Sue Dale Tunnicliffe

Sue Dale Tunnicliffe
University College London | UCL · Department of Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment

PhD

About

150
Publications
53,557
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
3,264
Citations
Introduction
How very young children interact, nterpret. develop skills in STEM actions in their play, free choice or with human constructed items, produced for play or everyday items, before they are in early years education.
Additional affiliations
September 2001 - present
University College London
Position
  • Reader in Science Eduation
Description
  • education
Education
October 1991 - December 1995
King's College London
Field of study
  • Science Education

Publications

Publications (150)
Chapter
Observing pre-school children playing in a free choice environment, either indoor or outside in the immediate area with whatever catches their attention or in settings with objects and activities provided (mediated play) where these emergent scientists are free to choose, that which do reveals the ability to observe and investigate with some planni...
Chapter
Experiences at the beginning of life form the basis for funds of knowledge of the emergent learners. In playing, these earliest of years children are observing and investigating from what they find out for themselves, forming their own interpretation of the world which they experience. Even before speaking they begin communicating to others. Once t...
Chapter
This introductory chapter provides an overview of the entire content of the book, Play and STEM Education in the Early Years: International Policies and Practices, providing various viewpoints representing 47 STEM experts from 16 countries defining developmental milestones during the early years and the importance of play during this critical devel...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter discusses the fascination of young children with animals; vertebrates and invertebrates. The information has been derived from research, observations and, in particular, the analysis of children’s drawings. Many formal science curricula for young children expect children to have some knowledge of animals when they begin school, so it i...
Article
Full-text available
Children are born to play and are born as intuitive scientists and use numeracy and literacy in their play. Playing is an essential apprenticeship for developing scientific (STEM) literacy. Observing children spontaneously playing reveals that they are experiencing STEM in action. They are observing phenomena, asking questions, solving problems, de...
Conference Paper
In the challenges facing an increasingly unsustainable world unless the inhabitants can nullify, at least to some extent, the effects of industrial development to become again a sustainable plane This is a challenge recognised particularly by the Commonwealth, celebrating its 70th anniversary this year. One of the passable remedies is the developme...
Conference Paper
Learning is socially constructed. At the present time there is an emphasis on interactive learning as well as the socio cultural aspects of learning. Dialogic talk is encouraged rather than what we, in England would term a didactic or declarative approach, talking facts at learners. Constructivism places importance on determining the learners exist...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on the responses of leisure visitors who had chosen to visit a museum with natural history dioramas. Different ‘voices’ are heard from different visitors and during a visit constituent members influence what each other says because constructing meaning about the world is a social activity but their a reflection on the experienc...
Chapter
Originally, natural history dioramas were a nineteenth century development, but they have evolved with the passage of time and changes in cultural norms in societies. More recently they focus on the changes during the Anthropocene era and how such information can be effectively accessed and understood by visitors. This chapter is the introduction t...
Chapter
Dioramas are an established form of exhibit in museums. From the early 1900s, with the passage of time and changes in cultural norms in societies, natural history dioramas evolved in response to the changes in entertainment, expectations and expressed needs of museum visitors. The challenge has always been to provide meaningful, relevant experience...
Chapter
Observing natural history dioramas provides learners with opportunities to identify various aspects of biological science, captured in the moment of time portrayed in a given diorama, such as behaviour, taxonomy, adaptation to the habitat including anatomical specialisations and camouflage colouring. However, such observations also afford opportuni...
Chapter
Observing natural history dioramas provides learners with opportunities to identify various aspects of biological science, captured in the moment of time portrayed in a given diorama, such as behaviour, taxonomy, adaptation to the habitat including anatomical specialisations and camouflage colouring. However, such observations also afford opportuni...
Book
This book focuses on socio-cultural issues and the potential of using dioramas in museums to engage various audiences with – and in – contemporary debates and big issues, which society and the natural environment are facing, such as biodiversity loss. From the early 1900s, with the passage of time and changes in cultural norms in societies, this ge...
