Steven A. Moore

Steven A. Moore
University of Texas at Austin | UT · School of Architecture

Doctor of Philosophy

About

85
Publications
30,918
Reads
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963
Citations
Citations since 2016
10 Research Items
516 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Additional affiliations
September 2006 - present
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • Bartlett Cocke Regents Professor of Architecture and Planning
Description
  • Director, Graduate Program in Sustainable Design
September 2001 - September 2006
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
September 1997 - September 2001
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
August 1993 - August 1997
Texas A&M University
Field of study
  • Architecture
September 1990 - May 1991
Harvard University
Field of study
  • Architecture
September 1962 - May 1967
Syracuse University
Field of study
  • Architecture

Publications

Publications (85)
Method
This is a methodology developed in the context of a comparative study about redevelopment (upgrading, regeneration, housing “rehab”) in established informal settlements in Sao Paulo, Brazil. It provides a multi-scalar approach to analyzing the nexus of housing types that concentrate in settlements that have been redeveloped.
Article
This article is a theoretical, hypothesis-building exercise to be subsequently tested at the Solutions-Driven Community Center (SDCC) in Austin, TX. We argue, as pragmatists generally do, that the most useful knowledge is produced in action, rather than by reasoning. If this premise is granted, it follows that the Modern division of labor is also t...
Article
The purpose of this article is to reconsider the concept of progress in the context of educational colonialism in Bangladesh. It attempts to interpret contemporary conditions concerning progress in architectural education in light of a conceptual framework underpinned by two sets of terms borrowed from Freire, and Altbach and Kelly, and updated. Ba...
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What has been the trajectory of architectural research in the UK (as reflected in arq: Architectural Research Quarterly ) as compared to the United States (as reflected in the Journal of Architectural Education , or JAE ) over the past two decades? To answer this question several quantitative methods were used to construct a frame analysis of the v...
Technical Report
This report was prepared at the conclusion of a two-year study about the sociotechnical impacts of slum upgrading in informal settlements in São Paulo, Brazil
Article
Using historical, theoretical and empirical methods, this article examines the relationship between knowledge, education, and power in the production of the built environment of North America. Public Interest Design (PID) is examined as a method that challenges conventional modes of production by hybridizing formal and experiential knowledge, thus...
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With hindsight it is easy to say that Scott Campbell’s 1996 essay, “Green Cities, Growing Cities, Just Cities: Urban planning and the contradiction of sustainable development,” has proved to be a seminal text. By this term I mean its date of publication can now be referred to as both reflecting and contributing to a “paradigm shift” (Kuhn 1962). Be...
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1. Introdução Uma das intenções deste artigo é testar o conceito de mu-dança ecosociotécnica. Mais curto e menos inclusivo, o termo mudança " sociotécnica " (Trist, 1951; Misa, 1987) tem sido usado por várias décadas na área dos Estudos de Ciência e Tecnologia, ou ECT. Ao combinar em um único termo os con-ceitos de mudança social e mudança tecnológ...
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En este artículo examino el proceso del cambio ecosociotécnico en la Zona Fronteriza de los Estados Unidos y México. Bajo el término “cambio ecosociotécnico”, propongo que no se puede considerar el cambio ecológico sin considerar también el cambio social y tecnológico. La misma limitación se encuentra en las tres variables primarias en el sistema e...
Chapter
There may be no designer alive who would not claim to serve the public interest. The problem is, then, three-fold: (1) who gets to define that term; (2) how do we implement the preferred definition; and (3) how do we evaluate the artifacts produced in a manner that informs ever-evolving definitions? In this brief essay I attempt to answer all three...
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A basic epistemological conflict is found to exist between modern and non-modern practitioners of sustainable development. These categories distinguish the ways professionals interpret or frame reality. The hypothesis developed is that this inconsistency, at least partially, explains the limited success that energy-efficiency research has realized...
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A basic epistemological conflict is found to exist between modern and nonmodern practitioners of sustainable development. These categories distinguish the ways professionals interpret, or frame reality. The hypothesis developed is that this inconsistency, at least partially, explains the limited success that energy-efficiency research has realized...
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Full-text available
The editors of this volume stated quite clearly in their query that the concept of sustainability is a highly “contested concept,” one that relies on “a remarkably diverse constellation of ideas.” There is little disagreement here. Elsewhere I have made the same argument—holding that a fundamental benefit of the sustainability discourse is its very...
