Steven H Pearson

Steven H Pearson
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation · Division of Lands and Forests/ Bureau of Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health

Ph.D.

About

11
Publications
2,674
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87
Citations
Introduction
Steven H Pearson works at the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. As a Research Scientist. Steven researches aquatic invasive species abundance, distribution, life history traits, control and management. His most recent publications surround the ecology or diamondback terrapins in Louisiana. In the coming months and years he is planning on publishing on the impacts of invasive flora and fauna to native species in the northeast United States.
Additional affiliations
June 2013 - January 2015
Independent Researcher
Independent Researcher
Position
  • Biologist Supervisor
September 2009 - June 2013
Drexel University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Taught raboratory and recitation for freshman Biology Courses. Taught laboratory and recitation for an upper level Vertebrate Morphology, Form and Function course
July 2007 - June 2012
Drexel University
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2007 - June 2013
Drexel University
Field of study
  • Environmental Science
September 2000 - May 2003
Stockton University
Field of study
  • Major: Environmental Studies, Minor: Mathematics

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
The timing of reproductive cycles in reptiles is often linked to environmental correlates, including temperature and photoperiod. The Diamondback Terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) is a wide-ranging species that occurs across multiple climatic regions over the eastern and Gulf coastal areas of the United States. Therefore, the species may show variatio...
Article
Full-text available
Diamondback Terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) are an ecologically important species in salt marsh habitats, and they occur along the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic coastlines of the United States. Terrapins are subjected to a myriad of threats including loss of coastal marsh/nesting habitat and differential adult mortality in fisheries bycatch. In L...
Article
Full-text available
Malaclemys terrapin inhabits salt marshes of the coastal United States and has been historically divided into seven subspecies. Two of the described subspecies, M. t. pileata and M. t. littoralis, occur along the western and eastern coastlines of Louisiana, respectively. To better understand potential boundaries of these two subspecies, we document...
Article
Diamond-Backed Terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) are emydid turtles found in estuarine systems along the Gulf and Atlantic coasts of the United States between Texas and Massachusetts, and in Bermuda. Reductions in many terrapin populations have been documented throughout the species' range in association with habitat loss, overharvesting for consumpt...
Article
Diamond-backed terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) are coastally distributed between south central Texas in the Gulf of Mexico along the Gulf and Atlantic Coast north through Massachusetts. Throughout their range many different biotic and abiotic factors have been shown to influence terrapin abundance, distribution and nesting success. Louisiana Depart...
Article
Full-text available
Previous population genetic studies of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) have typically focused on either the entire range or relatively small spatial scales. The Louisiana coastline contains vast salt marshes suitable for terrapins; however, two major freshwater inputs (Atchafalaya River and Mississippi River Deltas) break up the seeming...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat degradation and species introductions are two of the leading causes of species declines on a global scale. Invasive species negatively impact native species through predation and competition for limited resources. The impacts of invasive species may be increased in habitats where habitat degradation is higher due to reductions of prey abund...
Data
Plant species documented during the 2010 resource availability surveys. Plant species found only at FM and SLNC are on the left and right, respectively, while species found at both wetlands are in the center. We documented 31 species at FM and 51 species at SLNC. (DOCX)
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Invasive species have affected populations and communities worldwide through predation and competition for limited resources. Globally, the invasive red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans) is hypothesized to compete with native turtles for limited food and spatial resources. In the Mid-Atlantic region of th...

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