Book
This book presents the history of natural history dioramas in museums, their building and science learning aspects, as well as current developments and their place in the visitor experience. From the early 1900s, with the passage of time and changes in cultural norms in societies, this genre of exhibits evolved in response to the changes in entert...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Children start learning biology long before they encounter formal educators, the requirements of the curriculum and the knowledge assessed on for school tests. The biology of the area where they live form most first experiences of the biology. The child is part of this biological world and various depictions of it are in many of the early years pic...
Article
Full-text available
Many children learn about and experience animals in the everyday environment where they live and attend school. One way to obtain information about children’s understanding of concepts or phenomena is by using their drawings in combination with written responses or interviews. This study assesses how much Slovenian students 10–15 years old (in sixt...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This communication fits into the theoretical framework of scientific literacy, which acknowledges argumentation and narrative as a core of ‘epistemic practice’ of science class. In this paper we propose to study the extent to which a collective discussion about the interpretation of a ‘realistic fiction’ storybook in science lesson can be a way to...
Conference Paper
Children are born into this world into a place and environment, and immediately start developing a personal ‘sense of place’. Through their gradual awareness of the immediate environment their knowledge and sense of this place extends. In the beginning, the ‘place’ is dependent on the earth science of our planet as has created the original environm...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Reading fictional picture books is a feature of early childhoods, with an adult or they look alone. In preschool and early years education such highly coloured illustrations are a feature of the story. These stories, such as The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Fish is fish, or Tadpole’ promise, were not written and illustrated by their authors-illustrator...
Article
Full-text available
The nature of scientific research goes beyond the learning of concepts and basic manipulation to the key factors of engaging students in identifying relevant evidence and reflecting on its interpretation. It is argued that young children have the ability to acquire viable realistic concepts of the living world when involved in relevant activities (...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter considers the remarks of school children taken on visits to animals as exhibits as revealed by analysis of their transcribed conversations and the effect of the adult with them aid wither they are in single gender for mixed groups. Some of their learning is in the home and their everyday surroundings, where they notice organism of thei...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter is about how children’s drawings convey their level of conceptual understanding of organisms. Drawings are a useful pedagogical tool as a window to investigate children’s conceptual knowledge and the meanings they give to this form of expression. We analyzed the drawings collected from pupils living in rural areas, towns, and suburban...
Chapter
There are a number of methods to obtain information about a person’s understanding of science (White & Gunston, 1992; Tunnicliffe & Reiss, 1999a). Drawings are considered one useful tool (Haney et al., 2004). Most techniques require respondents to talk or write their answers to questions. Osborne and Gilbert, 1980 used oral questions whilst written...
Book
Full-text available
This book argues for the essential use of drawing as a tool for science teaching and learning. The authors are working in schools, universities, and continual science learning (CSL) settings around the world. They have written of their experiences using a variety of prompts to encourage people to take pen to paper and draw their thinking – sometime...
Article
Full-text available
Trees are important to the environment owing to their ecological services. However, many aspects of their form and function are poorly understood by the public. From their earliest years, children have an elementary knowledge about plants which they gain from their everyday observations, their parents and other people and from their kindergarten an...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The research attempts to conceptualise natural history habitat dioramas as potential models for biological learning of local flora and fauna. A cohort of 9-year-old students from Malta was asked to draw in class a place with local animals and plants, another drawing at the NHM of Malta and a third drawing of their favourite habitat diorama. One-to-...
Conference Paper
Traditional view of science museums is that they present a static image of science, a fixed body. Visitors to museums come with pre-existing knowledge and frequently interpret that which they see but particular through using their Owen understanding referring to the labels and other interpretative means not only through the information provided by...
Article
Relatively little is known about the response of pupils of under eleven years and what they actually comment upon when observing live invertebrate animals and whether science inquiry skills ( Turner, 2012) could be met through such studies. I asked pupils from Year 2 and year 5, in small groups, mixed gender and mixed ability , allocated to groups...
