Steven E. Jasinski

Steven E. Jasinski
Harrisburg University of Science and Technology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

57
Publications
40,210
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362
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2010 - May 2013
East Tennessee State University
Position
  • Graduate Assistant

Publications

Publications (57)
Article
Plastomeninae, a clade of fossil turtles that has recently undergone significant revision, are currently known from the Late Cretaceous to the Eocene, with some genera known to survive the end-Cretaceous mass extinction (e.g., Hutchemys). Only one taxon survives past the Paleocene into the Eocene (Plastomenus thomasii). Despite the majority of Hutc...
Article
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A nearly complete skull of a new ceratopsid dinosaur, Bisticeratops froeseorum, is described from the Farmington Member of the Kirtland Formation (late Campanian, Upper Cretaceous) of New Mexico. Bisticeratops is distinguished by several diagnostic cranial characters, including those of the premaxilla (stepped dorsal margin), maxilla (short jugal p...
Article
The horned dinosaurs (Ceratopsidae) were a diverse family of herbivorous dinosaurs originating in the Late Cretaceous in western North America (Laramidia). As one of the most species-rich dinosaur groups, their diversity and distribution are important to understanding Cretaceous dinosaur evolution. Ceratopsids have previously been hypothesized to h...
Article
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An associated incomplete skeleton of a ceratopsid dinosaur from the Campanian deposits of the Allison Member of the Menefee Formation in New Mexico, USA is described. Although it was originally described over two decades ago, newly prepared portions of the Menefee Formation skeleton and reinterpretations of previously known morphology, in addition...
Article
Metoposaurids are a widespread and ubiquitous constituent of Late Triassic non-marine paleoenvironments. In North America, this group is practically the only large-bodied temnospondyl clade, and is particularly well documented from the American southwest and south-central regions (Arizona, New Mexico, Texas). However, metoposaurids are poorly docum...
Article
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Newly described specimens of North American Eocene turtles provide valuable information on their morphology and, more specifically, variation, both intraspecific and ontogenetic. We describe several complete and nearly complete testudinoid (Testudinoidea) specimens, including juvenile specimens of Hadrianus corsoni, H. majusculus, Echmatemys hayden...
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Dromaeosaurids (Theropoda: Dromaeosauridae), a group of dynamic, swift predators, have a sparse fossil record, particularly at the time of their extinction near the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. Here we report on a new dromaeosaurid, Dineobellator notohesperus, gen. and sp. nov., consisting of a partial skeleton from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastric...
Article
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We studied for the first time the molecular differentiation of all three currently recognized subspecies of Trachemys scripta, including the morphologically distinct western populations of T. s. elegans ('western red-eared sliders'), using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences (up to 3,236 bp and 2,738 bp, respectively) and 14 microsatellite loci...
Conference Paper
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We describe new material, including juvenile specimens, of Hadrianus corsoni, Hadrianus majusculus, Echmatemys haydeni, and Echmatemys naomi. Testudinidae evolved in North America from one of the geoemydid-like forms in the genus Echmatemys, which have their lowest stratigraphic occurrence in the earliest Wasatchian North American land mammal “age”...
Article
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Two isolated lower jaws belonging to different baenid turtles are identified as cf. Boremys grandis from the upper Campanian (Late Cretaceous) Kirtland Formation (De-na-zin Member) and cf. Neurankylus torrejonensis from the Paleocene Nacimiento Formation (Puercan). Cf. Boremys grandis is the first lower jaw of a baenid to be documented from the Lat...
Article
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Trachemys (Testudines: Emydidae) represents one of the most well-known turtle genera today. The evolution of Trachemys , while being heavily documented with fossil representatives, is not well understood. Numerous fossils from the late Hemphillian Gray Fossil Site (GFS) in northeastern Tennessee help to elucidate its evolution. The fossil Trachemys...
Data
Appendix 4: Trachemys haugrudi osteology atlas.
Data
Trachemys haugrudi osteology atlas: Supplemental Figures S1–S72. Trachemys haugrudi is represented by multiple individuals with many that are nearly complete. This appendix shows representative specimens and includes all known elements of T. haugrudi from different individuals and across the entire skeleton and represent the holotype, paratypes, an...
Data
Appendix 1: Specimens examined.
Data
Appendix 5: Figure Captions for 50% majority rule consensus trees from phylogenetic analysis.
Data
Appendix 2: Character list.
Data
Appendix 6: Geologic and temporal data for fossil taxa used in the phylogenetic analysis in the present study.
Data
Appendix 3: Character–taxon data matrix.
Data
Supplemental Figures S73–S74–50% majority rule phylogenetic trees.
Article
Morphology, or shapes, particularly of bones, is important for understanding how animals vary and, therefore, for understanding diversity. Comparison of morphology in animals can be used to make inferences on fossil organisms. At its base, fossil specimens are described and compared with other fossil and modern specimens, often to determine if they...
Article
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This study provides a detailed osteological description of an isolated proximal caudal centrum and two nearly complete isolated metatarsals II and IV of the left foot of a gracile theropod dinosaur from the Lower Campanian of the Merchantville Formation in northern Delaware, USA. The caudal centrum and the metatarsals are referred to Tyrannosauroid...
