Susan Baidawi

Susan Baidawi
Monash University (Australia) · Department of Social Work

PhD (Social Work) BSW (Hons), BPharm (Hons), Senior Lecturer

About

60
Publications
14,654
Reads
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490
Citations
Introduction
Social work academic with expertise in crossover children, child maltreatment, child protection and out-of-home care systems, youth offending and ageing prisoners. Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow and Senior Lecturer Fellow in the Department of Social Work, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Experienced in quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods research, policy and legislative analysis.
Additional affiliations
January 2017 - present
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Senior Researcher
September 2010 - December 2016
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Research Officer
Education
February 2014 - February 2017
Monash University (Australia)
Field of study
  • Social Work
February 2008 - February 2010
Monash University (Australia)
Field of study
  • Social Work
February 1999 - December 2002
Monash University
Field of study
  • Pharmacy

Publications

Publications (60)
Article
Children and young people’s access to and engagement in education is a key determinant of future positive outcomes. Children and young people in out-of-home care disproportionally experience educational disruptions and disengagements affecting their ability to participate in schooling, further and higher education. There is increasing international...
Article
Full-text available
International literature suggests that many young people transitioning from government care become parents before age 21, characteristically termed ‘early parenting’, at least in the English-speaking world. Yet there is only limited knowledge of the factors that lead to this challenging responsibility. This paper presents findings from a qualitativ...
Article
Full-text available
Children placed in residential care are significantly over‐represented in youth justice systems. Drawing on interviews and focus groups with service providers, this exploratory study examines practice factors that impact on the criminalization of this group of children across multiple services and systems, including in the residential care environm...
Article
Full-text available
Maltreated and child welfare-involved youth are over-represented in juvenile justice systems. These youth are at a greater risk of serious offending and justice system entrenchment relative to their non-maltreated peers. Understanding gender differences in the pathways to justice involvement and the nature of offending among maltreated children is...
Article
Full-text available
Background The disproportionately high number of Aboriginal crossover children traversing child protection and youth justice systems is a longstanding concern across countries with historic legacies of settler-colonialism. Aims This study explored what key stakeholders who directly work with Aboriginal crossover children perceive are the unique ch...
Article
Purpose: The purpose of this commentary is to draw upon available literature and practices related to COVID-19 and management of older incarcerated adults in Australia to highlight key matters for better risk management and care of this population during this and future infectious disease pan/epidemics. Design/methodology/approach: The present c...
Article
Full-text available
Although neurodisability features significantly across child welfare and youth justice cohorts, little research investigates neurodisability among crossover children with dual systems involvement. This study examined differences in childhood adversity, child protection involvement, and offending among crossover children by neurodisability status. D...
Article
Child maltreatment research is increasingly recognizing the need to capture patterns of co-occurrence between different types of abuse/neglect and to consider their associations with psychosocial functioning. Few studies have examined these issues in justice-involved youth despite the fact that rates of maltreatment and trauma-related psychopatholo...
Article
Background While at higher risk, child protection-involved youth are the subject of negligible research focusing on the criminal exploitation of children by adults. Purpose This exploratory study examines criminal exploitation of ‘crossover’ children, those traversing the child protection and youth justice systems, in Victoria Australia. It examin...
Article
Full-text available
Young people with complex support needs frequently experience multiple intersecting forms of disadvantage including experiences of violence, abuse and neglect, housing instability and homelessness, problematic substance use, exclusion from education, and contact with the criminal justice system. Many of these young people have mental health, cognit...
Article
Full-text available
The over-representation of children from child protection backgrounds in the youth justice system is a significant and longstanding concern. While the association between child maltreatment and youth offending is established, the pathway of child protection-involved youth to criminal justice outcomes has received little attention. This paper presen...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This study is a collaboration between Monash University and the Children’s Court of Victoria. It was funded both by a Criminology Research Grant (CRG 03/15-16) from the Australian Institute of Criminology and by the Victorian Department of Justice and Regulation, and undertaken between July 2016 and August 2018. The study set out to examine the ext...
Article
Child protection-involved youth face increased risk of criminal justice system contact. Such “crossover children” experience earlier police involvement and more serious criminal justice sanctions, yet little is known about their early offending. Using a cross-sectional sample of 300 crossover children before three Victorian Children's Courts in 201...
Book
"Crossover" Children in the Youth Justice and Child Protection Systems explores the outcomes faced by the group of children who experience involvement with both child protection and youth justice systems across several countries, including the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia. Situated against a backdrop of interna...
Chapter
Case file information and the views of professionals are drawn together in this chapter to illuminate the nature of crossover children’s offending. This chapter provides an overview of offence types,offending volume, and sentencing outcomes seen among crossover children. What is shown is that crossover children in this study were more frequently ch...
Chapter
Devising effective strategies to respond to the phenomenon of crossover children is best supported by a detailed and holistic understanding of their individual and family characteristics, alongside the pathways this group of children traverse through education, health, and welfare systems. This chapter presents information gathered from court recor...
