Sunil Verma

Sunil Verma
Vivekananda college, University of Delhi · Applied Psychology

D.Phil

About

42
Publications
20,697
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251
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
August 2009 - November 2010
Sikkim University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
August 2002 - July 2009
University of Allahabad
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
While most studies have been reporting the psychological issues being faced by the public due to the global spread of coronavirus and sudden restrictions and changes accompanying it, the present study attempted to explore dynamic human experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic and resultant lockdown, so as to understand the psycho-social factors tha...
Article
Full-text available
Empowerment of the stigmatized and the marginalized has ever been the biggest concern of Indian society. However, essentially no universal measure exists to tap it. The aim was to develop a measure of socio-political empowerment to understand its meaning and structure amongst the Indian caste margins. Based on the elicited themes from a qualitative...
Article
Full-text available
The present study endeavored to understand the perceptions of Indian older adults (age 60 and above) from urban centres of New Delhi, Kolkata, and Mumbai, about the state of youth development in India through applying a generational perspective. Drawing from our understanding of Bourdieu’s concept of cultural reproduction of values, the study explo...
Article
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Various researches have been carried out in the past to understand psychological trauma that suggest that gender differences can be observed in the type, prevalence, and impact of trauma. Ample evidence exists that indicates that women are often the target of different kinds of gender-based violence, causing them to experience physical and psycholo...
Article
Full-text available
Suicide prevention in times of COVID-19 pandemic has become more challenging than ever due to unusual circumstances. The common risk factors identified with regard to suicidal behavior are fear of COVID-19, economic instability, poor access to healthcare facilities, pre-existing psychiatric disorders, and social disconnect. The studies done so far...
Article
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The COVID-19 pandemic has been instrumental in creating a dramatic shift frompeople’s need to live in mutual association toward a desire to stigmatize distinctive others. Pandemic seems to be causing othering. Stated simply, stigmatization is a social process set to exclude those who are perceived to be a potential source of disease and may pose th...
Article
Full-text available
Acid attack refers to the act of hurling acid or any other corrosive substance on a person with the intention of injuring, harming, maiming, disfiguring or killing. Despite the fact that the number of acid attack cases in India have been rising, a separate section for acid attacks was not included in the Indian Penal Code until the year 2013. Even...
Article
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Background and objectives: Suicidal behaviour has been a persistent concern in medical as well as general settings. Many psychotherapeutic approaches have tried to address suicidal behaviour in different ways. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have garnered much attention in the last decade because of their treatment efficacy. This systematic...
Article
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A child’s upbringing and importance of family as a social institution in shaping the personality of an individual has been highlighted in many studies. Children who lose their parents in an early age are vulnerable to stressful situations. However adaptive factors such as resilience and intelligence impact a child’s mental health positively. This s...
Article
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The authors present the lived experiences of the stigmatized castes in the context of the opportunities made available by the government of India for their Socio-Political Empowerment. The study aimed to gain an understanding about the respondents’ unique experiences of caste-based stigmatization at their workplace, their overall experience of empo...
Article
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From eve-teasing to more aggressive forms of sexual violence, subjection of women to sexual violence has been on the rise. One heinous form of sexual violence is the acid attack. Acid attack refers to the intentional act of throwing acid on an individual with the intent of harming, torturing, disfiguring, injuring, or killing them. Despite an incre...
Article
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The present study was conducted to see the impact of social support, social relations, and autonomy on happiness in intergenerational experiences. It also tried to examine the role of demographic variables (age, location and gender) on such experiences. The study involved a total of 185 participants from 48 families where each of the four members i...
Article
The paper presents a review of The Cambridge Handbook of the Psychology of Prejudice. The book has been edited by Fiona Kate Barlow and Chris G. Sibley published by Cambridge University Press in 2018. The first edition of the book came in 2017. The present is a concise student edition that serves as an effective resource for the holistic understand...
Article
Full-text available
Although considerable research has underscored the role of parental socialization practices in the character building of youth, an adequate assessment tool to evaluate the youth’s perception of these practices is not available. This study reports the development and validation of the Perceived Moral Socialization Scale (PMSS). This multidimensional...
