Sundeep Teki

Sundeep Teki
University of Oxford | OX · Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics

PhD

About

45
Publications
26,015
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1,945
Citations
Introduction
Sundeep Teki is a Sir Henry Wellcome Fellow at the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford. Sundeep does research on sound, timing, and sequence learning.

Publications

Publications (45)
Article
Full-text available
Music is a curious example of a temporally patterned acoustic stimulus, and a compelling pan-cultural phenomenon. This review strives to bring some insights from decades of music psychology and sensorimotor synchronization (SMS) literature into the mainstream auditory domain, arguing that musical rhythm perception is shaped in important ways by tem...
Article
Full-text available
Time is an important dimension of brain function, but little is yet known about the underlying cognitive principles and neurobiological mechanisms. The field of timing and time perception has witnessed tremendous growth and multidisciplinary interest in the recent years with the advent of modern neuroimaging and neurophysiological approaches. In th...
Article
Full-text available
To make sense of natural acoustic environments, listeners must parse complex mixtures of sounds that vary in frequency, space, and time. Emerging work suggests that, in addition to the well-studied spectral cues for segregation, sensitivity to temporal coherence—the coincidence of sound elements in and across time—is also critical for the perceptua...
Article
Full-text available
Perception of auditory time intervals is critical for accurate comprehension of natural sounds like speech and music. However, the neural substrates and mechanisms underlying the representation of time intervals in working memory are poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the brain bases of working memory for time intervals in rhythmic se...
Article
Full-text available
We recorded neural responses in human participants to three types of pitch-evoking regular stimuli at rates below and above the lower limit of pitch using magnetoencephalography (MEG). These bandpass filtered (1–4 kHz) stimuli were harmonic complex tones (HC), click trains (CT), and regular interval noise (RIN). Trials consisted of noise-regular-no...
Preprint
Full-text available
Withtheadventofsocialmedia,therehasbeenanextremely rapid increase in the content shared online. Consequently, the propagation of fake news and hostile messages on social media platforms has also skyrocketed. In this paper, we address the problem of detecting hostile and fake content in the Devanagari (Hindi) script as a multi-class, multi-label pro...
Preprint
Full-text available
The rapid advancement of technology in online communication via social media platforms has led to a prolific rise in the spread of misinformation and fake news. Fake news is especially rampant in the current COVID-19 pandemic, leading to people believing in false and potentially harmful claims and stories. Detecting fake news quickly can alleviate...
Preprint
Full-text available
Spoken language Identification (LID) systems are needed to identify the language(s) present in a given audio sample, and typically could be the first step in many speech processing related tasks such as automatic speech recognition (ASR). Automatic identification of the languages present in a speech signal is not only scientifically interesting, bu...
Article
Full-text available
Our ability to make sense of the auditory world results from neural processing that begins in the ear, goes through multiple subcortical areas, and continues in the cortex. The specific contribution of the auditory cortex to this chain of processing is far from understood. Although many of the properties of neurons in the auditory cortex resemble t...
Article
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Introduction Aphasia is one of the most disabling sequelae after stroke, occurring in 25%–40% of stroke survivors. However, there remains a lack of good evidence for the efficacy or mechanisms of speech comprehension rehabilitation. Trial Design This within-subjects trial tested two concurrent interventions in 20 patients with chronic aphasia with...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to predict the timing of natural sounds is essential for accurate comprehension of speech and music (Allman et al., 2014). Rhythmic activity in the beta range (12–30 Hz) is crucial for encoding the temporal structure of regular sound sequences (Fujioka et al., 2009, 2012; Bartolo et al., 2014; Teki, 2014; Bartolo and Merchant, 2015). Sp...
Article
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The importance of temporal expectation for sensory perception has been demonstrated across diverse paradigms and multiple modalities. Overall, the findings are consistent: temporal expectation results in greater encoding precision, higher perceptual sensitivity, and decreased response times during
Article
Full-text available
The human auditory system is adept at detecting sound sources of interest from a complex mixture of several other simultaneous sounds. The ability to selectively attend to the speech of one speaker whilst ignoring other speakers and background noise is of vital biological significance-the capacity to make sense of complex 'auditory scenes' is signi...
Article
The human auditory system is adept at detecting sound sources of interest from a complex mixture of several other simultaneous sounds. The ability to selectively attend to the speech of one speaker whilst ignoring other speakers and background noise is of vital biological significance-the capacity to make sense of complex 'auditory scenes' is signi...
Article
Full-text available
Time is an important dimension of brain function, but little is still known about the underlying cognitive principles and neurobiological mechanisms. The field of timing and time perception has witnessed rapid growth and multidisciplinary interest in the recent years with the advent of modern neuroimaging, neurophysiological and optogenetic tools....
