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Stuart William Shulman

Stuart William Shulman
Texifter · Discovery

PhD
I am in year 12 working on DiscoverText.com while providing free access and methods training to any academic researcher.

About

57
Publications
49,894
Reads
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1,581
Citations
Introduction
Inventor, entrepreneur, US Soccer National C licensed coach, proud dad, CEO @texifter, inventor of DiscoverText.com, and Taoist garlic grower. Formerly a Research Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and founding Director of the Qualitative Data Analysis Program (QDAP) at the University of Pittsburgh and at UMass Amherst. Dr. Shulman is Editor Emeritus of the Journal of Information Technology & Politics.

Publications

Publications (57)
Article
Full-text available
Software to support qualitative research is both revered and reviled. Over the last few decades,users and skeptics have made competing claims about the utility, usability and ultimate impact ofcommercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software packages. This paper provides an overview of thedebate and introduces a new web-based Coding Analysis Toolkit (CAT)....
Article
Full-text available
This case study describes a two-year (five semester) analysis of service-learning lab reflections from university students in a mid-sized private Midwest university who tutored senior citizens in computer and technology skills on a weekly basis, in order to empower seniors as digital citizens. Consequentially, students reported empowerment, as part...
Article
Technology Literacy with a Service-Learning Approach. " Dr. Shulman is collaborating with several federal agencies to assess the impact of e-Rulemaking. He leads yearly summer study seminars in Washington DC that bring undergraduates to federal agencies to discuss the administrative process.
Conference Paper
This tutorial provides software training in "DiscoverText," which is text analytic software developed by Professor Shulman. His work advances text mining, social media, and natural language processing research. The software training links these worlds via easy to understand explanations of software features that can be tailored for all experience l...
Conference Paper
This tutorial provides software training in "DiscoverText," which is a powerful, text analytic software developed by Professor Shulman. His work advances text mining and natural language processing research. The software training will link these worlds via straightforward and easy to understand explanations of software features that can be tailored...
Article
Full-text available
Both candidates and voters have increased their use of the Internet for political campaigns. Candidates have adopted many internet tools, including social networking websites, for the purposes of communicating with constituents and voters, collecting ...
Chapter
Full-text available
An essential, and rapidly-developing, aspect of electronic government is the growing use of online resources for government activities such as e-rulemaking, citizen participation, and the provision of information, referral, and assistance for users with needs for service delivery. Major developments in the use of electronic government resources for...
Chapter
Full-text available
An essential, and rapidly-developing, aspect of electronic government is the growing use of online resources for government activities such as e-rulemaking, citizen participation, and the provision of information, referral, and assistance for users with needs for service delivery. Major developments in the use of electronic government resources for...
Article
Full-text available
Large-scale e-mail campaigns are a staple in the modern environmental movement. Interest groups increasingly use online mobilizations as a way to raise awareness, money, and membership. There are legitimate political, economic, and organizational reasons for doing so, but these gains may come at the expense of a more substantial and efficacious rol...
Article
Full-text available
An essential, and rapidly-developing, aspect of electronic government is the growing use of online resources for government activities such as e-rulemaking, citizen participation, and the provision of information, referral, and assistance for users with needs for service delivery. Major developments in the use of electronic government resources for...
Article
Full-text available
Notice and comment rulemaking is central to how U.S. federal agencies craft new regulation. E-rulemaking, the process of soliciting and considering public comments that are submitted electronically, poses a challenge for agencies. The large volume of comments received makes it difficult to distill and address the most substantive concerns of the pu...
Article
Full-text available
Deliberative democratic theorists and public participation scholars have become increasingly interested in institutionalized forms of citizen discourse with the state, including those facilitated by information technology. However, there have been very few empirical studies of the claims that the Internet will make public participation more inclusi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Large-scale, email public comment campaigns in the United States necessitate the creation of new, specially tailored power tools for language. We call these applications "tools for rules". This paper introduces the rule writers' workbench, a system developed specifically for dealing with the influx of public comments. We describe the context in whi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The topic of “eRulemaking” (electronic rulemaking) has gained prominence in the Digital Government research community and with personnel working in the federal government. Over the past five years, with funding from the Digital Government program, government officials, citizens, activists, business leaders, and a range of scholars from several disc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To understand the subjective documents, for example, public comments on the government's proposed regulation, opinion identification and classification is required. Rather than classifying documents or sentences into binary polarities as in much previous work, we identify the main claim or assertion of the writer and classify it into the predefined...