Article
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The Gray Fossil Site (GFS) of northeastern Tennessee is a late Hemphillian fossil locality in the southern Appalachian mountain region of eastern North America with a diverse vertebrate fauna. Snakes make up a substantial microfossil portion of the GFS herpetofauna, particularly the Colubridae, comprised of members of the Colubrinae and Natricinae....
Article
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In light of a recent paper, we review, and reassess, the validity of the pachycephalosaurid dinosaur Stegoceras novomexicanum (Dinosauria: Ornithischia: Pachycephalosauridae). Specimens that are referred to Stegoceras novomexicanum are all late Campanian (early Kirtlandian) in age and are not only from a restricted stratigraphic horizon at the Frui...
Article
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North-south provinciality among Campanian and/or Maastrichtian vertebrates, especially dinosaurs, in the Western Interior basin of North America (specifically, between West Texas and southern Alberta, Canada) has been accepted by many vertebrate paleontologists for about 30 years. However, a critical review indicates that the case for provinciality...
Article
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The late Pleistocene of northern Mexico is relatively poorly understood, and represented by only a few fossil localities. One such locality is Térapa, located in east-central Sonora. The deposit dates to between 43,000 and 40,000 years old (Rancholabrean) and yields a rich fossil fauna of over 60 identified taxa, dominated by birds and large mammal...
Article
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A tooth recovered from the middle Miocene Choptank Formation (Chesapeake Group) of Maryland is identified as a new cynarctin borophagine (Canidae: Borophaginae: Cynarctina), here called Cynarctus wangi n. sp. The tooth, identified as a right upper second molar, represents the first carnivoran material reported from the Choptank Formation and part o...
Article
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Three nearly complete, isolated vertebrae, and a right humerus of a sub-adult hadrosaurine (Ornithopoda: Hadrosaurinae), all from separate individuals and from the Late Cretaceous (late Campanian) Hunter Wash local fauna (Fruitland Formation [Fossil Forest Member] and Kirtland Formation [Hunter Wash Member]), San Juan Basin, New Mexico, bear distin...
Article
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Abstract—Recent field work and research call for a new look at the carnivorans from the middle Miocene of New Mexico. Here changes in carnivoran guilds through time within the Tesuque Formation as well as the carnivoran diversity in each member are described. The Tesuque Formation in New Mexico contains fossiliferous layers of strata that span the...
Article
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Abstract— A left frontal from the Upper Cretaceous Kirtland Formation (De-na-zin Member), San Juan Basin, New Mexico, is diagnosed as Saurornitholestes sullivani n. sp., a new species of dromaeosaurid (Theropoda: Dromaeosauridae). The frontal is similar to Saurornitholestes langstoni in being triangular in shape, not basined between the median sutu...
Article
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This article discusses the use of artificial shelter, in this sense human refuse. This is an important occurrence for the endangered large cryptobranchid amphibian Cryptobranchus alleganiensis alleganiensis (Eastern hellbender), and may have implications for its conservation, along with other endangered amphibians and other animals.
Article
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The extinct taxon Dasypus bellus has long been considered identical to the extant Dasypus novemcinctus osteologically when disregarding allometric differences. In this study, we undertake a preliminary investigation into this extinct taxon and an extant relative D. novemcinctus, by comparing the calcanea of these two dasypodids. Clear osteological...
Article
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Trionychid turtles are currently found throughout much of eastern North America, but their fossil record within this region has not been thoroughly documented. This study reviews previously reported trionychid fossils from Cretaceous to Pleistocene strata of Alabama and makes new additions to that list. The fossils described herein include the firs...
Chapter
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The fossil turtles from the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland and Kirtland formations (late Campanian; Kirtlandian) have been known for more than 100 years. We re-assess and revise these Late Cretaceous testudine taxa from the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, USA, and discuss their biostratigraphic distribution. We recognize the following valid taxa as present...
Article
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Abstract—Coprolites from the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland, Kirtland and Ojo Alamo formations in the vertebrate paleontology collection of the State Museum of Pennsylvania consist of different forms that are identified as morphotypes A-G. These coprolites are attributed to carnivorous vertebrates (fishes, turtles and crocodylians). At least four uniqu...
Article
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A nearly complete robust left humerus (SMP VP-2263) and right jugal (SMP VP-1534) belonging to a lambeosaurin lambeosaurine (= Lambeosaurus + (Corythosaurus + Hypacrosaurus)) dinosaur have been recov-ered from two separate localities in the Naashoibito Member (Ojo Alamo Formation), San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Measurements of the humerus are: length...
Article
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The most complete skull of the amiid fish Melvius was recently recovered from the Upper Cretaceous (upper Campanian) lower Kirtland Formation (Hunter Wash Member) in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The specimen (SMP VP-1485) is identified as M. chauliodous based on its large size, and the fact that it comes from the type area and type stratum of Me...
