Suganthi John

Suganthi John
University of Birmingham · English Language and Linguistics

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5
Publications
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361
Citations
Citations since 2017
0 Research Items
180 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023010203040

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
Contrasted with the more typical English bare noun forms of mass and proper nouns, bare singular count nouns comprise a problematic set for many descriptive grammars and thus for many second language learners. Although article usage is one of the trickiest areas of English as a Second Language (ESL) to master, bare noun phrases, and bare singulars...
Article
First person pronoun use in academic writing has received much attention from researchers over the past decade (Baynham (1999), Tang and John (1999), Kuo (1999), Ivanic and Camps (2001), Hyland (2001; 2002; 2004), Harwood (2005) and Koutsantoni (2003, 2007), to name a few). It is acknowledged as the most visible representation of the writer’s ident...
Article
Academic writing has traditionally been thought of as a convention-bound monolithic entity that involves distant, convoluted and impersonal prose. However, recent research has suggested a growing recognition that there is room for negotiation of identity within academic writing, and thus academic writing need not be totally devoid of a writer’s pre...

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Project (1)
Project
Digital genres are used by academics to meet the demands created by new ways of communication and collaboration, and especially as a means of strengthening their profile and increasing their visibility. In this project we look to broaden the knowlege of digital genres in English as manifestations of professional discoursal practices for international audiences in which the aim is to strengthen the visibility of research output and the credibility, reputation, and impact of the researchers.