Susanne Brouwer

Susanne Brouwer
Radboud University | RU · Centre for Language Studies

PhD

About

48
Publications
12,990
Reads
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522
Citations
Introduction
My main research aim is to understand how challenging (listening) conditions (e.g., foreign accents, dialects, being bilingual, background noise) influence communication and moral decision making. I use a combination of offline and online (psycholinguistic) techniques.
Additional affiliations
August 2015 - present
Radboud University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
September 2014 - January 2015
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • Lecturer
September 2013 - August 2015
Utrecht University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
August 2006 - December 2010

Publications

Publications (48)
Article
Full-text available
This study examined whether the FOREIGN-LANGUAGE EFFECT, an increase in bilinguals' rate of rational decisions to moral dilemmas in their foreign versus their native language, is influenced by emotion and the modality in which the dilemmas are presented. 154 Dutch-English bilinguals were asked to read and listen to personal and impersonal moral dil...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined whether song lyrics and their semantic meaning interfere with speech intelligibility. In three experiments, a total of 108 native Dutch participants listened to Dutch target sentences in the presence of three versions of the pop songs Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.) (Experiment 1) or Hot N Cold (Experiment 2a and 2b) by singer Katy...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies have shown that people make more utilitarian decisions when dealing with a moral dilemma in a foreign language than in their native language. Emotion, cognitive load, and psychological distance have been put forward as explanations for this foreign language effect. The question that arises is whether a similar effect would be observe...
Article
Previous studies have investigated moral decision‐making by using moral dilemmas that involve a single decision. This article extends this paradigm, introducing two‐stage scenarios to examine how moral decision‐making is influenced by previous decisions in the same narrative—especially whether people tend to stay consistent or to reconsider within...
Article
Purpose This study investigated to what extent iconic co-speech gestures help word intelligibility in sentence context in two different linguistic maskers (native vs. foreign). It was hypothesized that sentence recognition improves with the presence of iconic co-speech gestures and with foreign compared to native babble. Method Thirty-two native D...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated cross-modal influences between speech and sign in hearing bimodal bilinguals, proficient in a spoken and a sign language, and its consequences on visual attention during message preparation using eye-tracking. We focused on spatial expressions in which sign languages, unlike spoken languages, have a modality-driven preference to men...
Article
Background: Informing patients about chemotherapy-related cognitive symptoms (CRCS) may increase perceived cognitive symptoms. This longitudinal randomized study evaluated this Adverse Information Effect (AIE) in breast cancer patients and examined whether self-affirmation (SA) can reduce AIEs (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT04813965). Patient...
Article
Full-text available
The current study investigated how individual differences among children affect the added value of social robots for teaching second language (L2) vocabulary to young children. Specifically, we investigated the moderating role of three individual child characteristics deemed relevant for language learning: first language (L1) vocabulary knowledge,...
Article
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Purpose This study compares online word recognition and prediction in preschoolers with (a suspicion of) a developmental language disorder (DLD) and typically developing (TD) controls. Furthermore, it investigates correlations between these measures and the link between online and off-line language scores in the DLD group. Method Using the visual...
Article
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Bimodal bilinguals are hearing individuals fluent in a sign and a spoken language. Can the two languages influence each other in such individuals despite differences in the visual (sign) and vocal (speech) modalities of expression? We investigated cross-linguistic influences on bimodal bilinguals’ expression of spatial relations. Unlike spoken lang...
Article
To talk about space, spoken languages rely on arbitrary and categorical forms (e.g., left, right). In sign languages, however, the visual-spatial modality allows for iconic encodings (motivated form-meaning mappings) of space in which form and location of the hands bear resemblance to the objects and spatial relations depicted. We assessed whether...
Article
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While numerous studies have recently shown that variation in input quantity predicts children’s rate of acquisition across a range of language skills, comparatively little is known about the impact of variation in input quality on (bilingual) children’s language development. This study investigated the relation between specific quality-oriented pro...
Article