Article
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Coelophysis bauri is a small theropod dinosaur from the Late Triassic of the southwestern United States. The Whitaker (= Ghost Ranch) quarry, which preserves hundreds to perhaps thousands of individuals, has led to many hypotheses about its behavior and feeding strategies. The beam theory allows for a quantitative approach to reconstruction of the...
Article
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Several sandstone casts of dinosaur footprints, identified as the ichnogenus Caririchnium, have been recovered from the lower part of the Fossil Forest Member, Fruitland Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The footprints, which were made by a large hadrosaur, are tridactyl, have broad, rounded heel imprints, and thick toes that terminate in shor...
Article
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Two partial pachycephalosaurid skulls, from the upper Fruitland and lower Kirtland formations (Upper Cretaceous), are recognized as belonging to a new species of Stegoceras Lambe, S. novomexicanum, n. sp. Stegoceras novomexicanum differs from the only other recognized species of Stegoceras (sensu Sullivan, 2003) in possessing: a reduced and sub-rec...
Article
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A small left humerus of a lambeosaurine (Hadrosauridae), measuring 41 mm in length, is identified as a hatchling individual that probably belongs to the taxon Parasaurolophus tubicen. The specimen was discovered in the Kirtland Formation (De-na-zin Member), in the same stratigraphic horizon, and close to the locality, where the skull of Parasaurolo...
Article
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An unusual paleopathology, in the form of an irregular-shaped bony plate that is fused to, and is part of, the fused neural spine complex, is the first of its kind to be described for a ceratopsid dinosaur. This pathology is a bony mass composed of a network of fused ossified tendons and secondary bone deposited in a rather thin plate that extends...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Fruitland Formation in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico yields many dinosaur skeletal remains, but few dinosaur footprints. This makes the recent discovery of numerous footprints as sandstone casts near the contact of the Ne-nah-ne-zad and Fossil Forest members of the Fruitland Formation on Split Lip Fl...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Two partial pachycephalosaurid skulls, from the upper Fruitland and lower Kirtland formations (Upper Cretaceous), are recognized as belonging to a new species of Stegoceras. This new pachycephalosaurid differs from the only other recognized species of Stegoceras (sensu stricto) in possessing: a reduced and sub-rectangular posteromedial extension of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The fossil turtles from the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland and Kirtland formations (late Campanian; Kirtlandian), San Juan Basin, New Mexico, USA, have been known for more than 100 years. We re-assess and revise the testudine taxa and recognize 15 valid taxa, including: the bothremydid Chedighaii hutchinsoni; the pleurosternid Compsemys sp.; the baenod...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Claims of Paleocene dinosaur fossils in the San Juan Basin have been largely based on palynostratigraphy-namely, that in situ Paleocene-age palynomorphs are found stratigraphically below in situ dinosaur fossils. One key locality is Barrel Springs in the west-central San Juan Basin (sec. 17T24N RllW), where a carbonaceous shale bed at the top of th...
Conference Paper
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The boundaries of land-vertebrate faunachrons (lvfs) are defined on the first appearances of key index taxa that form the basis of a global Triassic tetrapod biochronology: FAD Lystrosaurus – Lootsbergian (Induan); FAD Cynognathus – Nonesian (Olenekian); FAD Eocyclotosaurus – Perovkan (Anisian-Ladinian); FAD Mastodonsaurus – Berdyankian (Ladinian-C...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
For over a century, Late Cretaceous fossil vertebrates have been intermittently collected from the lower part of the Ojo Alamo Formation (Naashoibito Member = Ojo Alamo beds [in part] of earlier workers). The first attempt to characterize the vertebrate fauna from the Naashoibito Member was by Lehman, who dubbed the fauna the “Alamo Wash local faun...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Whitaker quarry at Ghost Ranch, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, USA, is one of the most extensive Late Triassic bonebeds known, yielding hundreds of skeletons of the theropod dinosaur Coelophysis bauri. The quarry also yields the following tetrapod taxa: the sphenodont Whitakersaurus, at least two drepanosaurid taxa, the sphenosuchian Hesperosuc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A nearly complete robust left humerus (SMP VP-2263) and right jugal (SMP VP-1534) belonging to a “lambeosaurin” lambeosaurine (=Lambeosaurus + (Corythosaurus + Hypacrosaurus)) dinosaur have been recovered from the Naashoibito Member (Ojo Alamo Formation), San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Measurements of the humerus are: length-550 mm; deltopectoral cres...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Sea turtles, specifically members of the family Protostegidae, reached gigantic size (up to 4 m long) during the Late Cretaceous and have been documented extensively from the deposits of the Western Interior Seaway in the mid-continent of North America (e.g., Wieland, 1902, 1903, 1906; Williston, 1914; Zangerl, 1953; Hirayama, 1997; Lehman and Toml...
Article
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In a recent article in this journal, Fassett (2009) concludes that dinosaur fossils of Paleocene age are present in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico-Colorado. However, we argue that, based on existing data, Fassett has failed to produce compelling evi-dence to support this conclusion. In the San Juan Basin, only one arguably reworked dinosaur bone...

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