Susan M. Tsang

Susan M. Tsang
American Museum of Natural History

PhD Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Behavior

About

29
Publications
12,965
Reads
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315
Citations
Citations since 2016
23 Research Items
266 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
Additional affiliations
September 2012 - May 2013
University of Indonesia
Position
  • Visiting Researcher
Description
  • Special Seminar in Basic R, Professional Development
August 2011 - May 2012
City College of New York
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • BI101 (Foundations of Biology I), BI228 (Ecology & Evolution)
August 2008 - May 2009
Skidmore College
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • BI105 (Biological Sciences I)
Education
August 2009 - May 2015
CUNY Graduate Center
Field of study
  • Biology (Ecology, Evolution, Behavior)
August 2005 - May 2009
Skidmore College
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
Bats are important reservoirs for alpha‐ and beta‐coronaviruses. Coronaviruses (CoV) have been detected in pteropodid bats from several Southeast Asian countries, but little is known about coronaviruses in the Indonesian archipelago in proportion to its mammalian biodiversity. In this study, we screened pooled fecal samples from Indonesian colonies...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Comprehensive, global information on species' occurrences is an essential biodiversity variable and central to a range of applications in ecology, evolution, biogeography and conservation. Expert range maps often represent a species' only available distributional information and play an increasing role in conservation assessments and macroeco...
Article
Full-text available
Diverse paramyxoviruses have coevolved with their bat hosts, including fruit bats such as flying foxes (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae). Several of these viruses are zoonotic, but the diversity and distribution of Paramyxoviridae are poorly understood. We screened pooled feces samples from three Pteropus vampyrus colonies and assayed tissues, rectal swab...
Article
Full-text available
The family Pteropodidae (Old World fruit bats) comprises >200 species distributed across the Old World tropics and subtropics. Most pteropodids feed on fruit, suggesting an early origin of frugivory, although several lineages have shifted to nectar-based diets. Pteropodids are of exceptional conservation concern with >50% of species considered thre...
Article
Small isolated populations are vulnerable to both stochastic events and the negative consequences of genetic drift. For threatened species, the genetic management of such populations has therefore become a crucial aspect of conservation. Flying foxes (Pteropus spp, Chiroptera) are keystone species with essential roles in pollination and seed disper...
Chapter
Island taxa face heightened extinction risk due the lower population sizes, reduced land area, and barriers to dispersal. These factors combined with global climate change and anthropogenic pressure intensify the level of extinction that threaten island species. A group that is experiencing these types of threats are the flying foxes—giant fruit ba...
Article
Full-text available
Bats are very diverse, including over 1400 species (Simmons and Cirranello 2020), meaning that one in every five living mammal species is a bat. These remarkable animals include species living on every continent except Antarctica. Many of them perform essential ecosystem services including consuming large quantities of insects, dispersing seeds, an...
Preprint
Full-text available
Small isolated populations are vulnerable to both stochastic events and the negative consequences of genetic drift. For threatened species, the genetic management of such populations has therefore become a crucial aspect of conservation. Flying foxes (Pteropus spp, Chiroptera) are keystone species with essential roles in pollination and seed disper...
Article
Full-text available
Flying foxes are important ecological keystone species on many archipelagoes, and Indonesia is home to over a third of all flying fox species globally. However, the amount of research on this clade belies their importance to natural systems, particularly as they are increasingly threatened by anthropogenic development and hunting. Here, we provide...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Islands provide opportunities for isolation and speciation. Many landmasses in the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA) are oceanic islands, and founder-event speciation is expected to be the predominant form of speciation of volant taxa on these islands. We studied the biogeographic history of flying foxes, a group with many endemic species and...
Article
Full-text available
Durian is economically important for local livelihoods in Indonesia. Our study investigated the identity of pollinators of semi‐wild durian and subsequently estimated the economic contribution of these pollination services. We conducted pollination exclusion experiments and deployed camera traps at durian trees from October 2017 to January 2018 in...
Article
Full-text available
In the last 100 years, the Bridle Shiner has declined over significant parts of its range. We used mitochondrial and nuclear microsatellite markers to investigate population structure of this species. Tissue samples were collected from populations in six drainages in PA, NJ, NY and CT. One predominant haplotype was observed in the Delaware, Housato...
Article
Full-text available
Pteropus griseus (gray flying fox) is a species of Old World fruit bat that is listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as Data Deficient. The species is found on small islands in the Lesser Sundas and Sulawesi, and is endemic to Indonesia, but no contemporary roosts are known, and the last study of the species was in Tim...
Article
Full-text available
Pteropus vampyrus, the largest bat in the world, has a broad geographic range covering much of Southeast Asia. The wide distribution of P. vampyrus and its ability to cross oceanic expanses makes management of this threatened species an international concern. Pteropus vampyrus is an essential seed disperser and pollinator of rain forest trees, many...
Poster
Full-text available
The National Museum was created in 1901 with the passage of Act No. 284 to establish the Insular Museum of Ethnology, Natural History and Commerce, and was later transferred to the Bureau of Science in 1904. World War II destroyed the infrastructure of the Bureau of Science, including the valuable type specimens in the reference and herbarium colle...
Article
Full-text available
Urban forests are important for alleviating the impact of environmental stress in intensely developed cities and play a role in maintaining natural interactions in urban ecosystems. Two of the most densely populated cities in Southeast Asia: Jakarta and Depok, Indonesia, have seen a dramatic decrease in green spaces, despite the importance of such...
Chapter
Full-text available
Taxonomy—the description, naming, and classification of organisms—and systematics—the study of the evolutionary relationships of organisms—are both crucial components in conservation, providing a necessary framework for any conservation initiative. With more than 200 new bat species identified or raised from synonymy in the past decade and addition...
Article
Full-text available
Bat species in the genus Pteropus (flying foxes) occur throughout most of Southeast Asia, but little is known about their distribution and patterns of local diversity across much of Indonesia. To help address this problem, a field survey of Pteropus species in Central and West Seram, Maluku Province, Indonesia, was conducted in 2012 and 2013. This...
Article
Full-text available
The intense consumption of flying foxes in North Sulawesi, Indonesia has raised hunting pressure and extirpation is expected to spread into other regions. To assess local cultural attitudes towards bats for formulating a targeted conservation campaign, we conducted a survey of consumption practices of bats in 2013 at the eight major markets near Ma...
Article
Full-text available
Six genera of accipitrids (Erythrotriorchis, Hamirostra, Harpyopsis, Henicopernis, Lophoictinia, and Megatriorchis), composed of a total of eight species, are endemic to the Australo-Papuan region. Traditionally, these were assigned to four subfamilies in the Accipitridae; however, a recent hypothesis suggested they together comprise an endemic rad...
Article
In many animals, sexual selection has resulted in complex signaling systems in which males advertise aspects of their phenotypic or genetic quality through elaborate ornamentation and display behaviors. Different ornaments might convey different information or be directed at different receivers, but they might also be redundant signals of quality t...

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