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In this chapter we argue that architectural judgment is best understood and practiced as a public conversation through which we shape our material, social and ecological conditions. We also hold that the qualitative and quantitative assessment tools of conventional architectural judgment have generally failed to stimulate the public conversations r...
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Social housing in the United States is generally viewed as an unfortunate, yet necessary public entitlement required to keep poor citizens from becoming burdens in other ways to the more affluent citizens who pay taxes. This view derives from the utilitarian philosophical assumptions that are the basis of the US Constitution itself. This article re...
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Brazil has been criticized for its long-standing tradition of appropriating ideas “out of place” and applying them toward socially and technologically inappropriate ends. In this paper, we trace the influence of American Pragmatism on Brazilian architecture education and present the TGI – Interdisciplinary Graduation Project – as a unique outcome o...
Book
The book shines light on the problem of judgment, particularly in the realm of architectural –technics— and the codes that regulate it. The struggle to define –sustainability,— and thus judge architecture through such lenses, is but one dimension of the contemporary problem of judgment. By providing the reader with an inherently interdisciplinary s...
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Building codes are both an index of social values and a strategy to enforce those values. On these grounds an examination is made of the emergence of green building codes in North America as a category of building codes that is particularly important for sustainable development. The classical defi nition of sustainability proposes that multiple, co...
Chapter
Small robotic appliances are beginning the process of home automation. Following the lead of the affective computing movement begun by Professor Rosalind Picard in 1995 at the MIT Media lab, roboticists have also begun pursuing affective robotics, robotics that uses simulated emotions and other human expressions and body language to help the machin...
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In this chapter we offer a framework for thinking about the design of technology. Our approach draws on critical perspectives from both social theory and science and technology studies (STS). We understand design to be the process of consciously shaping an artifact to adapt it to specific goals and environments. Our framework conceptualizes design...
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The advent of genetic technologies has sparked a variety of questions about their legal, ethical, and social consequences. Issues of discrimination, better medicine, moral status, access, familial obligations, ethnic affiliations, and parental duties are discussed in relation to genetic testing, gene transfer, and genetic enhancement. In the midst...
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The idea that human beings are imperfect is very old. But now, for the first time in history, some people, mainly scientists, have the previously unimaginable power to modify human beings. Redesigning humankind is, generally speaking, the result of a techno-scientific complex called “converging technologies”, and made up of biotechnologies, informa...
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Design describes intellectual activity that differs across disciplines. This chapter argues for differentiation into engineering, architecture, or other types of design before any general conceptualization. Studies about the ‘dual nature of artifacts’ concern engineering design. The transferability of philosophical concepts from these studies to ot...
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In this chapter, we first consider the growing cultural significance of software as a motive for having a closer look at software production. We then show how networked computing has stimulated new practices of technical creation that question the traditional logic of engineering; open source software development serves as an example. Consequently,...
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In this chapter, I consider the relationship between the aesthetic appreciation of the built environment and the aesthetic appreciation of the natural environment, with an eye to pursuing its implications for the role of design in urban planning. In section 1, I describe some ways of thinking about the aesthetic, common in traditional environmental...
Chapter
Technological design is usually considered as a process of stipulating target functions. Technological artifacts are, however, not determined entirely by the intent of the engineers who designed them: they unavoidably contain unpredictable and uncertain characters that transcend engineers’ intent, and they cannot be understood purely from a functio...
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A core issue in the philosophy of technology has been the non-neutrality of technology. Most scholars in the field agree that technologies actively help to shape culture and society, rather than being neutral means for realizing human ends. How to take seriously this non-neutrality of technology in ethics? Engineering ethics mainly focuses on the m...
Chapter
Much has been written, especially in the United States, about the crisis of cities, about the many problems facing our largely automobiled cities. This is not the crisis of the late 1970s. It is not the crisis of cities burning, runaway inflation and cultural “malaise.” Rather, the crisis is described as one of sprawl, loss of farm and wilderness l...
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It has been argued that technical artifacts are a special category of objects that require a combination of the physical and intentional ‘descriptions of the world’. In this chapter, I question this point of view. Any object can figure in the intentional actions of some person, for example as being used for a purpose. A more interesting question is...
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The evolution of technical artifacts is often seen as radically different from the evolution of biological species. Technical artifacts are normally understood to result from the purposive intelligence of designers whereas biological species and organisms are held to have resulted from evolution by natural selection. But could it be that technology...