Article
Perception of space is a multimodal construct and orienting our eyes towards a light, sound or touch occurs effortlessly, despite coordinate transformations that have to occur from head-based (sounds) or body-centred (touch) coordinates to eye-centred coordinates. One possible explanation for this effortless orientation behaviour is that space is c...
Article
Full-text available
We present an approach for combining high resolution MRI-based myelin mapping with functional information from electroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography (MEG). The main contribution to the primary currents detectable with EEG and MEG comes from ionic currents in the apical dendrites of cortical pyramidal cells, aligned perpendicular to...
Article
Full-text available
The brain can hold information about multiple objects in working memory. It is not known, however, whether intervals of time can be stored in memory as distinct items. Here, we developed a novel paradigm to examine temporal memory where listeners were required to reproduce the duration of a single probed interval from a sequence of intervals. We de...
Article
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Previous behavioural studies have shown that repeated presentation of a randomly chosen acoustic pattern leads to the unsupervised learning of some of its specific acoustic features. The objective of our study was to determine the neural substrate for the representation of freshly learnt acoustic patterns. Subjects first performed a behavioural tas...
Article
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Article
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Objective The brain bases of musical hallucinations (MH) is not understood. A major problem in this effort is the lack of a suitable method to experimentally manipulate MH during the course of experiment. In this work we present a method to systematically manipulate MH using an external masker stimulus. Furthermore, we make use of the manipulation...
Article
The aim of this study was to examine how auditory vowel processing by native (L1) and non-native (L2) speakers is reflected in their neuronal source architecture and in coupling between brain regions. We used the magnetic Mismatch Response/MMNm to test automatic brain responses to within- and between-category vowels with English controls and Englis...
Article
Full-text available
The brain can hold information about multiple environmental objects in working memory. It is not known, however, whether time intervals can be treated similarly as “sensory objects” and stored in memory as distinct items. Here, we designed a new paradigm to measure the precision of memory for time intervals. Listeners were required to remember and...
Article
Full-text available
Humans share with other animals an ability to measure the passage of physical time and subjectively experience a sense of time passing. Subjective time has hallmark qualities, akin to other senses, which can be accounted for by formal, psychological, and neurobiological models of the internal clock. These include first-order principles, such as cha...
Article
Humans share with other animals an ability to measure the passage of physical time and subjectively experience a sense of time passing. Subjective time has hallmark qualities, akin to other senses, which can be accounted for by formal, psychological, and neurobiological models of the internal clock. These include first-order principles, such as cha...
Article
Full-text available
The physiological basis for musical hallucinations (MH) is not understood. One obstacle to understanding has been the lack of a method to manipulate the intensity of hallucination during the course of experiment. Residual inhibition, transient suppression of a phantom percept after the offset of a masking stimulus, has been used in the study of tin...
Thesis
Full-text available
Natural auditory scenes consist of a rich variety of temporally overlapping sounds that originate from multiple sources and locations and are characterized by distinct acoustic features. It is an important biological task to analyze such complex scenes and extract sounds of interest. The thesis addresses this question, also known as the “cocktail p...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we used magnetoencephalography and a mismatch paradigm to investigate speech processing in stroke patients with auditory comprehension deficits and age-matched control subjects. We probed connectivity within and between the two temporal lobes in response to phonemic (different word) and acoustic (same word) oddballs using dynamic cau...
Article
Full-text available
A prevalent view of working memory (WM) considers it to be capacity-limited, fixed to a set number of items. However, recent shared resource models of WM have challenged this “quantized” account using measures of recall precision. Although this conceptual framework can account for several features of visual WM, it remains to be established whether...
Article
The physiological basis for musical hallucinations (MH) is not understood. One obstacle to understanding has been the lack of a method to manipulate the intensity of hallucination during the course of experiment. Residual inhibition, transient suppression of a phantom percept after the offset of a masking stimulus, has been used in the study of tin...
Article
Full-text available
In contrast to the complex acoustic environments we encounter everyday, most studies of auditory segregation have used relatively simple signals. Here, we synthesized a new stimulus to examine the detection of coherent patterns ('figures') from overlapping 'background' signals. In a series of experiments, we demonstrate that human listeners are rem...
Article
Full-text available