Article
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The present paper purports to reflect on researcher’s journey in understanding the phenomenon of ambivalence and experiences associated. Failing to authenticate own understanding and positionality can reduce the credibility of qualitative work. But with continuous self-criticizing and evaluative mindset of the researchers a relatively bias-free qua...
Article
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The current study aims to examine adolescents across four countries - Zambia, Ghana, Argentina, and India -, regarding: a) mother-child relationship; b) father-child relationship; c) adolescents’ emotion regulation; and d) the relationship between mother-child/father-child close relationships and adolescents’ emotion regulation. Sex differences wer...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to explore and understand the phenomenon of stigmatization and socio-cultural process wherein a stigmatized group may enjoy the process of stigmatization against them. Generally, the research work on “stigma” shows that it has a negative effect on the concerned stigmatized group. These stigmatized groups opinioned the fact...
Article
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Parental socialization is one of the remarkable ways in which children begin to learn about right and wrong. Drawing on the relevant theoretical and empirical literature we look at the ways in which parent inculcate moral values in children. In particular, the study explores the parental practices and the characteristics of the parent-child relatio...
Article
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The study explored the role of moral identity (internalization and symbolization) in the civic engagement (attitude and behaviour) of youth through ethical ideology (idealism). A total of 217 individuals ( M = 22.5, SD = 3.4) comprising of 104 girls and 113 boys completed three scales, namely, moral identity scale, ethics position questionnaire (EP...
Article
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In an Indian family system ample number of studies done with more than generation residing together. They have highly focused on the role of intergenerational relations and parenting, in value transmission, offspring socialization and children development. But understanding the effect of parenting style on their children regarding intergenerational...
Poster
Full-text available
Patterns of Suicide: Role of Cultural and Social Factors
Chapter
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The paper aims to understand any concept, along with the dynamicity of culture, as culture free variable. This attempt is based on the basic debate of Cultural psychology, viz. how to study culture/how is internalization different from importation? The questions or rather points raised in this write up can be understood by taking values as an examp...
Article
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Violence against women, especially rapes, has been a pervasive problem in the society. It is well documented that victims of rape not only experience serious short and long-term psychological harm as a direct result of the assault, but may also be stigmatized by others (e.g., be blamed for not resisting enough). While there are sufficient studies i...
Article
Full-text available
Violence against women, especially rapes, has been a pervasive problem in the society. It is well documented that victims of rape not only experience serious short and long-term psychological harm as a direct result of the assault, but may also be stigmatized by others (e.g., be blamed for not resisting enough). While there are sufficient studies i...
Article
Full-text available
Tax is an important source of revenue for any government to achieve their goals of development, reducing poverty, providing public utilities and to create physical and social infrastructure to sustain the long term growth plan. A government especially of a developing economy constantly strives for achieving higher revenue to promote national econom...
Article
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The phenomena of intergenerational ambivalence are often explained in terms of autonomy versus dependency, conflicting norms between generation regarding role expectation in intergenerational relations, and there has been a tendency to believe these factors lead to intergenerational ambivalence. This article intends to explain the family interactio...
Article
Full-text available
Objective of the study was to see the pattern of suicide in Sikkim’s youth and to see the role of Psycho-Social factor in Suicide. For identifying the factors we used psycho autopsy as methodology and collect the data from the closet member of suicide victims. 25 sample was selected through purposive sampling method, and at last out of 25 sample 7...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this study is to develop and standardized a scale of Well-being in the context of intergenerational relations. Most of the researches in the area of intergenerational relations have studied well being as a concept which is represented in terms of Happiness, Life satisfaction or Physical health or Psychological health. However durin...
Article
Full-text available
The present study is an attempt to explore the patterns of intergenerational relations in Indian family, and the role of demographic variable (Age, Income, and Location) to determine the different patterns of intergenerational relations. Narrative was the method used in the study as a source of data collection and narrative were analyzed through St...
Article
Full-text available
In the present era India is facing rapid socioeconomic changes. Changes in the family pattern as well as values of society are the by product of this transition. The priorities of investment in monetary expenses as well as care and concern have also been changed. Traditionally the elderly enjoyed place of power and prestige, in the family. But the...