Chapter
The study findings confirm the vulnerability of children whose early life adversity and systemic disadvantage can propel them into early criminal justice involvement. Support and intervention in relation to preventing maltreatment and other harms, responding to educational needs, developmental trauma, mental and behavioural health needs, and disabi...
Chapter
Children receiving statutory child protection services due to abuse, neglect, or parental incapacity are considerably more likely to come under the supervision of youth justice services compared to other children in the community. These are internationally observed trends, identifiable across numerous Western contexts including in Australia, the Un...
Article
Child protection-involved children experience disproportionately high criminal justice system contact, yet little is known about the circumstances in which such children offend. This study sought to identify the contexts in which this group of children offend and factors associated with children being charged in each context. A mixed-methods analys...
Article
Full-text available
A number of studies have found that working with family groups can be successful in improving outcomes for young people and their families. This article reports on a study in New South Wales in which juvenile justice staff offered collaborative family work interventions to young people as part of the routine offerings of a juvenile justice service....
Article
Young people with complex support needs who live outside metropolitan areas face unique challenges. Issues such as poor educational and employment opportunities, homelessness, racism, problematic substance use, challenging behaviour, disability and mental illness can be magnified and lead to judgment and marginalisation in small communities such as...
Chapter
This chapter reports on exploratory research in Victoria, Australia, involving focus groups and interviews with service providers and Indigenous care leavers to examine the impact of existing support services. Indigenous children and young people are highly overrepresented in the Australian out-of-home care system. To date, neither specific researc...
Article
The over-representation of acquired brain injury (ABI) amongst prisoner and juvenile justice populations is a significant issue across jurisdictions. This article reports on the findings of over 100 interviews conducted in Victoria, Australia with people who have an ABI, as well as key stakeholder groups who work in, or with, the justice system. Th...
Article
This article focuses on the issues currently facing people with an acquired brain injury (ABI) in the criminal justice system in the state of Victoria, Australia and, in particular, the impact of this condition on people suffering various forms of social disadvantage. This qualitative study involved in‐depth interviews with key stakeholders, such a...
Chapter
This chapter examines the engagement of social work academics in the policy process in Australia. It begins by presenting an overview of social policy in Australia and by discussing the emergence of social work and the place of policy practice in that country. The features of social work education in Australia are then depicted. Following this, the...
Chapter
This unique perspective on the academia-society nexus is the first cross-national comparative study on academic engagement in social policy formulation.
Article
Physical and functional health issues among older prisoners may be difficult to address in an environment designed for younger inmates. This article investigates the relationships between older prisoners’ health, their experiences of the prison environment and health services, and their levels of psychological distress. One hundred and seventy-thre...
Article
Full-text available
This paper compares the contributions of socio-demographic, health, mental health, social and environmental factors in explaining variations in psychological distress among older prisoners in two Australian states. One hundred and seventy three prisoners (aged 50+ ) from 8 Australian prisons were interviewed using the Kessler Psychological Distress...
Article
Parental incarceration has wide-ranging impacts on families. One key effect may be disruption to the care and legal custody of children, yet few studies have examined processes and outcomes relating to care planning for children of prisoners. This paper presents findings of interviews with 151 primary carer prisoners in two Australian states which...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous children and young people are overrepresented in the Australian out-of-home care (OOHC) system. To date, specific research has not been undertaken on workers' perspectives regarding the Indigenous-specific and non-Indigenous supports and services available to Indigenous young people exiting the system. This exploratory research involved...
Article
This study investigates relationships between older prisoners’ social experiences and their levels of distress. One hundred and seventy three older prisoners (aged ≥50 years) from eight Australian prisons were administered the Kessler Psychological Distress (K10) Scale, with additional information collected via individual interviews. Psychological...
Research
Full-text available
This report presents the findings of a 14 month exploratory study of Indigenous care leavers in Victoria. The study aimed to examine current leaving care and post-care systems available to Indigenous care leavers, paying particular attention to relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous agencies, and differences in their approach to servic...
Article
Indigenous children and young people are over-represented at all stages of the Australian child protection system. Policy and legislative initiatives exist in the state of Victoria, Australia aiming to support the connection between Indigenous children and young people in state care and their culture and community. This exploratory research involve...
Chapter
Full-text available
A significant proportion of young people leaving out-of-home care (OHC) experience involvement with the Youth Justice system, exposing them to further risks and reducing their likelihood of full social and economic engagement in mainstream society. However, little is known about the experiences of this dual order client group as they transition fro...
Article
Background: The growth among older prisoner populations, including in Australia, necessitates an understanding of this group in order to generate effective management strategies. One particular concern is the mental well-being of older prisoners. This study aimed to determine the level of psychological distress among sentenced prisoners aged 50 ye...
Conference Paper
