Steven Kaplan

Steven Kaplan
Hebrew University of Jerusalem | HUJI · Department of Comparative Religion

About

53
Publications
3,669
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444
Citations
Citations since 2016
1 Research Item
189 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
Introduction

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
The Oromo and the Christian kingdom of Ethiopia, 1300–1700. By Mohammed Hassen . (Eastern Africa Series.) Pp. xx + 380 incl. 14 maps. Woodbridge–Rochester, NY: Boydell Press, 2015. £45. 978 1 84701 117 6 - Volume 68 Issue 1 - Steven Kaplan
Article
Dawit I has received far less attention than either his grandfather ʿAmdä Ṣǝyon I or his son Zärʾa Yaʿǝqob. This comparatively brief article attempts to partially redress the balance. During the more than three decades during which he reigned, Dawit strengthened the religious and political fabric of Ethiopia. By promoting devotion to both the Cros...
Article
:In the last decade of the twentieth century, Yellow Pages, the well-known business directories that effectively advertise services in fairly standardized formats, have been published by entrepreneurs for various ethnic communities, including Ethiopians. This essay reads the Ethiopian Yellow Pages (EYP), published for the Washington, DC, area, as a...
Article
The purpose of this article is to present a preliminary overview of the two largest Ethiopian immigrant communities: the United States and Israel. While Ethiopians in Israel have been the subject of a vast literature, Ethiopians in the United States have received far less attention. This paper seeks to initiate a comparative discussion by discussin...
Article
Full-text available
This article looks at how working-class Ethiopian women, who have migrated to Israel, have sought empowerment and economic control through the establishment of rotating credit associations known as iqqub. In the changing world of Ethiopian Israeli women, iqqub associations and their specific cultural manifestations constitute a highly meaningful ex...
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The purpose of this article is to survey the history of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church with an emphasis on several features which are of significance for comparison to Syriac Orthodox Christianity. Although it focuses primarily on the period from 1270 during which 'Ethiopian' was a national rather than ethnic identity, it shares several themes with...
Article
In this study of the Ethiopian Orthodox Mäsqäl festival, we have chosen to focus upon the multiple ways in which diverse and even contradictory social messages have been dramatized through this celebration throughout its more than five hundred years of recorded history. While portrayals of imperial power are perhaps the most obvious features of the...
Article
The migration of the vast majority of Beta Israel (Falasha) to Israel has been accompanied by major shifts in the discourse regarding their ‘Jewishness' and ‘Ethiopian-ness'. This article discusses the adoption of traditions of Danite descent in place of traditions of Solomonic descent and the emergence of genetics as the most important identity ma...
Article
Kaplan points out that although the Ethiopian-Israeli community is by far the most discussed of all Ethiopian expatriate groups, relatively little has been written about Ethiopian Israelis that places them in the larger context of the Ethiopian diaspora, or even treats them as a diaspora community. Ethiopian Israelis are unusual in that their prese...
Article
Although conversion is one of the major themes in the religious and cultural history of Ethiopia, it has yet to benefit from extensive and systematic comparative discussion. For generations, scholars have worked to deepen our understanding of conversion to both Orthodox Christianity and Islam in the Ethiopian highlands. Recent works, moreover, are...
Article
The prevailing image of Zär'a Ya'eqob has tended to emphasize the intellectual at the expense of the experiential and political power at the expense of religious power. It is to these relatively neglected aspects of religious life that this article is devoted. It is our purpose here to emphasize the importance of the Cross, the image of the Virgin,...
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This article explores aspects of racial discourse employed in discussing Ethiopian Jews in Israel. It assumes that racial classifications are social constructions which themselves must be analysed and explained. Although Ethiopian immigrants did not consider themselves to be ‘black’ in Ethiopia, they are usually described as such in Israel. This se...
Article
The Hyena People: Ethiopian Jews in Christian Ethiopia by HAGAR SALAMON Berkeley, CA: The University of California Press, 1999, Pp. 168. US$48.00, US$17.95 (pbk.). - - Volume 39 Issue 2 - STEVEN KAPLAN
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Immigrants & Bureaucrats: Ethiopians in an Israeli absorption center by ESTHER HERTZOG New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 1999. Pp. 204. $45.00/£30.00. - - Volume 38 Issue 4 - STEVEN KAPLAN
Article
The arrival of over 55,000 Ethiopian immigrants in Israel has produced a situation whose social implications extend beyond the borders of a single state. The arrival of a black African group in a predominantly white country with virtually no previous experience with such a population is unusual, if not unique, in the second half of the twentieth ce...
Article
For over five hundred years, since the great age of exploration, Western Christians have visited, traded with, conquered and colonized large parts of the non-Western world. In virtually every case this contact has been accompanied by an attempt to spread Christianity. This volume explores the manner in which Western missionary Christianity has been...
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This book provides an excellent handbook to the Islamic movements in Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, and Libya and fills a major gap in the scholarship on Islam and the Arab West. © Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 1994, 1996. All rights reserved.
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Abstract This paper examines the statuettes produced both in Ethiopia and in Israel by the Beta Israel (Falasha). Previous studies of these statuettes have focussed around the issues of antiquity and authenticity. Those who have erroneously accepted the antiquity of the statuettes have ignored the issue of relations between the Falasha and external...
Article
Full-text available
S. Kaplan — Trois approches de l'« invention » des Juifs ethiopiens. Dans la premiere partie de cet article, on distingue trois approches de l'identite des Beta Israel (Falasha). L'auteur procede tout d'abord a une synthese des analyses historiques et anthropologiques recentes concernant les Beta Israel, analyses qui ont ete fortement influencees p...
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This article considers recent research on the religion of the Beta Israel (Falasha), and in particular Kay Kaufman Shelemay's "Music, Ritual," and "Falasha History." Most scholars have, on the basis of an artificially static and ahistorical picture of the Beta Israel religion, depicted it as a form of ancient Judaism. In contrast, Shelemay contends...
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Of the many issues confronting African Christians today, none would appear to have received more attention than the problem of defining the precise relationship between Christianity and African culture. The lively, sometimes heated, debate which has developed over this issue has produced in its wake a substantial body of literature on diverse aspec...
Article
One obstacle which confronts any historian interested in reconstructing the history of the B Esra'lasha) of Ethiopia is the comparative scarcity of reliable historical sources. References to the B Esra'dlat are all too rare, while those in Hebrew generally lack historical value. The scattered mentions of the Fälasha in other languages prior to the...
Article
The hagiographic literature of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church may be divided into two major categories: the translated lives of the saints and martyrs of the early Christian church and the lives of local saints. The essentially foreign works, which constitute the first of these groups, will be of only peripheral concern in this paper. While books su...
Article
This essay offers a general introduction to the volume's papers, providing the necessary background information about their genesis and relationship to other relevant publications within Ethiopian, African, and diaspora studies. The concept of diaspora and its relevance for the Ethiopian experience is discussed, providing a historical overview of E...

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