Steven Foster

Steven Foster
Coventry University | CU

PhD in Genetics

About

9
Publications
1,316
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548
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Introduction
Steven Foster currently works as a Senior Lecturer at Coventry University (Faculty of Health and Life Sciences), and is an Honorary Lecturer at the University of Leicester (Department of Genetics and Genome Biology). Steven's research program is focussed on uncovering the genetic and molecular mechanisms of cellular stress responses and determining their significance in disease and treatment responses. Ultimately, the goal is to identify potential new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Currently, he studies 3 stressors: (1) DNA damage - determining mechanisms of genome maintenance and cancer suppression. (2) Cancer therapy - identifying regulators of chemo- and radio-resistance. (3) Fasting/caloric restriction - how glucose intake affects cell health and cancer treatment tolerance.

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Full-text available
Background: Targeted therapies are based on exploiting cancer-cell-specific genetic features or phenotypic traits to selectively kill cancer cells while leaving normal cells unaffected. Oxidative stress is a cancer hallmark phenotype. Given that free nucleotide pools are particularly vulnerable to oxidation, the nucleotide pool sanitising enzyme,...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Microbial arrays, with a large number of different strains on a single plate printed with robotic precision, underpin an increasing number of genetic and genomic approaches. These include Synthetic Genetic Array analysis, high-throughput Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) analysis and 2-hybrid techniques. Measuring the growth of individual...
Preprint
Background Targeted therapies are based on exploiting cancer-cell-specific genetic features or phenotypic traits to selectively kill cancer cells while leaving normal cells unaffected. Oxidative stress is a cancer hallmark phenotype. Given that free nucleotide pools are particularly vulnerable to oxidation, the nucleotide pool sanitising enzyme, MT...
Article
Full-text available
The DNA damage response comprises DNA repair, cell-cycle checkpoint control, and DNA damage-induced apoptosis that collectively promote genomic integrity and suppress tumorigenesis. Previously, we have shown that the Chk2 kinase functions independently of the Mre11 complex (Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1) and ATM in apoptosis and suppresses tumorigenesis r...
Article
Full-text available
The Mre11 complex is a central component of the DNA damage response, with roles in damage sensing, molecular bridging, and end resection. We have previously shown that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ku70 (yKu70) deficiency reduces the ionizing radiation sensitivity of mre11Δ mutants. In this study, we show that yKu70 deficiency suppressed the camptot...
Article
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Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) developed as anti-cancer agents have a high degree of selectivity for killing cancer cells. HDACi induce acetylation of histones and nonhistone proteins, which affect gene expression, cell cycle progression, cell migration, and cell death. The mechanism of the tumor selective action of HDACi is unclear. Here,...
Article
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Oligomeric assembly of Brca1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain-containing mediator proteins occurs at sites of DNA damage. However, the functional significance and regulation of such assemblies are not well understood. In this study, we defined the molecular mechanism of DNA-damage-induced oligomerization of the S. cerevisiae BRCT protein Rad9. Our data sug...
Article
Full-text available
MRX, an evolutionally conserved DNA damage response complex composed of Mre11, Rad50 and Xrs2, is involved in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, checkpoint activation and telomere maintenance. At DSBs, MRX plays a role in generating single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and signalling cell cycle arrest. Here we investigated whether MRX also contributes to...
Article
Full-text available
Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is an important intermediate in many DNA repair pathways. Here we describe protocols that permit the measurement of ssDNA that has arisen in the yeast genome in vivo, in response to telomere uncapping. Yeast strains defective in DNA damage response (DDR) genes can be used to infer the roles of the corresponding proteins...

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