Sung-Ching Lee

Sung-Ching Lee
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Department of Geography

Doctor of Philosophy

About

25
Publications
4,331
Reads
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135
Citations
Introduction
As a climate scientist, I am broadly educated in the fields of biometeorology, micrometeorology, ecology science and atmospheric science. My research interests focus on understanding the role of natural ecosystems (e.g., forest and wetland) in mitigating the impacts of climate change through carbon sequestration. My research skills include nut no limit to eddy-covariance measurements, chamber measurements, stable isotope measurements, process-based models and statistical analysis.
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - present
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2014 - June 2020
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • Research Assistant
September 2013 - August 2014
National Taiwan University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2016 - August 2020
September 2014 - August 2016
September 2009 - June 2013
National Taiwan University
Field of study
  • Geography

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we quantified the ecosystem-scale CO2 exchange of two different but typical low-latitude vegetation types, para grass and reed, in a subtropical wetland ecosystem by integrating flux observation with the parameterization of environmental variables. In addition, we explored how seasonal dynamics of environmental factors affected varia...
Article
Full-text available
Many peatlands have been drained and harvested for peat mining, agriculture, and other purposes, which has turned them from carbon (C) sinks into C emitters. Rewetting of disturbed peatlands facilitates their ecological recovery and may help them revert to carbon dioxide (CO2) sinks. However, rewetting may also cause substantial emissions of the mo...
Article
Partitioning measured net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) into ecosystem respiration (Re) and gross primary production (GPP) is essential for understanding the biophysical controls on forest ecosystem carbon (C) dynamics. Obtaining Re and GPP accurately from NEE remains a challenge. In this study, we measured stable CO2 isotopologue signatures at e...
Article
Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests in the Pacific Northwest are the most productive managed forests in North America. Nitrogen (N) fertilizers are generally applied in this region to increase the rate of tree growth and consequently carbon (C) sequestration. However, the long-term effects of N fertilization on C and water exchanges of Doug...
Article
Area burned, number of fires, seasonal fire severity, and fire season length are all expected to increase in Canada, with largely unquantified ecosystem feedbacks. However, there are few observational studies measuring ecosystem-scale biogeochemical (e.g., carbon dioxide exchanges) and biophysical (e.g., energy partitioning) properties during smoke...
Preprint
Full-text available
Area burned, number of fires, seasonal fire severity, and fire season length are all expected to increase in Canada, with largely unquantified ecosystem feedbacks. However, there are few observational studies measuring the ecosystem‐scale biogeochemical and biophysical properties during smoke episodes, and hence accessing productivity effects of ch...
Article
Full-text available
Rewetting of disturbed peatlands is an important restoration strategy for climate change mitigation. Previous work primarily focuses on the biogeochemical processes altered by rewetting and few studies have investigated the biophysical impacts, which can diminish or amplify biogeochemical effects beyond the ecosystem scale. We used a paired flux to...
Article
We propose a gap-filling model for carbon dioxide fluxes measured by eddy covariance (EC) that combines the flux variance similarity (FVS) partitioning approach with the artificial neural network (ANN) technique (FVS–ANN). 18 years of EC-measured net ecosystem production (NEP) of a Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) stand in British Columbia, Cana...
Article
It is critical to have long-term carbon dioxide (CO2) flux observations in forest ecosystems to understand how changing climate can affect forest carbon (C) stocks and CO2 exchange between forests and the atmosphere. In this study, fifteen years (2002–2016) of continuous eddy-covariance flux and climate measurements in an intermediate-aged Douglas-...
Article
We are providing this correction to clarify and correct several details as originally presented in D'Acunha, Lee, and Johnson (). Figure in D'Acunha et al. () incorrectly presented the locations of the wells and piezometers monitored for groundwater level by the City of Delta. While the geographic coordinates given in Table of D'Acunha et al. () co...
Article
Full-text available
A short, but severe, wildfire smoke episode in July 2015, with an aerosol optical depth (AOD) approaching 9, is shown to strongly impact radiation budgets across four distinct land-use types (forest, field, urban and wetland). At three of the sites, impacts on the energy balance are also apparent, while the event also appears to elicit an ecosystem...
Article
Full-text available
A short, but severe, wildfire smoke episode in July 2015, with an aerosol optical depth (AOD) approaching nine, had a significant impact on air quality, radiation and energy budgets across four land use types, and elicited a clear ecosystem response with respect to carbon fluxes at a bog and a forested site. Greatest impacts on radiation and energy...
Article
Full-text available
Monitoring peatland restoration can be labor intensive, and monitoring activities can result in further disturbance, suggesting that remote sensing can play an important role in assessing ecosystem responses to restoration efforts. In this study, we assessed the response of plant phenological parameters for Burns Bog, a highly disturbed peatland in...
Article
Full-text available
Despite storing approximately half of the atmosphere’s carbon, estimates of fluxes between wetlands and atmosphere under current and future climates are associated with large uncertainties, and it remains a challenge to determine human impacts on the net greenhouse gas balance of wetlands at the global scale. In this study we demonstrate that the r...
Poster
Full-text available
Poster presentation for the American Geophysical Union fall meeting 2016
Article
Full-text available
Many peatlands have been drained and harvested for peat mining, which has turned them from carbon (C) sinks into C emitters. Rewetting of disturbed peatlands facilitates their ecological recovery, and may help them revert to carbon dioxide (CO2) sinks. However, rewetting may also cause substantial emissions of the more potent greenhouse gas (GHG) m...
Article
Full-text available
Rewetting can promote the ecological recovery of disturbed peatland ecosystems and may help to revert these ecosystems to carbon dioxide (CO2) sinks. However, rewetting of disturbed peatlands can also cause substantial emissions of methane (CH4) and possibly nitrous oxide (N2O). This study quantified summertime emissions of the three major long-liv...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Burns Bog Ecological Conservation Area, located in Delta, British Columbia, is one of the largest bogs in North America surrounded by urban development. Greenhouse gas exchanges in wetlands are an essential ecosystem service that mediate climate from a local scale. Bogs act as long-term carbon storages by sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2), but...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Burns Bog Ecological Conservancy Area (BBECA) in Metro Vancouver is a part of a large disturbed raised bog ecosystem that is currently being managed to promote ecological recovery through rewetting. Restoration efforts aimed at raising the water table through damming of drainage structures have been in place since 2005. This study quantified summer...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In recent years, though there were some studies on carbon budget for wetland ecosystems, most of them were conducted over northern peatlands, and very few attentions were given to tropical or subtropical estuarine wetland ecosystems. These are productive due to the regular input of nutrient, and estuaries are known to be significant sources of carb...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Part of the Burns Bog Ecological Conservancy Area (BBECA), a 20 km2 wetland in Metro Vancouver, BC, Canada, is currently undergoing restoration to promote its ecological recovery from past disturbances such as peat harvesting and associated drainage. The restoration management aims at raising the bog's water table by a large-scale ditch-blocking program to impede drainage. This rewetting of disturbed bog ecosystems may change emissions and uptake of long-lived atmospheric greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide or methane. This project performs long-term measurements of fluxes of methane and carbon-dioxide on a floating tower to retrieve emission estimates across seasons by means of eddy covariance (EC). Photos of the tower can be found here: https://flic.kr/s/aHsky46p9v