Article
This small study conducted by an experienced First aid instructor and science educator sought to establish a baseline pilot study of what actions were observed and identified as injuries and subsequent first aid. A class of 29 four-year-old children were shown 8 nine inch tall Teddy Bears, dressed as World War I pilots. Each Teddy Bear with a simul...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Finding out about children’s ideas about biological phenomena is an important area of biological education research. One method of gathering data about children’s conceptions is through analysis of their drawings. Drawings are one of type of representation; they can be viewed as expressed models, generated from mental models – the personal cognitiv...
Article
We consider that natural history dioramas are one of the most effective museum exhibit genres for the teaching and learning of many aspects of biology. Dioramas have been, hitherto, a rather neglected area of museum exhibits, butaissance is beginning for them and their educational importance in contributing to peoples understanding of the natural w...
Article
People come to the museum to look at natural history dioramas with a wealth of previous relevant knowledge and experience as well as expectations, their entry narratives and agenda, which may differ amongst members of the same visiting group. These different contexts, which they bring with them as memories, form the entry voice of the visitor, the...
Book
This book brings together in a unique perspective aspects of natural history dioramas, their history, construction and rationale, interpretation and educational importance, from a number of different countries, from the west coast of the USA, across Europe to China.Itdescribes the journey of dioramas from their inception through development to visi...
Article
Full-text available
Children discover the world surrounding them from very early childhood, as they observe, listen and experience what is in their everyday environment. Plants, and trees in particular, are usually accessible and likely to be noticed because they are very common in our landscape. Whilst observing living things, these children construct a mental model,...
Article
Full-text available
Drawings can serve as a useful tool for analyzing children’s understanding of scientific phenomena. This study examined children’s understandings about internal structure of the snail. Children from kindergarten at age 5 and from primary school of age 7 and 10, were asked to draw their concept about the internal structure of the snail. The results...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In a German botanic garden, Kindergarten children were presented opportunities for first hand observations of plants. The experiences were facilitated by educators from the venue who did not instruct but provided challenges and supported the children during their investigations. We wanted to find out if this approach facilitated the development of...
Article
Full-text available
This paper combines 4 presentations making up a symposium. Inquiry-based learning in science has been advocated by the European Commission at both primary and secondary level of education (Rocard et al, 2007) However, changes in science pedagogy across Europe has proved to be a challenge. In addition cultural and linguistic contexts of learning and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper combines 4 presentations making up a symposium. Inquiry-based learning in science has been advocated by the European Commission at both primary and secondary level of education (Rocard et al, 2007) However, changes in science pedagogy across Europe has proved to be a challenge. In addition cultural and linguistic contexts of learning and...
Conference Paper
There is a worldwide call to increase the number of young people pursuing science later in their schooling and at University. However, the way in which (primary) science is taught leaves little room for inquiry based learning and the development of scientific literacy. This situation may have dulled students’ appetite for continuing with science an...
Chapter
Chapter 9 is a discussion of zoo education research and learning. In zoos, education is an umbrella word that encompasses the declarative approach of providing information in a didactic style, invitational labeling, interpretation, physically interactive exhibitry, aiding visitors in constructing an understanding of animals, developing the visitors...
Chapter
This chapter addresses the interactions between the exhibits (Zoo Voice) and the visitor (Visitor Voice). The first step in engaging a visitor is attracting them to an exhibit. The term exhibit is taken from the museum world where it is used to specify a stand-alone object and the display of an object within a setting. The Zoo Voice shapes the awar...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on the rationale behind the zoo field trip and the components of a successful zoo field trip design. There are five stages of a zoo visit that may be used as a framework for organizing a zoo field trip: (1) orientation, (2) concentrated or focused looking, (3) leisure looking, (4) completion, and (5) consolidation. The concentr...