Full-text available
Daily speech communication often takes place in suboptimal listening conditions, in which interlocutors typically need to segregate the target signal from the background sounds. The present study investigated the influence on speech recognition of a relatively familiar foreign accent in background speech (Exp. 1) and whether short-term immediate ex...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has shown that people make systematically different decisions when faced with a moral dilemma in a native than in a foreign language [e.g. Costa, A., A. Foucart, S. Hayakawa, M. Aparici, J. Apesteguia, J. Heafner, and B. Keysar. 2014. “Your Morals Depend on Language.” PLoS One 9 (4): e94842]. The aim of the current study is to tes...
Article
This study investigated whether cross-linguistic differences affect semantic prediction. We assessed this by looking at two languages, Dutch and Turkish, that differ in word order and thus vary in how words come together to create sentence meaning. In an eye-tracking task, Dutch and Turkish four-year-olds ( N = 40), five-year-olds ( N = 58), and ad...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, Limburgian and Dutch 2.5- to 4-year-olds and adults took part in a word learning experiment. Following the procedure employed by Quam and Swingley (2010) and Singh et al. (2014), participants learned two novel word-object mappings. After training, word recognition was tested in correct pronunciation (CP) trials and mispronunciation (...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has shown that the more similar the target and the masker signal, the harder it is to segregate the two streams effectively [i.e., target-masking linguistic similarity hypothesis, e.g., Brouwer, Van Engen, Calandruccio, and Bradlow (2012). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 131(2), 1449–1464]. The present study examined whether this hypothesis h...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the fact that many of the world's languages use lexical tone, the majority of language acquisition studies has focused on non-tone languages. Research on tone languages has typically investigated well-known tone languages such as Mandarin and Cantonese Chinese. The current study looked at a Limburgian dialect of Dutch that uses lexical pitc...
Article
Previous research has demonstrated that grammatical gender in Dutch is typically acquired late. Most of this work used production data only, and consequently children's knowledge of Dutch gender may have been underestimated. In this study, therefore, we examined whether 49 4- to 7-year-old Dutch-speaking children (and 19 adult controls) were able t...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the temporal dynamics of spoken word recognition in noise and background speech. In two visual-world experiments, English participants listened to target words while looking at four pictures on the screen: a target (e.g. candle), an onset competitor (e.g. candy), a rhyme competitor (e.g. sandal), and an unrelated distractor (e.g...
Book
The present text addresses theoretical and practical concerns that are relevant for large-scale investigations of bilingual development. It discusses the necessity of approaches that use a variety of elicitation methods and assess different populations. Such investigations can help resolve some of the most important current questions and controvers...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter will focus on the use of eye-tracking in the visual world paradigm. This method can be employed to investigate a number of language comprehension issues, and we will begin with a brief overview of the history of the method and some of the applications. More centrally, we will discuss how it can be used to assess the impact of cross-lin...
Article
Full-text available
Speech processing can often take place in adverse listening conditions that involve the mixing of speech and background noise. In this study, we investigated processing dependencies between background noise and indexical speech features, using a speeded classification paradigm (Garner, 1974; Exp. 1), and whether background noise is encoded and repr...
Article
It is now well established that anticipation of upcoming input is a key characteristic of spoken language comprehension. It has also frequently been observed that literacy influences spoken language processing. Here, we investigated whether anticipatory spoken language processing is related to individuals' word reading abilities. Dutch adults with...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the influence of background language variation on speech recognition. English listeners performed an English sentence recognition task in either "pure" background conditions in which all trials had either English or Dutch background babble or in mixed background conditions in which the background language varied across trials (i...
Article
Speech processing can often take place in listening conditions that involve the mixing of speech and background noise. This study used a speeded classification paradigm to investigate whether background noise is perceptually integrated with indexical (Exp. 1) and phonetic (Exp. 2) dimensions of the speech signal. In each experiment, English listene...
Article
To investigate masking release for speech maskers for linguistically and phonetically close (English and Dutch) and distant (English and Mandarin) language pairs. Thirty-two monolingual speakers of English with normal audiometric thresholds participated in the study. Data are reported for an English sentence recognition task in English and for Dutc...
