Steven N. Winter

Steven N. Winter
Washington State University | WSU · Department of Veterinary Microbiology & Pathology (VMP)

Master of Science ⋅ PhD Student
Current PhD Student at WSU studying treponeme-associated hoof disease in Washington elk populations.

About

6
Publications
1,042
Reads
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38
Citations
Citations since 2016
6 Research Items
38 Citations
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Introduction
I'm a PhD student applying landscape ecology and spatial epidemiology methods to understand the recently emerging treponeme-associated hoof disease (elk hoof disease) in free-ranging elk in the PNW. I am working under the supervision of Drs. Margaret Wild and Pilar Fernandez at Washington State University. After my PhD, I hope to continue researching emerging diseases in mammalian communities based at a government science agency.
Additional affiliations
April 2018 - December 2018
The Ohio State University
Position
  • Technician
Description
  • Monitored long-term population dynamics of coyotes and other mesocarnivores (e.g., raccoons, opossums), white-tailed deer, and rodents in the Chicago metropolitan area. Responsible for animal capture and assessing movement and behavior.
November 2017 - March 2018
Missouri Department of Conservation
Position
  • Technician
Description
  • Monitored long-term population dynamics of eastern wild turkeys in northeast Missouri. Responsible for capturing turkeys via rocket netting, banding and fitting radio-transmitters on turkeys.
April 2017 - October 2017
United States Geological Survey
Position
  • Technician
Description
  • Assessment of bubonic plague treatment in its sylvatic cycle. Responsible for capture, handling, chemical immobilization, and biometry of black-tailed prairie dogs and small mammals in Badlands National Park.
Education
January 2021 - January 2025
Washington State University
Field of study
  • Veterinary Science, Immunology and Infectious Diseases
January 2019 - December 2020
August 2012 - May 2016
University of Delaware
Field of study
  • Wildlife Ecology and Conservation

Publications

Publications (6)
Chapter
Full-text available
Characteristic of the Anthropocene, human impacts have resulted in worldwide losses in forested land cover, which can directly and indirectly drive biodiversity loss. The global illicit drug trade is one source of deforestation directly implicated with habitat loss in Central America, typically for drug trafficking and livestock production for mone...
Article
Full-text available
A novel hoof disease of elk (Cervus elaphus) was described in southwestern Washington, US, in 2008 and was subsequently diagnosed in an adjacent area in northwestern Oregon in 2014. The disease, currently referred to as treponeme-associated hoof disease (TAHD), is characterized by lesions ranging from mild erosions, to severe ulcers with underrunni...
Article
Full-text available
Many infectious diseases in wildlife occur under quantifiable landscape ecological patterns useful in facilitating epidemiological surveillance and management, though little is known about prion diseases. Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a fatal prion disease of the deer family Cervidae, currently affects white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) po...
Thesis
Full-text available
Wildlife diseases often occur under quantifiable and consistent patterns, which can be understood to statistically predict their occurrence and spread across landscapes. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a neurodegenerative disease in the deer family Cervidae caused by a prion, a pathogenic and misfolded variant of a naturally occurring protein. Man...
Article
Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an infectious and fatal prion disease occurring in the family Cervidae. To update the research community regarding the status quo of CWD epidemiologic models, we conducted a meta-analysis on CWD research. We collected data from peer-reviewed articles published since 1980, when CWD was first diagnosed, until December...
Article
Prions are misfolded infectious proteins responsible for a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases termed transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion diseases. Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is the prion disease with the highest spillover potential, affecting at least seven Cervidae (deer) species. The zoonotic potential of CWD is inconclusiv...

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