Susan Campbell

Susan Campbell
Independent

PhD Art History MPhil Irish Art History HND Fine Art BA Communications Studies
Visual arts writer, researcher, historian.

About

4
Publications
61
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Introduction
https://www.susancampbellartwork.com My doctoral thesis (see Projects) was titled ‘All There in the Weave: Duality and Unity in the Art of Richard Tuttle’. I am grateful I was funded for the final year of the programme by the Irish Research Council, and for the first three years by a Postgraduate Studentship awarded by The University of Dublin, Trinity College. In 2016, I received a Thomas Dammann Junior Memorial Trust award, which financed an invaluable research trip to the United States.
Education
September 2014 - January 2019
Trinity College Dublin
Field of study
  • Art History
September 2012 - September 2013
Trinity College Dublin
Field of study
  • Art History
September 2010 - May 2012
Bray Institute of Further Education
Field of study
  • Visual Arts Practice

Publications

Publications (4)
Presentation
Full-text available
Research seminar paper
Conference Paper
‘Line, textile and the art of Richard Tuttle’: Abstract My doctoral research is concerned with probing the oeuvre of the American artist Richard Tuttle through the lens of textiles. A practitioner whose career emerged as conventions relating to textiles were being renegotiated by such figures as Lenore Tawney and Magdalena Abakanowicz, his work par...
Presentation
A presentation designed to reveal the invisible world of textiles and the weave through performance and collaborative activity.

Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
PhD thesis. Abstract: This investigation into the art of the seminal American Postminimalist Richard Tuttle (1941- ) responds to a 2014-15 survey show at the Tate Modern Turbine Hall and Whitechapel Gallery, London, which spotlighted the prevalence of textiles and related materials and techniques in his oeuvre and mode of exhibition. It focuses on questions about what duality and weaving mean within his field of reference, having identified that Tuttle’s work and speech display a pronounced tendency to engage with the dynamics of either/or. This is related in this thesis to his sense that he and his generation were “born into a broken world”. The task undertaken is to contextualise this statement while establishing a framework of analysis equipped to probe it. Homing in on structural relations, it draws on Tuttle’s autodidactic programme of study, through which – for longer than his fifty-five-year career – he has traversed time and space in pursuit of insight and understanding. In acknowledging his self-declared mysticism, it explores his spiritual beliefs through a synoptic engagement with Eastern traditions, specifically Hinduism, Buddhism and Taoism. It theorises his work as a personally and socially motivated dialectic and weave-constructing response to the rupture he perceives in a polarised world. An historical and theoretical analysis of the at-once ancient, ubiquitous and cutting-edge domain of weaving and textiles uncovers mechanisms at play in Tuttle’s unity-seeking exercise, founded, as it is, on a deeply held belief in the efficacy of art.