Article
Previous research has shown that talker variability affects recognition memory for spoken words [Palmeri et al., (1993)]. This study examines whether additive noise is similarly retained in memory for spoken words. In a continuous recognition memory task, participants listened to a list of spoken words mixed with noise consisting of a pure tone or...
Article
Full-text available
The present research examines how different types of indexical information, namely talker information and the language being spoken, are perceptually integrated in bilingual speech. Using a speeded classification paradigm [Garner (1974)], variability in characteristics of the talker (gender in experiment 1 and specific talker in experiment 2) and i...
Article
Full-text available
In two eye-tracking experiments we examined whether wider discourse information helps the recognition of reduced pronunciations (e.g., “puter”) more than the recognition of canonical pronunciations of spoken words (e.g., “computer”). Dutch participants listened to sentences from a casual speech corpus containing canonical and reduced target words....
Article
Full-text available
In listeners' daily communicative exchanges, they most often hear casual speech, in which words are often produced with fewer segments, rather than the careful speech used in most psycholinguistic experiments. Three experiments examined phonological competition during the recognition of reduced forms such as [pjutər] for computer using a target-abs...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined whether speech-on-speech masking is sensitive to variation in the degree of similarity between the target and the masker speech. Three experiments investigated whether speech-in-speech recognition varies across different background speech languages (English vs Dutch) for both English and Dutch targets, as well as across variatio...
Article
Full-text available
Three eye-tracking experiments investigated how phonological reductions (e.g., “puter” for “computer”) modulate phonological competition. Participants listened to sentences extracted from a spontaneous speech corpus and saw four printed words: a target (e.g., “computer”), a competitor similar to the canonical form (e.g., “companion”), one similar t...
Article
Full-text available
Listeners' interactions often take place in auditorily challenging conditions. We examined how noise affects phonological competition during spoken word recognition. In a visual-world experiment, which allows us to examine the time-course of recognition, English participants listened to target words in quiet and in noise while they saw four picture...
Article
Full-text available
Initial lexical activation in typical populations is a direct reflection of the goodness of fit between the presented stimulus and the intended target. In this study, lexical activation was investigated upon presentation of polysyllabic pseudowords (such as procodile for crocodile) for the atypical population of dyslexic adults to see to what exten...
Article
Previous research has shown that monolingual English listeners receive a release from informational masking if the competing speech is foreign-language versus native-language noise [e.g., Van Engen & Bradlow (2007)]. This study examines whether speech-in-speech recognition varies even across typologically close target and noise languages (English v...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined whether listeners align to reduced speech. Participants were asked to shadow sentences from a casual speech corpus containing canonical and reduced targets. Participants' productions showed alignment: durations of canonical targets were longer than durations of reduced targets; and participants often imitated the segment types (...
Article
How do listeners recognize reduced forms that occur in spontaneous speech, such as "puter" for "computer"? To this end, eye-tracking experiments were performed in which participants heard a sentence and saw four printed words on a computer screen. The auditory stimuli contained canonical and reduced forms from a spontaneous speech corpus in differe...
Article
Full-text available
Most research on spoken word comprehension has focused on carefully articulated speech that is read aloud by selected speakers (Cutler, 1998). But the type of speech we most often encounter is spontaneous speech, in which no attention is paid to careful pronunciation. The production of a word shorter than its citation form is called reduction, whic...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research revealed that monolingual children between 11- and 13-yearold show a target-like production with respect to gender assignment of definite determiners whereas this is not the case for bilingual children who massively overgeneralize de. In order to further investigate this overgeneralization, we designed an experimental decision tas...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
Goal of this project was to - investigate the development of the perception of East-Limburgian lexical tones in the first year of life as well as in adult speakers of East-Limburgian - investigate the role of lexical tone in word learning and recognition in East-Limburgian toddlers as well as adults - all experiments featured a control group of speakers of Standard Dutch without knowledge of Limburgian