Chapter
Even though research in how and what people learn in zoos has become a focus in the past 20 years, future research needs to evaluate the basic biology and conservation knowledge visitors bring to the zoo. If zoo education programs pose a better understanding of what children know and think about the roles and purposes of zoological institutions, th...
Chapter
Understanding the Visitor Voice is also important for teachers as they plan field trips. Therefore, Chap. 7 looks at the Visitor Voice by providing examples of conversations and identifying the important aspects of the conservations. During a zoo visit, the zoo conversations that take place are social but also include learning conversations. The le...
Chapter
Chapter 8 provides a look at the conversations that take place between parents/children, adults/children, chaperones/children, teachers/children, and children/children. The content of conversations may reveal the rationale for the zoo visit, what the visitors talk about, and more. Conversations are used for a variety of functions and particular fun...
Chapter
Understanding the historical development of zoos is an important aspect in defining their educational future. Therefore, this chapter provides a brief history of the available literature on zoo education, includes a condensed review of the development of zoological institutions from menageries to conservation centers, and defines the change of coll...
Book
This book recognises that children are in intuitive scientists and that most of our actions at home and in other settings have a scientific basis. It is through these early experiences that children formulate their ideas about the world around them. This book introduces the simplest form of the principles and the big ideas of science and provides a...
Data
Full-text available
There are two voices at zoos and aquariums, that of the visitor and that of the park itself. Through capturing and analyzing the conversations of visitors to each other, their voices can be understood. Such content can reveal the extent these visitors hear and assimilate the voice of the park presented through a variety of media, particularly graph...
Article
Full-text available
This article considers the knowledge students (ages 6, 10, and 15 years) have of animals from a crosscultural perspective. Students from six countries (Brazil, England, Finland, Iceland, Portugal, and the United States of America) were asked to free-list as many animals as possible and state where they had seen or learned about the animals. The res...
Article
Full-text available
This article considers the knowledge students (ages 6, 10, and 15 years) have of animals from a cross-cultural perspective. Students from six countries (Brazil, England, Finland, Iceland, Portugal, and the United States of America) were asked to free-list as many animals as possible and state where they had seen or learned about the animals. The re...
Chapter
This chapter builds on the previous chapters and explains the acquisition of appropriate knowledge and skills that visitors need in order to maximize the pedagogical and sociocultural benefits of a zoo visit. Moreover, this chapter provides suggestions for designing successful field trips. Zoo visits can be important in developing an understanding...
Chapter
Chapter 5 is an introduction to the visitors’ knowledge of animals. Because adults and children come to the zoo with ideas, information, and images of animals, zoos need to be aware of this knowledge. Zoos should enhance learning in a way that addresses visitors’ misconceptions about animals by identifying the misconceptions and challenging the per...
Chapter
This chapter looks at the stated goals of zoo mission statements and provides examples of how zoos are addressing their missions. Moreover, with the pressure of zoos to become biological conservation mentors, zoos assume five roles as the executor of the relationship between society and nature. First, zoos take on the role of the “model citizen” by...
Book
Full-text available
Founded on the premise that zoos are ‘bilingual’—that the zoo, in the shape of its staff and exhibits, and its visitors speak distinct languages—this enlightening analysis of the informal learning that occurs in zoos examines the ‘speech’ of exhibits and staff as well as the discourse of visitors beginning in the earliest years. Using real-life con...
Article
Argues that biology should be learnt in the living world not in the classroom. Field ecological education is essential. Ecology is ideal candidate for implementing proposed transformations in science curricula. Ecology education is the missing link in educational reform . Crucial in developing biological literacy for citizens
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated whether listening to spontaneous conversations of elementary students and their teachers/chaperones, while they were visiting a zoo, affected preservice elementary teachers’ conceptions about planning a field trip to the zoo. One hundred five preservice elementary teachers designed field trips prior to and after listening to...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract A diorama is a careful positioning of a number of museum objects in a naturalistic setting. While expensive to construct, dioramas offer tremendous potential as educational tools. The education literature on dioramas, while growing, is still slight. Here we focus on dioramas as sites for learning science, specifically biology. We examine t...
