single metal. Moreover, little is known about how the metabolism of vitamins, essential micronutrients for developing juveniles, is affected by toxic metals. Therefore we experimentally investigate...
Article
Full-text available
Avian mothers can potentially alter the phenotypes of their offspring by varying the concentration of steroid hormones in their eggs. We explored variation in androstenedione (A4), testosterone (T), 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 17β-estradiol (E2), and corticosterone (CORT) in the yolks of 12 free-living great tit Parus major clutches. We analyzed...
Article
Global warming has substantially changed the environment, but the mechanisms to cope with these changes in animals, including the role of maternal effects, are poorly understood. Maternal effects via hormones deposited in eggs, have important environment-dependent effects on offspring development and fitness: thus females are expected to adjust the...