Sue Walker

Sue Walker
University of Reading · Department of Typography and Graphic Communication

About

28
Publications
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155
Citations

Publications

Publications (28)
Book
This collection of essays explores the cultural significance of children’s reading by analyzing a series of Anglo-American case studies from the eighteenth century to the present. Marked by historical continuity and technological change, children’s reading proves to be a phenomenon with broad influence, one that shapes both the development of indiv...
Article
Health-related information design has made a difference to people’s lives through clear explanation of procedures, processes, disease prevention and maintenance. This paper provides an example of user-centered design being applied to engage people with the prevention of drug-resistant infection. In particular, we focus on antibiotic resistance in t...
Article
Full-text available
Both home sample collection and home testing using rapid point-of-care diagnostic devices can offer benefits over attending a clinic/hospital to be tested by a healthcare professional. Usability is critical to ensure that in-home sampling or testing by untrained users does not compromise analytical performance. Usability studies can be laborious an...
Article
This paper describes a research project in which information design, human factors, architecture and pharmacy academics worked with pharmacy professionals and pharmacy users to consider how to present information about antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in a community pharmacy setting. Project outcomes – as a result of an innovative design competition...
Article
Full-text available
Getting the message across about the dangers of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and how to prevent it is a global priority. This article discusses the role of information design in the effective communication of information about AMR, and suggests that the design process—user input, iteration and consideration of circumstances of use—is key to succe...
Chapter
This chapter describes the role of research in typography and graphic communication and in information design that is relevant to the design and use of materials for children’s reading. By ‘design’ in this context we mean ‘typography’ (which is the visual organisation of type and pictures on paper or screen), and ‘process’ (the ways in which design...
Article
This essay is about the contribution that typing manuals and typists have made to the history of graphic language and communication design, and that typewriter composition has played in typographic education and design practice, particularly in the 1960s and 1970s. The limited technical capabilities of typewriters are discussed in relation to the r...
Article
A review of the recent exhibition ‘Can graphic design save your life?’, curated by graphic designer Lucienne Roberts and design educator Rebecca Wright at the Wellcome Collection.
Book
This chapter describes the role of research in typography and graphic communication and in information design that is relevant to the design and use of materials for children’s reading. By ‘design’ in this context we mean ‘typography’ (which is the visual organisation of type and pictures on paper or screen), and ‘process’ (the ways in which design...
Article
This essay traces the development of Otto Neurath’s ideas that led to the publication of one of the first series of children’s books produced by the Isotype Institute in the late 1940s, the Visual History of Mankind. Described in its publicity material as ‘new in content’ and ‘new in method’, it embodied much of Otto Neurath’s thinking about visual...
Article
This paper describes two tests designed to find out whether children would be helped in their reading by the use of word and letter spacing that was looser or tighter than commonly used default values. In each test, 24 six-year-old children were asked to read aloud in a classroom; the realistic, high-quality test material was set using a range of e...
Article
This paper describes part of the work of the Typographic Design for Children project at The University of Reading. The aim was to ¦nd out whether children found serif or sans serif types easier or more difficult to read, and whether they found text with infant characters (e.g. variants of `a' and `g') easier or more difficult to read. We listened t...
Article
This paper describes part of the work of the Typographic Design for Children project at The University of Reading. The aim was to find out whether children found serif or sans serif types easier or more di'cult to read, and whether they found text with infant characters (e.g. variants of 'a' and 'g') easier or more di'cult to read. We listened to 6...
Article
This paper draws attention to design issues that are likely to affect the way that children interact with screen-based information texts. It is based on the findings of the Interactive Multimedia in Primary Schools (IMPS) project funded by the British Library, carried out at The University of Reading. The paper summarises the design-related aspects...
Article
Full-text available
This article charts some of the issues which emerged when an Urdu word processing package was introduced into an urban primary school in southern England. Drawing on observation and interviews with teachers, parents and children over a period of 15 months, it maps teachers' initial expectations and what was actually achieved. Benefits for bilingual...
Article
Full-text available
Word-processing in a language which uses non-Latin scripts is a relatively recent development in the UK. Nonetheless, early initiatives suggest that multilingual word-processing has a range of educational applications. It provides teachers with a cheap and semi-professional way of producing multilingual resources. It helps to raise the status of co...
Article
Full-text available
Changing populations in many parts of Europe and the English-speaking world have given rise to multilingual classrooms, new pedagogies and new learning materials. This paper discusses multilingual resources for children - books in languages other than English as well as dual language books written in both community (or heritage) languages and Engli...
Article
Full-text available
This topic was one of the focuses for The Multilingual Resources for Children Project undertaken at The University of Reading 1992–4. The aim of the Project was to investigate the nature and use of multilingual resources for reading, writing and speaking and listening in United Kingdom primary Schools. The languages the Project was concerned with –...
Book
Building bridges extends the debate on resources in multilingual classrooms in new directions. It focuses on the languages other than English that are most commonly spoken by British school children– Bengali, Chinese, Gujarati, Panjabi and Urdu; and it looks at ways in which decisions about language, typography, production and design affect both re...
Article
Full-text available
This article is a response to Grace Feuerverger's contribution in the current issue of Language and Education which describes a multicultural literacy intervention for minority students in Toronto. Whereas the use of multilingual resources is a recent phenomenon in Canada, British schools have been using such materials for over a decade. While agre...
Article
Notes changes in the visual organization of correspondence brought about by the typewriter. Discusses the development of these changes, drawing examples both from the prescriptions for and the practice of commercial correspondence. (FL)

