Storm B. Martin

Storm B. Martin
Murdoch University · Centre for Sustainable Aquatic Ecosystems

About

17
Publications
2,506
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
201
Citations

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
A new cryptogonimid trematode, Siphoderina hustoni n. sp. , is reported, collected off Lizard Island, Queensland, Australia, from the Maori snapper Lutjanus rivulatus (Cuvier). The new species is moderately distinctive within the genus. It is larger and more elongate than most other species of Siphoderina Manter, 1934, has the shortest forebody of...
Article
Full-text available
We report eight species of Lintonium from tetraodontiform fishes from Australian waters and describe six of them as new. Two species are described from tetraodontids from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR): Lintonium kostadinovaen. sp. from Arothron nigropunctatus (Bloch & Schneider) and Arothron hispidus (Linnaeus); and Lintonium dronenin. sp. from A. n...
Article
Full-text available
The Monorchiidae Odhner, 1911 are well represented in tropical and subtropical marine fishes worldwide but rarely reported from the Lutjanidae, an important family of tropical fishes that prey mainly on demersal fishes, decapods and cephalopods. Here, we report the first monorchiid from a lutjanid in Australian waters, Retroporomonorchis pansho n....
Article
Full-text available
Carbonate budgets are increasingly being used as a key metric to establish reef condition. To better understand spatial variations in framework and sediment net carbonate budgets, we quantified biogenic carbonate production, erosion, and dissolution within and between five distinct geomorphological habitats of Heron Reef on the southern Great Barri...
Article
The bumphead parrotfish, Bolbometopon muricatum, is an iconic and ecologically significant species that is vulnerable to extinction. Although the Great Barrier Reef provides extensive habitat for this species, the scarcity of juvenile fish in this region may suggest that these populations rely on colonisation by adults from further north, rather th...
Article
Metacercariae of trematodes belonging to the family Opecoelidae were collected from small fishes of the Great Barrier Reef: a blenniid, two gobiids, two labrids, three pomacentrids, a monacanthid, an ostraciid and the epaulette shark, Hemiscyllium ocellatum. Sequences of the second internal transcribed spacer region (ITS2) of ribosomal DNA were gen...
Article
The Pseudoplagioporinae n. subf. (Opecoelidae) is proposed for species of Pseudoplagioporus Yamaguti, 1938, Fairfaxia Cribb, 1989, and Shimazuia Cribb, 2005, a small group of relatively distinctive, Indo‐West Pacific taxa reliably known almost entirely from emperor fishes (Perciformes: Lethrinidae). These taxa were previously recognized in the Plag...
Article
We report on Scorpidotrema longistipes and two new species belonging to a new genus: Holsworthotrema enboubal ichthys gen. et sp. nov. and Holsworthotrema chaoderma sp. nov. These taxa are the first representatives of the subfamily Stenakrinae included in molecular phylogenetic analyses of the Opecoelidae. They resolve among the deep-sea + freshwat...
Article
Full-text available
Opistholebetine opecoelids are reported following examination of 1,041 individual tetraodontiform fishes, comprising 60 species and seven families, collected in Australian waters between 1986 and 2018. Nine species consistent with Opistholebes Nicoll, 1915, Heterolebes Ozaki, 1935 or Maculifer Nicoll, 1915 were recovered. However, phylogenetic anal...
Article
Podocotyloides stenometra Pritchard, 1966 (Digenea: Opecoelidae) is the only trematode known to infect anthozoan corals. It causes disease in coral polyps of the genus Porites Link (Scleractinia: Poritidae) and its life-cycle depends on ingestion of these polyps by butterflyfishes (Perciformes: Chaetodontidae). This species has been reported throug...
Article
Full-text available
Choerodonicola Cribb, 2005 is a minor genus of opecoelid trematodes defined for species with exceptionally small eggs but otherwise generalised morphology. Four species are currently recognised, all from fishes collected in Japanese waters but each from different perciform families: a labrid, a scarid, a sparid and pinguipeds. We report on a new sp...
Article
Full-text available
The Opecoelidae Ozaki, 1925, the largest trematode family, currently lacks an adequate subfamilial organisation. In particular, recent analyses have shown that the sequenced representatives of the Opistholebetinae Fukui, 1929 are nested among taxa currently recognised in the Plagioporinae Manter, 1947, which itself is polyphyletic. The concept of t...
Article
Full-text available
Despite morphological and ecological inconsistencies among species, all plagioporine opecoelids with a pedunculate ventral sucker are currently considered to belong in the genus Podocotyloides Yamaguti, 1934. We revise the genus based on combined morphological and phylogenetic analyses of novel material collected from haemulid fishes in Queensland...
Article
The present concept of the trematode genus Hamacreadium Linton, 1910 encompasses considerable morphological variability and includes species reported from a broad range of fishes. These include herbivores and planktivores, despite the life-cycle of the type-species, Hamacreadium mutabile Linton, 1910, being known to use fishes as intermediate hosts...
Article
Full-text available
A new opecoelid trematode is reported from fishes of the Lethrinidae, Lutjanidae and Nemipteridae off Lizard Island on the northern Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The new species keys to Neolebouria Gibson, 1976 and shows strong similarity to several species of that genus, but is not consistent with the type-species, N. georgiensis Gibson, 1976, or...
Article
Full-text available
The Indo-west Pacific is a marine bioregion stretching from the east coast of Africa to Hawaii, French Polynesia and Easter Island. An assessment of the literature from the region found reports of 2,582 trematode species infecting 1,485 fish species. Reports are concentrated in larger fishes, undoubtedly reflecting the tendency for larger hosts to...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Marine parasites are key components of natural ecosystems and significant pathogens of commercial species. Despite their importance, they remain poorly studied in Australia. This Australian Biological Resources Study funded project focuses on the parasites of commercially important fishes of Moreton Bay (Queensland) with the aims of improving the understanding of parasites from a commercial perspective (product quality, pathogenesis, value in stock assessment, human health and environmental monitoring) and improving our taxonomic understanding of a poorly understood component of the Australian fauna.