Article
Full-text available
Children from England and the United States of America have a basic similar knowledge of plants and animals, which they observe during their everyday life. Nine children of ages 4, 6, 8, and 10years, in each country, were asked to free-list plants and animals. Afterwards, they were interviewed individually about the plants and animals they listed t...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the attitudes and achievements 13/14-year-old pupils’ in palaeontology with respect to school type, gender and pupils’ perception of palaeontology teacher. Palaeontology provides important evidence to support the theory of evolution thus it is important for science educator to understand the attitudes held by their pupils in...
Article
Full-text available
Children learn to recognise animals from their earliest years through actual sightings in their own observations of their world, but also through second-hand representations in various forms of media. Young learners begin with a template specimen to which they refer when they see another animal that resembles it, naming the animal accordingly. Grad...
Article
This article considers the knowledge students (ages 6, 10, and 15 years) have of animals from a cross-cultural perspective. Students from six countries (Brazil, England, Finland, Iceland, Portugal, and the United States of America) were asked to free-list as many animals as possible and state where they had seen or learned about the animals. The re...
Article
Full-text available
Children's understanding about animal internal structure can be affected by several factors which are poorly understoodby teachers. We conducted a large sample study (n=702) of children aged 6–16 years (Grades 1-9) examining children's responses to animals of various size, species and dimensions (2D and 3D objects), and exploring factors which migh...
Article
Full-text available
The study examines the interests and attitudes of school students toward biology: through their interest in out-of-school activities and their attitude towards lessons as measured by interest, importance and difficulty. Biology lessons were relatively popular with the greatest preference found among students learning zoology. Girls showed significa...
Article
Primary school pupils in the UK today may be less familiar with natural objects, less exposed to formal natural history teaching and have less time given to school-based observation and discussion of natural objects. This study of children's responses to a ‘Nature Table’ of displayed natural objects was designed to assess pupils' knowledge of those...
Article
This study considers the analysis of the content of the conversations of primary school groups at the animated dinosaur models in The Natural History Museum, London. The results are compared with those of the conversations of similar school groups collected at the preserved animal specimens in the museum, and live animals at London Zoo. Particular...
Article
Full-text available
Having pets at home provides various social, health, and educational benefits to children. The question of how keeping pets at home affects the attitudes of children toward wild animals still has not been answered, due to various methodological issues, such as ignorance of some attitude dimensions and/or questionnaires that include items focused on...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to report United States of America (USA) science teachers' understandings of the internal structures of the human body. The 71 science teachers who participated in this study attended a frog/pig, two-hour dissection workshop at the 2004 National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) conference in Atlanta, Georgia. The st...
Article
Leslie S Jones & Michael J Reiss (Editors) Peter Lang Publishing ISBN: 9780820470801 £15.00 232pp Reviewed by David Slingsby
Article
Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Nancy Harrison Grosset and Dunlap ISBN 0448437643 £3.36 112pp Reviewed by Sue Dale Tunnicliffe99% Ape — How evolution adds up Jonathan Silvertown (Editor) Natural History Museum / Open University ISBN: 9780565092313 £14.99 224pp Reviewed by Alan CadoganThis Thing of Darkness Harry Thompson Headline Publishing (H/bc...
Article
Full-text available
Children's knowledge about human anatomy can be examined through several different ways. Making a drawing of the internal features of the human body has been frequently used in recent studies. However, there might be a serious difference in results obtained from a general instruction to students (What you think is inside your body) and specific (e....
Article
Young Maltese children have experience and knowledge of animals. We explored the range of animal with which they are familiar and the origin of this knowledge. The children interviewed were in Pre School, aged 4 years, and in the first year of compulsory education, aged 5 years Verb 1 questions and photographs were used as the probe to access under...