Article
Full-text available
Mass e-mail campaigns are the organizational tool of choice for environmental activists seeking to inform and mobilize their constituencies. Some democratic theorists and reformers pin their hopes for more responsive and informed government policy on Internet-enhanced dialogue and debate. Electronic advocacy campaigns and action alerts are changing...
Article
A large interagency group led by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has worked diligently to set up a centralized docket system for all U.S. federal rulemaking agencies. The result, the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS), is still a work in progress, reflecting technical, administrative, financial, and political challenges. A close exam...
Chapter
Full-text available
A structural equation model analysis of data from a 2003 national random sample survey (n = 478) on information technology (IT) reveals important direct and indirect effects of generational demographic and attitudinal differences on electronic forms of political participation. Younger respondents reported more support for IT and fewer technological...
Article
Full-text available
Deliberative democratic theorists and public participation scholars have become increasingly interested in institutionalized forms of citizen discourse with the state, including those facilitated by information technology. However, there have been very few empirical studies of the claims that the Internet will make public participation more inclusi...
Article
Full-text available
We hypothesize that recent uses of the Internet as a public-participation mechanism in the United States fail to overcome the adversarial culture that characterizes the American regulatory process. Although the Internet has the potential to facilitate deliberative processes that could result in more widespread public involvement, greater transparen...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This brief white paper reports several findings from a National Science Foundation-funded study (SES-0322622) examining the deliberative potential of Internet-enhanced public participation in U.S. federal rulemaking. The complete survey (n=1,553), which compares both electronic and paper commenters, as well as form letter submitters and writers of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Large volume public comment campaigns and web portals that encourage the public to customize form letters produce many near-duplicate documents, which increases processing and storage costs, but is rarely a serious problem. A more serious concern is that form letter customizations can include substantive issues that agencies are likely to overlook....
Article
Full-text available
In our analysis of e-political participation among a 2003-random sample survey of 478 respondents drawn from Iowa, Pennsylvania and Colorado, six blocks of variables were entered: (1) socio-demographic (2) place effects, (3) voting, (4) technology use (VCR, cell phone, etc.) and computer apathy, (5) attitudes toward technology and (6) specific uses...
Article
A structural equation model analysis of data from a 2003 national random sample survey (n = 478) on informational technology (IT) reveals important direct and indirect effects of generational demographic and attitudinal differences on electronic forms of political participation. Younger respondents reported more support for IT and fewer technologic...
Conference Paper
Recently, the move from paper to electronic public comments makes it much easier for individuals to customize form letters while harder for agencies to identify substantive information since there are many near-duplicate comments that express the same viewpoint in slightly different language. The identification of exact- and near-duplicate texts, a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To support rule-writers, we are developing techniques to automatically analyze large number of public comments on proposed regulations. A document is analyzed in various ways including argument structure, topics, and opinions. The individual results are integrated into a unified output. The experiments reported here were performed on comments submi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this project, we are developing new text processing tools that help people perform advanced analysis of large collections of text commentary. This problem is increasingly faced by the U.S. federal government's regulation writers who formulate the rules and regulations that define the details of laws enacted by Congress. Our research focuses on t...
Article
Full-text available
This article is a primer on the emerging role for Information Technology (IT) in the Environmental Justice (EJ) movement. It explores current and potential uses of IT by EJ organisations fighting to protect vulnerable local environments and it addresses some of the barriers to more widespread movement efficacy via e-advocacy. We argue a chief but n...
Article
Full-text available
A rich and challenging dialogue about the shape of eRulemaking is underway. While in its infancy, an interdisciplinary research community has formed to assess and inform the development of information technologies that serve the public and rule writers. To date, little is actually known about whether this transition is likely to benefit or degrade...
Article
Full-text available
Results of data from a 2003 national computer-assisted telephone interview random sample survey (n= 478 completed surveys were returned) are reported. Adult respondents living in Colorado, Iowa, and Pennsylvania were eligible for participation. Of respondents 55 and older, 49% had a home computer, 46% used e-mail, and 43% used the Internet. For sen...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we report data collected through a survey of 1,553 recent participants in regulatory rulemaking public comment processes. Our analysis focuses on the differences between those who used newly available electronic tools and those who mailed or faxed letters on paper and also between those who submitted original letters and those who sub...
Conference Paper
