Steven Seegel

Steven Seegel
University of Texas at Austin | UT · Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies

Ph.D., History, Brown University (2006)

About

32
Publications
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39
Citations
Introduction
Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of Map Men: Transnational Lives and Deaths of Geographers in the Making of East Central Europe (University of Chicago Press, 2018). He has also published Ukraine under Western Eyes (Harvard University Press, 2013), and Mapping Europe's Borderlands: Russian Cartography in the Age of Empire (University of Chicago Press, 2012).

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
Kreślarze ojczyzn: Geografowie i granice międzywojennej Europy. By Maciej Górny. Warsaw: Instytut Historii PAN, 2017. 264 pages. Notes. Bibliography. Index. Illustrations. Maps. 42.00 PLN, paper. - Lokalność i nacjonalizm: Społeczności wiejskie w Galicji Wschodniej w dwudziestoleciu międzywojennym. By Olga Linkiewicz. Cracow: Universitas, 2018. 362...
Article
Full-text available
Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands: Kyiv, 1800–1905. By Serhiy Bilenky. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2018. xxii, 489 pages. Appendix. Notes. Bibliography. Index. Illustrations. Photographs. Figures. Tables. Maps. $95.00, hard bound. - Volume 78 Issue 2 - Steven Seegel
Article
Full-text available
The simplest purpose of a map is a rational one: to educate, to solve a problem, to point someone in the right direction. Maps shape and communicate information, for the sake of improved orientation. But maps exist for states as well as individuals, and they need to be interpreted as expressions of power and knowledge, as Steven Seegel makes clear...
Article
Full-text available
Главные достоинства работы Дариуса Сталюнаса Создавая русских: идея и практика русификации в Литве и Беларуси после 1863 г. Стивен Сигель видит в новаторском рассмотрении плюралистичности проектов имперской бюрократии по созданию лояльных идентичностей в Северо-западном крае, с одной стороны, и в оригинальной и глубокой трактовке русификаторской по...
Article
Full-text available
В конце XIX века картографы Габсбургской и Российской империй принадлежали к общему “империуму знания”, в котором особая ценность отводилась государственным ресурсам. Процесс геополитического конструирования посредством создания географических карт интеллектуально и политически был связан с практиками европейского государственного управления и с эп...

Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/M/bo27760776.html More than just colorful clickbait or pragmatic city grids, maps are often deeply emotional tales: of political projects gone wrong, budding relationships that failed, and countries that vanished. In Map Men, Steven Seegel takes us through some of these historical dramas with a detailed look at the maps that made and unmade the world of East Central Europe through a long continuum of world war and revolution. As a collective biography of five prominent geographers between 1870 and 1950—Albrecht Penck, Eugeniusz Romer, Stepan Rudnyts’kyi, Isaiah Bowman, and Count Pál Teleki—Map Men reexamines the deep emotions, textures of friendship, and multigenerational sagas behind these influential maps. Taking us deep into cartographical archives, Seegel recreates the public and private worlds of these five mapmakers, who interacted with and influenced one another even as they played key roles in defining and redefining borders, territories, nations­—and, ultimately, the interconnection of the world through two World Wars. Throughout, he examines the transnational nature of these processes and addresses weighty questions about the causes and consequences of the World Wars, the rise of Nazism and Stalinism, and the reasons why East Central Europe became the fault line of these world-changing developments. At a time when East Central Europe has surged back into geopolitical consciousness, Map Men offers a timely and important look at the historical origins of how the region was defined—and the key people who helped define it.