Older prisoners are the fastest growing subgroup of inmates in many countries, including in the US, UK, Germany, Japan, New Zealand and Australia. Older people constitute a special needs group of prisoners, and further information regarding this population is required to facilitate appropriate responses by correctional services. One particular conc...
Article
Full-text available
Older people constitute the fastest growing age group among many prisoner populations worldwide, yet little is known about the mental wellbeing of this population. This article reviews research examining the level of psychological distress experienced by older prisoners, as well as the factors associated with this phenomenon. Findings suggest that...
Article
Full-text available
Probation officers and others who work with young offenders often challenge or confront their clients in relation to pro-criminal comments and criminal behaviour. There is, however, very little research that can inform practitioners about which forms of challenging most effectively engage young people. This study examines the use of challenging by...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Older prisoners are the fastest growing age group within many correctional systems worldwide, including in Australia. As the average age of the prison population continues to rise, the issue of how to identify and manage the health care needs of the expanding older prisoner group becomes ever more pressing. This Evidence Check provides a summary of...
Article
Full-text available
Young people leaving state out-of-home care are among the most disadvantaged and vulnerable young Australians, and a substantial proportion experience mental health issues. This article reviews the literature relating to the mental health of care leavers, highlighting the gaps in the current Australian research base. Available studies indicate that...
Article
Full-text available
While it has been recognised for some time that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people are significantly over-represented among youth justice populations, there is a dearth of research examining the elements of effective supervision for this group. This article presents the initial findings of a research project based on a partnership b...
Article
Young people transitioning from out-of-home care are a particularly vulnerable and disadvantaged group. In recent years, there have been significant improvements in Victorian policy and legislation providing support to care leavers. However, these supports remain discretionary rather than mandatory, and many care leavers experience difficult transi...
Article
Young people transitioning from out-of-home care placements (either home-based care or residential care in Australia) are a particularly vulnerable and disadvantaged group. This study reports on a research project based on a partnership between Monash University and seven non-government child and youth welfare agencies in the Australian State of Vi...
Article
There is considerable evidence pointing towards the growth of older prisoner populations in Australia. This article presents findings from the first large-scale study of older prisoners in Australia (N=173), examining functional independence, aspects of the prison environment which present difficulties for less able older prisoners, the uptake of p...
Article
Full-text available
A significant proportion of young people leaving out-of-home care make their transition to independence via the youth justice system, exposing them to further risks and reducing their likelihood of full social and economic engagement in mainstream society. This article presents the initial findings of a research project based on a partnership betwe...
Article
This paper considers some contentious ethical questions associated with researching young people transitioning from out-of home care. We consider the potential benefits and costs for care leavers of involvement in research, alongside managing limits to confidentiality, and the social, psychological, and legal harms that may arise from breaching con...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Evidence suggests young people leaving state care are at a greater risk of involvement with the Youth Justice system compared to young people in the general population. This report presents the results of the second phase of the Leaving Care and Youth Justice project which aimed to generate a more in depth understanding of the involvement of care l...
Article
Local and international research suggests an overrepresentation of young people leaving state out-of-home care in the youth justice system. A range of factors appear to contribute to this correlation including child abuse and neglect, placement instability, experiences of residential care, and unsupported transitions from care. This article present...
Article
Full-text available
Corrections statistics in Australia indicate a clear trend towards increased numbers of older prisoners and the growth of this inmate group is paralleled in prisons in the United States, United Kingdom and New Zealand. Older prisoner populations present a number of challenges for governments, correctional administrators, healthcare providers and co...
Article
Existing research findings indicate that young people from state care backgrounds experience higher rates of substance use and misuse than the general population. This study explored the nature of this relationship via semi-structured, qualitative interviews with four young people who had recently transitioned from state care and three workers in t...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Funded by an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Award (DECRA) (2019-21), this project investigates the phenomenon of children who cross over from statutory child protection systems into youth justice systems, and is being conducted in partnership with the Children's Court of Victoria. The analysis will draw data from Children’s Court files and international policy, and expects to generate new knowledge regarding the characteristics and trajectories of crossover children, and to improve understandings of how this group differs from children only involved with child protection or youth justice systems. The findings will inform novel and effective approaches to preventing and responding to the drift of children from child protection into youth justice systems which will improve social and economic outcomes for young people and the broader community.
Project
Funding agency: Australian Research Council – Linkage Project 2015-2018. This is a multi-state collaborative research project between Monash University and LaTrobe University (Victoria), the University of New South Wales and Queensland University of Technology. The project seeks to improve the lives of young people with complex support needs who experience overlapping forms of disadvantage. It investigates how best to support their frequent transitions between services, institutions and care environments. These transitions are particularly problematic for this group, and if poorly supported, have significant social and economic costs.