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The Information Design and Architecture in Persuasive Pharmacy Spaces: combating AMR [IDAPPS] project, introduces ‘persuasive space’ in thinking about the presentation of information, its situation within an environment, and how users interact with it, in the context of a community pharmacy. Community pharmacies are socially inclusive and convenient, and today play a key role in delivering public health. They are places where people wait for prescriptions to be filled or to see a pharmacist, and offer a persuasive space to raise awareness of the dangers of AMR. The work done by Otto and Marie Neurath in the 1930s to raise aware¬ness of and support prevention of tuberculosis (TB) inspired our work. They produced a series of charts with striking and effective images based on consistent and carefully considered principles, for public display in schools and community centres. The Neuraths believed that the space in which the charts were read and used was important for their effective reception and understanding. This aligned with the notion of persuasive space in architecture, in particular a significant seam of work taking place in the 1930s in the early stages of modernism when functionalism came to the fore. IDAPPs considers this historical context studying graphic and information design in the nineteenth- and early-twentieth century used to tell people about, for example, TB, infection spread, and approaches to hygiene to combat bacterial infection. We use this information to inform ideas for the development of designs for a persuasive pharmacy space, also taking account of user-centred information design projects which patients, families, carers, health professionals and designers work together, and the integrating and participatory principles of human factors and ergonomics. IDAPPS has been designed to provoke and to generate ideas for future consideration. Through a competition, good practice report, and public exhibition, we anticipate a thriving legacy. A competition to design persuasive pharmacy space will comprise teams of information/graphic designers, architect or built environment profes¬sionals or researchers and pharmacy practitioners or researchers. It will result in the development of a winning prototype set up in a pharmacy. A report containing good practice guidelines for persuasive space in community pharmacies will contribute to expanding knowledge on the impact of the built environment and information design on wellbeing and education and will therefore be of interest to a wide variety of organisations. An exhibition will show examples of archival material to show how explanations and descriptions of AMR have been dealt with in the past, and the prototype design solutions. Funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.
Archived project
This project explored (a) the educational benefits of multilingual wordprocessing and (b) the issues which are raised in the design of multilingual resources for children.
Archived project
This EC funded project set out to design multimedia software for five European minority languages – Basque, Catalan, Frisian, Irish and Welsh.