Magnetoencephalography studies in humans have shown word-selective activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) approximately 130 ms after word presentation ( Pammer et al. 2004; Cornelissen et al. 2009; Wheat et al. 2010). The role of this early frontal response is currently not known. We tested the hypothesis that the IFG provides top-down c...
Article
Full-text available
This study used magnetoencephalography to record oscillatory activity in a group of 17 patients with chronic tinnitus. Two methods, residual inhibition and residual excitation, were used to bring about transient changes in spontaneous tinnitus intensity in order to measure dynamic tinnitus correlates in individual patients. In residual inhibition,...
Article
Full-text available
Over a typical career piano tuners spend tens of thousands of hours exploring a specialized acoustic environment. Tuning requires accurate perception and adjustment of beats in two-note chords that serve as a navigational device to move between points in previously learned acoustic scenes. It is a two-stage process that depends on the following: fi...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate timing is an integral aspect of sensory and motor processes such as the perception of speech and music and the execution of skilled movement. Neuropsychological studies of time perception in patient groups and functional neuroimaging studies of timing in normal participants suggest common neural substrates for perceptual and motor timing....
Article
Full-text available
We have previously used direct electrode recordings in two human subjects to identify neural correlates of the perception of pitch (Griffiths, Kumar, Sedley et al., Direct recordings of pitch responses from human auditory cortex, Curr. Biol. 22 (2010), pp. 1128-1132). The present study was carried out to assess virtual-electrode measures of pitch p...
Article
Full-text available
Research on interval timing strongly implicates the cerebellum and the basal ganglia as part of the timing network of the brain. Here we tested the hypothesis that the brain uses differential timing mechanisms and networks--specifically, that the cerebellum subserves the perception of the absolute duration of time intervals, whereas the basal gangl...
Article
Full-text available
Auditory figure-ground segregation, listeners' ability to selectively hear out a sound of interest from a background of competing sounds, is a fundamental aspect of scene analysis. In contrast to the disordered acoustic environment we experience during everyday listening, most studies of auditory segregation have used relatively simple, temporally...
Article
Full-text available
The kinetics of GABAergic synaptic currents can vary by an order of magnitude depending on the cell type. The neurogliaform cell (NGFC) has recently been identified as a key generator of slow GABA(A) receptor-mediated volume transmission in the isocortex. However, the mechanisms underlying slow GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSCs and their use-dependen...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Timing Research Forum (TRF) is an open society for promoting multidisciplinary research on timing and time perception. Established in 2016 by Sundeep Teki and Argiro Vatakis, the aim of TRF is to bring together researchers with an interest in research on timing on a single platform and encourage open science and collaboration. TRF is already 400+ members strong and has ~150 subscribers on TRF's highly active Twitter and Facebook pages. TRF has a strong focus on ‘open science’ and members are encouraged to share relevant resources like code, stimuli, data and offer advice, mentorship and support to other researchers. We are also keen to involve the younger researchers at the doctoral and postdoctoral level to actively participate and take responsibilities for various TRF activities like newsletters, blog, and social media outreach. TRF COMMITTEE: Fuat Balci, Turkey Jennifer Coull, France Dean Buonomano, USA Anne Giersch, France Max Di Luca, UK Tim Griffiths, UK Jessica Grahn, Canada Marjan Jahanshahi, UK Deborah Harrington, USA Sonja Kotz, Netherlands Mehrdad Jazayeri, USA Hugo Merchant, Mexico Warren Meck, USA Marshall Hussain Shuler, USA Joseph Paton, Portugal Sundeep Teki, UK Hedderik van Rijn, Netherlands Argiro Vatakis, Greece Virginie van Wassenhove, France Marc Wittmann, Germany TRF CONFERENCE: TRF will organize annual conferences that will be unique in their format and focus. Firstly, we plan to have all aspects of timing research represented at TRF conferences, where diverse questions on the representation of time at distinct levels of understanding – from single cells to network-level understanding using neurophysiological recordings in animal models to behavioral, neuroimaging and neuro-stimulation approaches in humans during normal function and dysfunction in diseased states will be addressed. Secondly, every conference will address topical questions on timing through research talks and poster presentations but also an open discussion format where experts will be invited to offer their views that will inform the timing community of the current state-of-the-art. Thirdly, the conferences will actively promote the work of young scientists through dedicated sessions and make it easier for them to interact and network with senior investigators. The first TRF Conference will be organized by Jenny Coull and Anne Giersch and will be held in Strasbourg, France during October 23-25, 2017. Further conference details will be announced on the TRF website soon. JOINING TRF: Any academic with an interest in timing can become a member of TRF. Please follow the instructions here - http://timingforum.org/membership/ SPONSORSHIP: TRF is an open society with no membership fees. We are open to accepting sponsorship to help us maintain our website and support our annual conferences. Please visit this page for more details - http://timingforum.org/sponsorship/ FEEDBACK: For any comments or questions or to volunteer for TRF, please feel free to reach out to us. See contact details here - http://timingforum.org/contact/