Article
Full-text available
The present study is an attempt to explore the experience of subjective well being and quality of life among working and Non-working elderly across rural and urban settings. The measures used in this study were P.G.I. health questionnaire, Satisfaction with life scale and Quality of life scale. Results show that elderly of this study have low level...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
India has changed a lot in the past years and still changes every coming hour. This change is from multiple dimensions not only benefitting the people but leading to violence, disruption, community riots, poverty and unemployment. The need of hour is to analyze these social problems. Social problems may emerge due to cultural lag or the urbanization and may cause immense dissatisfaction among the people. This type of unrest caused by the social problems requires as type of behavior or action from its citizens- the civic engagement. This ‘youth unrest’ refers to the collective dissatisfaction faced by the entire young population of a country. It may lead to their civic engagement. The notion of civic engagement can be understood as a broader concept including political, social, and moral involvement (Berger, 2009). In Berger´s (2009) view, social engagement is understood as a part of civic engagement, which is not necessarily related to political activity. However, social engagement may also be combined with political engagement or can serve as a resource that fosters or facilitates a political type of ‘engagement’ as “having an interest in, paying attention to, or having knowledge, beliefs, opinions, attitudes or feelings about either political or civic matters, whereas ‘participation’ is defined in terms of political and civic participatory behaviours” (Barrett, Brunton-Smith, 2014, p. 5). On the local level, civic engagement can have various forms, such as membership in local organizations, involvement in programmes organised by the municipality, or direct (political) involvement in municipal policy making and management. According to Barret and Brunton-Smith´s (2014) overview, forms of civic participation can include also informal assistance to the well-being of others in the community, community problemsolving through community organisations/membership of community organisations, membership of other non-political organisations (e.g. religious institutions, sports clubs, etc.) / attending meetings of these organisations and here expressing one's point, etc. Preferred, prevalent, and/or available forms of civic engagement are culture-specific and mutable over time. Many forms of political activity regarded as unconventional in the past, – for example, signing a petition or displaying bumper stickers, etc. – have now become more mainstream (Norris, 1999), more accessible and inclusive as a result. However, specific forms of participation and engagement may still depend on social class or a particular subculture (Vlachová & Lebeda, 2006), as well as on gender and age. India has developed a robust and sophisticated civil society with diverse civil society organizations providing opportunities for Youth Civic Participation as well as strong governmental frameworks supporting youth policies and Youth Civic Participation. There are a number of Indian CSOs and institutions providing opportunities for young people to engage with social issues in a variety of areas. These organizations’ strategies range from preparing young people for participation in local governance, to training them to run youth development organizations, to setting up youth resource centers. The family is widely regarded as a socializing agent and parents, in particular, are seen to play a pivotal role in providing their children with a framework for interpreting and navigating the social world. Bourdieu (1986) famously identified three dimensions of capital: economic, social and cultural, that are unequally distributed through society. These capitals, he argued, are accrued and passed down within families, in a process of social reproduction. Social reproduction is considered problematic because families are able to pass down particular class-based resources to their offspring thus perpetuating their advantage over others. In this part of family comprise the elderly- older member’s providing their own values and also pass on what they want the younger members to do. Aging is a natural process of becoming older and older. It is a universal reality. It is defined in different ways by different authors. Hess (1976) defines aging as “an inevitable and irreversible biological process of life. Handler (1960) views that “aging is the deterioration of a mature organism resulting from time-dependents, essentially irreversible changed intrinsic to all members of a species, such that, with the passage of time, they become increasingly unable to cope with the stresses of environment, thereby increasing the probability of death”. One of the most significant demographic changes of our time is the rapidly expanding number of older adults in the world population. In India, as well as in countries across the globe the population is aging very rapidly. The life expectancy level has also increased dramatically from the time of independence to the present, with further increases projected over the next two decades. The growing elderly segment of the population will likely introduce new societal challenges for providing this group with health care, financial assistance, and social and emotional support. The aging population trend, in conjunction with social and economic trends, is also ushering in new concerns about changing family values, living arrangements, and lifestyles to this youth civic engagement. These aging members from the youth will want them to follow certain forms of norms or values in acting upon the change they want to see. Elderly people’s perception on such youth civic actions help them to think and leads to a resolution of this final stage of Erikson’s model – providing the wisdom to the lesser experienced in forms of guidance, values or interventions. Analyzing the current social scenario of Indian social problems the older population can best provide knowledge as some of them have seen India transform since independence.
