Stuart Church

Stuart Church
University of Bristol | UB · Department of Computer Science

PhD

About

22
Publications
1,657
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1,177
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 1996 - July 2001
University of Bristol
July 1993 - July 1996
University of Southampton

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Publisher Summary Birds can see ultraviolet (UV) light because, unlike humans, their lenses and other ocular media transmit UV, and they possess a class of photoreceptor, which is maximally sensitive to violet or UV light, depending on the species. Birds have a tetrachromatic color space, as compared to the trichromacy of humans. Birds, along with...
Article
Full-text available
The function of avian ultraviolet (UV) vision is only just beginning to be understood. One plausible hypothesis is that UV vision enhances the foraging ability of birds. To test this, we carried out behavioural experiments using wild-caught blue tits foraging for cabbage moth and winter moth caterpillars on natural and artificial backgrounds. The l...
Article
We investigated the benefits of larval cannibalism in the Neotropical mosquito Trichoprosopon digitatum. The clutch size of the mosquito in the field was strongly correlated with adult female size, indicating a fitness advantage to being large. In controlled laboratory experiments, we compared the survivorship and eventual adult sizes of larvae tha...
Article
The effects of age, size, food availability and relatedness on larval cannibalism in the Neotropical mosquito Trichoprosopon digitatum were investigated. The eggs of this mosquito are laid in small water receptacles and guarded by females until they hatch. No significant differences in the median level of cannibalism were detected between larvae of...
Article
Some fish, including the guppy, have the ability to perceive ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. Female guppies prefer to associate with males that are viewed under light conditions that include UV-A, in preference to conditions lacking these wavelengths. We used reflexion spectrophotometry to show that male guppies reflect UV light from both their struc...
Article
Full-text available
In November 2020, a meeting was held to explore what citizen science practitioners can gain from understanding engagement, marketing, and volunteer motivations in order to benefit recruitment and retention in environmental citizen science. This report summarises the lessons learned from considering the role of people as participants within citizen...
Article
Preferences for common food types (‘apostatic selection’) have been demonstrated in a wide variety of vertebrate predators, yet there are few examples of preferences for rare food types (‘anti-apostatic selection’). Anti-apostatic selection is predicted to occur when, among other things, there are nutritional benefits to be gained from the consumpt...
Article
The Asian musk shrew Suncus murinus is an invasive predator that has had a considerable impact on biodiversity. An eradication was attempted from Ile aux Aigrettes, a 25-ha island reserve off the coast of Mauritius as part of a wider restoration program. A total of 759 shrews were removed using up to 1112 live-traps, in six trapping sweeps of the i...
Article
The spectral composition of the light environment can have important implications for visually mediated behaviours. We examined how spectral irradiance influences the behaviour of guppies foraging for live zooplankton prey. Daphnia are semitransparent, transmitting human-visible wavelengths but absorbing strongly in the ultraviolet (UV). We first t...
Article
Many animals have sensitivity to the e-vector of linearly polarised light, which may assist in visually mediated behaviours such as navigation, signalling and foraging. However, it is still controversial as to whether birds possess polarisation sensitivity. Several studies have found that altering the polarisation patterns of the broad visual field...
Article
It is well established that ultraviolet sensitivity plays an important role in the visually guided behaviour of birds. From a foraging perspective, evidence now exists that ultraviolet wavelengths are used by birds when foraging for insects, berries, seeds and mammals. Here, we present the results of two laboratory experiments that test the effect...
Article
There is growing evidence that ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths play an important role in avian mate choice. One of the first experiments to support this idea showed that female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) prefer UV-reflecting males to males whose ultraviolet reflection has been removed. The effect was very strong despite little or no UV reflec...
Article
Recent research has highlighted the extent to which birds utilise ultraviolet vision in mate choice and foraging. However, neither the importance of the ultraviolet compared with other regions of the visual spectrum nor the use of wavelength cues in other visual tasks have been explored. We assessed the individual choices of zebra finches (Taeniopy...
Article
Video playback potentially allows the presentation, manipulation, and replication of realistic moving visual stimuli, in a way that is impossible with real animals or static dummies, and difficult even with mechanical models. However, there are special problems attached to the use of this technology; this article concentrates on the problem of accu...
Article
Kin selection theory suggests that cannibalism is more likely to spread and be maintained if cannibalism of close relatives can be preferentially avoided. One important group of insects in which kin discrimination might be expected to evolve is cannibalistic tree-hole mosquitoes. Larvae of these species develop in small, ephemeral water bodies, whe...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the fact that the vast majority of natural prey items are dispersed in a non-random manner, few studies of frequency-dependent selective predation have explicitly examined the effect of prey dispersion on selectivity. We examined the effect of prey dispersion on the direction and strength of frequency-dependent selection by wild birds feedi...
Article
Preferences for common food types ('apostatic selection') have been demonstrated in a wide variety of vertebrate predators, yet there are few examples of preferences for rare food types ('anti-apostatic selection'). Anti-apostatic selection is predicted to occur when, among other things, there are nutritional benefits to be gained from the consumpt...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Southampton, 1994.
Article
Taps were recorded from 46 male and 30 female deathwatch beetles, Xestobium rufovillosum.Beetles tap by striking the frons of the head on the substrate 4–11 times, at a frequency of about 11 Hz. There were no significant differences between the sexes in the number of strikes per tap, or in the frequency of the strikes, although there was significan...

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