The goal of this Birds of a Feather session is to discuss current and proposed strategies for creating new, interdisciplinary digital government curricula. Bring your success and horror stories, as well as your hopes and fears.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this project, we are developing new text processing tools that help people perform advanced analysis of large collections of text commentary. This problem is increasingly faced by the United States federal government's regulation writers who formulate the rules and regulations that define the details of laws enacted by Congress. Our research foc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This research note highlights salient findings from a web survey conducted during 2004 as part of a multi-year effort to better understand the views of diverse stakeholders in the development of a government-wide electronic rulemaking system. We report both quantitative and qualitative results that indicate a rough consensus about the desired scope...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of information and communication technologies has the potential to revolutionize citizen participation in the democratic process. The Internet, in particular, could vastly expand the number of citizens who participate in the 'notice and comment' process established by the Administrative Procedure Act. Some policy analysts and scholars...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This short Project Highlight presents a year-end summary of a collaborative small grant for exploratory research. It relates the background and scope of current research plans by the eRulemaking Research Group. Finally, this Project Highlight notes the challenges for collaboration between social and information scientists.
Article
Full-text available
This study presents results from a 2002 Midwest urban random sample survey (N = 167 adults). It is proposed that attitudes toward technology have a direct impact on digital citizenry and are colored by racial and educational differences. A path model showed several key results. Desire for computer skills increased among respondents with lower level...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A structural equation model analysis of data from a 2003 national random sample survey (n = 478) on informational technology (IT) reveals important direct and indirect effects of generational demographic and attitudinal differences on electronic forms of political participation. Younger respondents reported more support for IT and fewer technologic...
Article
Full-text available
Results of data from a 2003 national computer-assisted telephone interview random sample survey (n = 478 completed surveys were returned) are reported. Adult respondents living in Colorado, Iowa, and Pennsylvania were eligible for participation. Of respondents 55 and older, 49% had a home computer, 46% used e-mail, and 43% used the Internet. For se...
Article
Full-text available
Digital communications technology isreconfiguring democratic governance. Federalagencies increasingly rely on Internet-basedapplications to improve citizen-governmentinteraction. Early efforts in the area ofdigital government have created newparticipatory opportunities as well asformidable governance challenges. Federalagencies are working within a...
Conference Paper
The "e-Government and Public Policy" BoF Session had 20 attendees from a wide range of academic and public sector positions. Much of the discussion centered on the role for public participation and increased information availability in decision-making. Participants raised theoretical and practical concerns about the volume, nature, and efficacy of...
Article
Full-text available
This article proposes a social science research agenda that will reflect on and inform the development of new information technology-based approaches to the electronic collection, distribution, synthesis. and analysis of public commentary in the regulatory rulemaking process. It identifies one critical area of an ongoing governance transformation:...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As part of a National Science Foundation-funded study, we analyze data from a 2002 Midwest urban random sample survey (n = 167 adults) of differential access to and uses of computer technology. Factor analysis revealed three dimensions of attitudes toward technology (desire for computer skills, information power, computer use) and two factors regar...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper reports preliminary first year results from an "itr"-funded National Science Foundation (NSF) grant enabling two central Iowa universities--Drake and Iowa State--to assess the efficacy of service-learning interventions in the dissemination of Information Technology Literacy (ITL) beyond the campus gates. It introduces service-learning, a...
Article
Full-text available
During the Progressive era, an urban-agrarian wing of the conservation movement made soil fertility a highly salient issue in the press. This article examines the extent and causes of a convergence of urban-agrarian concern between 1907 and 1916, which was one of the first sustainable agriculture policy networks in United States history. Businessme...
Article
In this project, we are developing new text processing tools that help people perform advanced analysis of large collections of text commentary. This problem is increasingly faced by the U.S. federal government's regulation writers who formulate the rules and regulations that define the details of laws enacted by Congress. Our research focuses on t...
Article
Digital communications technology is changing democratic governance (CEG 2001). Federal agencies are deploying new technologies to improve citizen/government interaction during the regulatory rulemaking process. In a "Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies" released by the White House on December 17, 1999, the President call...
Article
Digital disparity exists among those who differ in socioeconomic status, educational background, gender, race, and age. As part of a digital citizenship course, students in a private midwestern university participated in a semester service-learning lab tutoring senior citizens about Information Technology (IT). Students studied the ethics of volunt...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Implement a system for ranking coders to enhance machine-learning.