Steven J. R. Allain

Steven J. R. Allain
University of Kent | KENT · Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology

BSc (Hons), MRes

About

79
Publications
25,759
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
80
Citations
Introduction
My passion lies in discipline of herpetology, the study of reptiles and amphibians. In particular this concerns native British amphibians and reptiles. I am a member of the following: - Zoological Society of London (ZSL) - British Herpetological Society (BHS) - Linnean Society of London - International Varanid Interest Group (IVIG) - Cambridge & Peterborough Amphibian and Reptile Group (CPARG) - Amphibian Specialist Group (ASG) Twitter: @stevoallain
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - November 2016
National University of Singapore
Position
  • Research Assistant
September 2014 - July 2015
Anglia Ruskin University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
October 2018 - September 2022
University of Kent
Field of study
  • Biodiversity Management
September 2017 - September 2018
Imperial College London
Field of study
  • Ecology, Evolution and Conservation
September 2012 - July 2015
Anglia Ruskin University
Field of study
  • Zoology

Publications

Publications (79)
Article
Full-text available
The herpetology collection of the Ewha Womans University Natural History Museum (EWNHM) represents one of the oldest and largest institutional collections in the Republic of Korea. The specimens deposited in the EWNHM represent a major historical collection of the native herpetofauna, both in species diversity and time span. However, the full inven...
Article
Full-text available
Pseudoacanthocephalus goodmani n. sp. is described from faecal pellets collected from Sclerophrys gutturalis (Power, 1927), the guttural toad. The species is characterized by a suite of characters, including a proboscis armature of 14–18 longitudinal rows of 4–6 hooks with simple roots, lemnisci longer than the proboscis receptacle, equatorial test...
Article
Full-text available
In the past decade, infectious disease threats to European herpetofauna have become better understood. Since the 1990s, three major emerging infections in amphibians have been identified (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, B. salamandrivorans, and ranaviruses) as well as at least one of unknown status (herpesviruses), while two major emerging infectio...
Article
Full-text available
It is important to map invasive species in order to demonstrate their rate of spread and current distribution. Most recording schemes rely on opportunistic sightings and awareness to collect and gather data. Mining data from online social media and other data sharing platforms has become more prevalent in recent years as increasing numbers of users...
Article
Full-text available
Ranavirus is the second most common infectious cause of amphibian mortality. These viruses affect caudates, an order in which information regarding Ranavirus pathogenesis is scarce. In the Netherlands, two strains (CMTV-NL I and III) were suspected to possess distinct pathogenicity based on field data. To investigate susceptibility and disease prog...
Article
Ophidiomyces ophidiicola is an emerging fungal pathogen associated with infections in snakes across North America. Although documented in Pennsylvania, O. ophidiicola has not been found at the Powdermill Nature Reserve (PNR) in southwestern Pennsylvania, where the snake assemblage has been studied since 2002 and several species have recently declin...
Article
Full-text available
The alpine newt (Ichthyosaura alpestris) is an alien species in Great Britain. Using location information derived from photographs posted on social media we have updated its known distribution, validated previously unconfirmed populations, and present an updated distribution map. Comparison of the records collected from social media with those in t...
Article
Full-text available
Review and synthesis of the known, published dietary records for all snakes in the Eunectes genus.
Article
Full-text available
Short note on range expansion and lowest elevation record for Hyloscirtus mashpi.
Article
Full-text available
This is a short note on the first evidence of fish-scavenging behavior in the Yellow-Footed Tortoise (Chelonoidis denticulatus).
Article
Full-text available
Every 3-4 years, herpetologists from around the world meet at the World Congress of Herpetology. The 1st World Congress was held in England (Canterbury) in 1989 when mysterious amphibian declines were discussed; this was a full decade before one of the main causative agents Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis was identified. The World Congress series ha...
Article
Full-text available
In the past decade, infectious disease threats to European herpetofauna have become better understood. Since the 1990s, three major emerging infections in amphibians have been identified (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, B. salamandrivorans, and ranaviruses) as well as at least one of unknown status (herpesviruses), while two major emerging infectio...
Article
Full-text available
Camera trap images from the Snapshot Serengeti project from 2010 were used to investigate the behaviour of rock agamas (Agama mwanzae) on the kopjes of the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. The species was observed only from four locations in the south-west of Serengeti in September/October. The images were used to analyse the total numbers of bas...
Article
Full-text available
The amphibian chytrid fungi (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and B. salamandrivorans) threaten amphibian species globally, and the introduction of non-native species is an important pathway via which the pathogen has spread. Here we report the results of disease screening of an introduced population of common midwife toad (Alytes obstetricans) in Ca...
Article
Full-text available
We report on a lesser known midwife toad (Alytes obstetricans) population within central Cambridge, England, UK with an initial investigation of the population’s extent. In order to achieve this we used call playbacks to locate and count individual toads which responded with a return call.
Poster
Full-text available
A poster outlining our research up until January 2017 regarding our midwife toad project.
Article
Full-text available
There are many anthropogenic obstacles faced by amphibians in the urban environment. An example of one of these are roads between habitat features such as hibernation sites and breeding ponds; this leads to traffic mortalities. In urban settings, cycle paths may be as busy as roads and present similar dangers; we report this in the case of smooth n...
Research
Full-text available
The Cambridge Amphibian Survey 2013 was a pilot study that was a continuation of surveys carried out at the Cambridge City Crematorium near Bar Hill, for the local council. This report outlines our findings from the 2013 survey season.