Project
The dynamics of intergenerational relationships have changed drastically in the past few decades, owing to the changing systems of living, advancing technology and many other social-cultural and economic factors. The traditional Indian perspective of life clearly demarcates the phases within a person’s life where the senescence is characterised by increasing detachment from the worldly matters and gradually moving away from the materialistic ways of living. However, these systems are now obsolete and we find increasing intergenerational interactions giving rise to the need for the study of the same. Increase in life-span has also contributed to the inter-generation contacts. For instance, in an office, we find as much as 4-5 generations working together in the same team. People work way into their 60s and young people have started seeking work from an early age. When such variety of views, opinions, needs and perspective come together, we see interesting patterns of interactions. Accommodation of these variety of views with each other brings us to the concept of Generational Intelligence which comes into play in these intergenerational interactions. Generation Intelligence has been defined as an ability to reflect and act, which draws on an understanding of one’s own and others’ life-course, family and social history, placed within its social and cultural context. (Biggs & Lowenstein, 2011). It facilitates the generation of a space wherein multiple generational viewpoint can be considered instead of focusing on just a single generation’s or person’s perspective. This allows for negotiations that are mutual and pragmatic in nature. This requires a sense of awareness about that the distinctions and similarities among individuals based on their age in order for negotiations to include generation specific needs and goals. The GI framework is described (Biggs et al., 2011, Biggs & Lowenstein, 2011) as a means of interpreting the degree of empathy arising between generational groups. It has arisen from debates in social gerontology that have attempted to understand relations between adult groups of different ages, in the context of social problems such as social ageism, intergenerational competition and elder abuse. It refers to intelligence that involves sensitisation towards the awareness of generation as a contributing factor in social situations and does not limit itself to a personality type found in one developmental phase. Without a doubt Generational intelligence provides for deeper understanding of one’s own self and therefore provides a means for being able to distinguish personal self from people of other age groups. It helps create a sense of acceptance for the fact that the needs and demands of others may vary from those of one’s self. It fosters empathic understanding between two different generations and helps them communicate or co-exist in the same environment, without feeling suffocated or inadequate. This develops relationships that are more open and comfortable and less critical of each other’s dissimilarities and age or space gap. It can also be understood as a process that may contribute to successful aging. The old and the elderly often find themselves unable to fit into the nuances of the younger generations and start perceiving themselves and their health as a burden. This results in them retreating into passivity and often, loneliness. However, according to the study by Haapala, Tervo and Biggs (2014) , the elderly were able to understand the young generation , based on their life-long experiences and when explained and taught about the concept of GI, and how every generation is unique due to their unique social settings and experiences, they were found to be more understanding towards the young people and the young people too were more patient with the care-taking of the elderly. Generationally aware individuals can work their differences in that the priorities and values of both generations are taken into account. When the young find themselves willing to be able to take care of the elderly as the process inculcates the fulfillment of some of their priority needs, the result is a win-win situation for both. The elderly are engaged and understand the differences in an empathic manner and even guide the younger ones based on their experiences. Such activity on the part of the elderly is indicative of successful aging.
Archived project
The objective of present study is to explore the experience, process and dynamics of male victimization and the causes and consequences of these kinds of oppressive acts against men. For understanding the phenomena of male victimization, a multi-method approach (qualitative and quantitative) has been adopted. The specific objectives were: 1. To explore misuse of laws against men and its’ psycho-social consequences. 2. To study the process of discrimination faced by men at workplace 3. To study how gender role prescriptions and demands limits one’s experience of authentic self as well as its expression. 4. To study social representation of “man” through analysis of media images, soap operas, movies and male characters of popular novels.