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Most literary critics have abandoned the notion that the meaning of a text lies in the intention of the author and have called this the “intentional fallacy.” I hold that there is a parallel found in many interpretations of technology design and call it the “designer fallacy.” This chapter, through examining a wide series of historical technology d...
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The problem examined in this chapter is found in the relationship between technological experts and the societies they serve. We have narrowed this overly broad topic to consider how some expert designers – architects in this case – influence public perceptions of reality. Architects necessarily edit reality when making drawings that represent the...
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The present collection of essays provides an overview of current work by philosophers and ethicists on the design process and its products. We have collected a group of essays on topics which are not usually considered together. The volume contains essays on engineering and architecture, focusing on a broad spectrum of items, ranging from cars to s...
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Systems methodology comprises approaches to systems analysis on the one hand, and systems engineering on the other. Systems analysis develops an understanding of a system, its elements, and its environment that describes their functional, structural, and behavioral aspects. Systems engineering transforms operational user needs into system architect...
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Much of how humans think about their world and their actions in relation to it is governed by the manner of their speaking. In this paper the authors argue that this has an especially significant impact on the work of engineers and their perception of ethical responsibility. A discourse framework governing the actions of engineers which focuses on...
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In speaking of ideas at the intersection of transhumanism, advanced robotics, and related fields, I wish to provide a few theoretical elements necessary for addressing questions like “Should we redesign humans?” While some find such a question somewhat out of place, others seriously think of alternatives to their present ways of life, even if they...
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This chapter describes how the stance of the architect relative to the culture of production changed over time, and how that change has affected the quality of the built world. The profession of architecture as we know it today emerged during the nineteenth century, as the process of designing buildings split from the process of building them. This...
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Technical artifacts are embedded in social systems and, to some extent, even shape them. This chapter inquires, then, whether designing artifacts may be regarded as a contribution to social design. I explicate a concept of general design that conceives design as the type fixation of a complex entity. This allows for an analysis of different contrib...
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In an earlier piece (Pitt, 2006b) I contrasted criteria for successful design in architecture with that in engineering. I argued there, among other things, that with the advent of “postmodern historicism” in architecture, beginning in the 1970s with the work of Venturi, there ceased to be operative criteria to evaluate architectural design and I ma...
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Günther Anders was speaking for the age of nuclear weapons when he noted that technological capabilities exceed human comprehension. Genetically modified organisms, pervasive computing in smart environments, and envisioned nanotechnological applications pose a similar challenge; powerful technological interventions elude comprehension if only by be...
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Twentieth century social science developed penetrating analyses of formal and informal institutions on many levels, yet both philosophers and specialists in design have yet to avail themselves of the implications that these analyses have for understanding the technological transformation of the material world. Three ideas from institutional theory...
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In this chapter, I argue for an intentionalist reconstruction of artifact design, called the “use-plan analysis.” In it, design crucially involves the construction and communication of a use plan. After presenting an outline of the use-plan analysis, I show that it can be used to accommodate four aspects of the phenomenology of artifact use and des...
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Engineers make decisions concerning ethical issues like safety and sustainability in design processes. We argue that the way in which engineers deal with such ethical issues depends on the kind of design process they carry out. Vincenti distinguishes between normal and radical design. In normal design processes the operational principle and normal...
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Proposals for regionalist architecture have appeared regularly in architectural discourse since the seventeenth century. Central to this discourse are shifting attitudes toward the core concepts of technology and place. Moderns, it seems, tend to value technology and devalue place. Postmoderns do the opposite—they value place and devalue technology...
Book
This volume provides the reader with an integrated overview of state-of-the-art research in philosophy and ethics of design in engineering and architecture. It contains twenty-five essays that focus on engineering designing in its traditional sense, on designing in novel engineering domains, including ICT, genetics, and nanotechnology, designing of...
Article
There has been little emphasis in STS scholarship to date on the design of the built environment. This paper attempts to address this oversight by examining alternative design practices in the growing field of sustainable architecture. We propose a geohistorical framework that includes three design dispositions?"context-bound, context-free, and con...
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In our review of the literature concerning sustainable architecture, we find a remarkably diverse constellation of ideas that defy simple categorization. But rather than lament the apparent inability to standardize a singular approach to degraded environmental and social conditions, we celebrate pluralism as a means to contest technological and sci...