Questions

Questions (17)
Question
Hi everyone,
One of my iButtons which has been deployed in the field has malfunctioned. When I try to read it, I get the error message that it cannot be read. I'm not to worried about the data if it is lost (which I assume it is). Due to this error I can't reset the iButton, which is a concern. Has anyone had a similar experience in the past, and if so, what can be done?
Thanks!
Question
With my current application of DS1921G-F5 thermochrons (measuring the temperature underneath artificial cover objects), there is a risk that they may be immersed in water for short periods of time due to localised flooding. I know they have a rubber grommet which seals them and they're advertised as 'water-resistant', but I'm not entirely sure what this means.
I was wondering if anyone had any experience with the tolerance of iButtons to these kind of conditions? If the site does unfortunately flood, will I need to retrieve my iButtons and redeploy them once the flood waters have receded? Thanks in advance.
Question
I'm aware that the Mwanza rock agama (Agama mwanzae) can be found in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania but I was also wondering if it occupied this area with any other sympatric species.
Question
I've recently used the calls of male midwife toads played back to a restricted population of the toads in order to assess their overall population size. Has anything like this been done in the past within Europe either with midwife toads or another anuran species?
Question
I'm currently researching the common midwife toad (Alytes obstetricans) and there are a few aspects of it's life history I can't find information for in the search I have so far carried out in the literature. A few websites (which aren't referenced) have stated that the toads can live up to eight years in the wild but an average lifespan is about 5 years. Other web sources also state that sexual maturity takes about 2-3 years. Can anyone please point me to any sources from peer-reviewed articles that either backup or refute these claims?
Question
I am currently trying to assess the population size of a non-native species here in England, the midwife toad (Alytes obstetricans). So far I have only found what I think are males (as they call) but I have noticed a difference in the kind of calls that are made by the toads.When I have looked at the calls using sonogram analysis software two different calls are distinguished. I was wondering if one could be from a male and the other from a female.
I have attached a sonogram which shows a short section of one of my recordings. Am I right in thinking that individual A is a male and individual B is a female returning his call?
Question
I shall soon be traveling to Malaysian Borneo, I intend to try to find as many amphibian and reptile species as I can whilst I'm out there. I was wondering if anyone was aware of a published checklist of all of Sandakan's reptile and amphibians.
Question
I have noticed that at a number of sites toad (Bufo bufo) tadpoles have not developed as much as frog (Rana temporaria) tadpoles despite the spawn of both species being laid around the same time. Is there environmental factors that could explain this or is it more down to the species' biology?
Question
I have been wondering what genetically causes frogs to lack melanin as well of the roles of chromatophores in their colouration. Its the role of chromatophores and other pigment cells which I am unsure of. What are the specific roles of xanthophores and erythrophores in amphibian colouration?
Question
Hey everyone, I was wondering if much research has been done on the affect of lunar cycle on the activity of amphibians. I am aware of Deeming's 2008 paper where capture of newts correlated with the lunar cycle. I am interested to know if any other such correlations have been found in species around the world.

Network

Cited By