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1. Introduction: The Paradoxes of Sustainable Architecture 2. Re-Interpreting Green Design: Beyond Performance and Ideology 3. Theory, Practice, and Proof: Learning from 'Buildings that Teach' 4. The Social Construction of 'Green Building' Codes: Competing Models by Industry, Government, and NGOs 5. The Politics of Design in Cities: Preconceptions,...
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The purpose of this article is to understand better the political content of the now ubiquitous term, sustainable development. Perhaps the most elegant definition of sustainable development yet devised is that by planner Scott Campbell. His definition is illustrated by a simple equilateral triangle in which the competing demands of the three Es - e...
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Full-text available
Proposals for regionalist architecture have appeared regularly in architectural discourse since the seventeenth century. Central to this discourse are shifting attitudes toward the core concepts of technology and place. Moderns, it seems, tend to value technology and devalue place. Postmoderns do the opposite - they value place and devalue technolo...
Article
Public concern for the environmental sustainability of development has required that architects understand technology in other than instrumental terms. Architecture, however, lacks a vocabulary that enables practitioners to adequately understand the social construction of technological systems. The case of Blueprint Demonstration Farm in Laredo, Te...
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Includes bibliographical references (leaves 238-247). Vita. Thesis (Ph. D.)--Texas A & M University, 1996. Microfilm. s
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The difficulty of projecting ecological impacts, as well as the increasing familiarity of planners with Geographical Information Systems and other software technology has led to an increase in the use of Planning Support Systems (PSS) by city and regional planners. Due to their newness and rapid development, there is, of yet, a lack of a comprehens...
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This study explores the social, technological economic, and environmental development of single-family residential water conservation programs at the Austin Water Utility and asks: What makes a conservation program successful? I hypothesize that water conservation programs will be successful if both institutional-producer goals and citizen-consumer...
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The purpose of this thesis is to determine if Building Information Modeling (BIM) is an effective means for encouraging stakeholder collaboration throughout the building design/construction process and improving upon affordable and sustainable strategies for infill housing development. The research methodology includes literature reviews, interview...
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Building codes are socio-technical regulations that govern the manner in which the built world is designed, constructed, and maintained. Instituted in order to protect the health, safety, and welfare of humans in the built world, codes also serve as an index of always changing societal values. If codes do not co-evolve with social values, however,...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Situated Data is a postdoctoral study that breaks out of the Latin American Housing Network at The University of Texas at Austin (https://www.lahn.utexas.org/) and has three parts: (1) the development of a participatory methodology for evaluating incremental and non-incremental housing types in upgraded informal settlements; (2) the implementation of the methodology across two of São Paulo’s largest informal settlements (n = 1,032); (3) the development of a data visualization tool called ComuniDADOS. The primary objective is to measure the sociotechnical variations across incremental housing environments, and produce data that can help communities prioritize development decision-making. Subtopics that emerged through the study include the participatory assessment of slum upgrading, the merger of remote geospatial and field-based methods, tracing the evolution of incremental housing stock, and the use of digital tools for translating data into outcomes that improve conditions in informal settlements. Supported by a National Science Foundation grant (#1513395), a large scale household survey was undertaken between 2015 and 2017 across two comparative cases in São Paulo, in collaboration with community partners, and has the following results: Documentation and digital simulation of how 932 incremental houses have evolved over three decades. Documentation of 100 formal social housing units. Construction of an expanding graphic, photographic, and numerical database. Transcription of respondents’ life trajectories, with particular focus on involvement in incremental housing evolution. Tracing of material resource streams that shape incremental housing and its broader informal environments Interviews with 100 Minha Casa Minha Vida social housing inscribers Collaborative production of a project film, with community partners (presented at UNHabitat III in 2016) Documentation of physical conversion strategies, spaces, and resource streams Creation of a participatory sociotechnical methodology Construction of a GIS-based data visualization tool (awarded a National 2018 American Planning Association Smart Cities Technology Division award) Identification of planning and policy issues that require further research Generation of four sub-studies in case communities and comparative Latin American contexts
Project
As a member of The Algae Collective I am engaged in an action research project that connects the sustainability of seaweed (Ascophylum) harvesting in the inter-tidal zone of the Gulf of Maine to the economic development of coastal communities. The Algae Collaborative is an interdisciplinary action-research team comprised of a marine biologist (who studies seaweeds), two visual artists (whose expertise span sculpture and new media), and an architect/planner (who studies the social science of sustainability).