Steve Vissault

Steve Vissault

M.Sc. biology / ecology
Data scientist at Omnimed

About

19
Publications
7,005
Reads
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396
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - December 2018
Université de Sherbrooke
Position
  • Professor
September 2013 - May 2016
Université du Québec à Rimouski UQAR
Position
  • M.Sc candidate

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Ecological networks are increasingly studied at large spatial scales, expanding their focus from a conceptual tool for community ecology into one that also addresses questions in biogeography and macroecology. This effort is supported by increased access to standardized information on ecological networks, in the form of openly accessible databases....
Article
Full-text available
Aim Tree species may be vulnerable to migration lags because they are sessile, long‐lived, have a small intrinsic growth rate and relatively short dispersal. Our study assesses if those ecological mechanisms will mitigate the progression of the north‐eastern American temperate forest leading edge into the boreal forest. Location The North‐eastern...
Article
Full-text available
The St. Lawrence is a vast and complex socio-ecological system providing a wealth of services that sustain numerous economic sectors. This ecosystem is subject to significant human pressures that overlap and potentially interact with climate-driven environmental changes. Our objective in this paper was to systematically characterize the distributio...
Article
Several temperate tree species are expected to migrate northward and colonise boreal forests in response to climate change. Tree migrations could lead to transitions in forest types, but these could be influenced by several non‐climatic factors, such as disturbances and soil conditions. We analysed over 10,000 forest inventory plots, sampled from 1...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ecological networks are increasingly studied at large spatial scales, expanding their focus from a conceptual tool for community ecology into one that also adresses questions in biogeography and macroecology. This effort is supported by increased access to standardized information on ecological networks, in the form of openly accessible databases....
Article
Full-text available
Interactions among species is at the heart of ecology. Despite their importance, studying ecological interactions remains difficult due to the lack of standard information and the disparity of formats in which ecological interactions are stored (Poisot et al. 2015). Historically, ecologists have used matrices to store interactions, which tend to ea...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies of individual sites have revealed biotic changes consistent with climate warming (e.g., upward elevational distribution shifts), but our understanding of the tremendous variation among studies in the magnitude of such biotic changes is minimal. In this study we re‐surveyed forest vegetation plots 40 years after the initial surveys in t...
Poster
Full-text available
A regional assessment of cumulative impacts is required for the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence to facilitate ecosystem based management supported by evidence. The only currently available assessment was performed at the global scale using 19 drivers of anthropogenic stressors such as fisheries and pollution. While valuable, certain datasets inclu...
Presentation
Full-text available
Describing environmental and anthropogenic drivers of ecosystem change (e.g. hypoxia and fisheries) is largely relying on simplistic metrics that ignore dependencies and the potentially convoluted propagation of effects through complex ecological networks. While informative, such approaches are hardly conducive to robust inference on the impacts of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Many studies of individual sites have revealed biotic changes consistent with climate warming (e.g., upward elevational distribution shifts), but our understanding of the tremendous variation among studies in the magnitude of such biotic changes is minimal. In this study we re-surveyed forest vegetation plots 40 years after the initial surveys in t...
Article
Full-text available
Scientists, policy makers, and journalists are three key, interconnected players involved in prioritizing and implementing solutions to mitigate the consequences of anthropogenic pressures on the environment. The way in which information is framed and expertise is communicated by the media is crucial for political decisions and for the integrated m...
Poster
Full-text available
Gathering data for large scale, systematic research initiatives such as regional multi-stressor analyses can be a very challenging - not to say painful - process. On one hand, there is an overwhelming wealth of data available, while on the other hand, some required data remain largely unavailable or inaccessible. Coupled with political intricacies,...
Article
Full-text available
Marine ecological indicators can be used to assess the condition of the pelagic ecosystems. The bloom onset provides a warning bell for possible changes in trophic interactions and biogeochemical processes. However, depicting the phenology of phytoplankton blooms at high latitudes, where long-term observations are sparse or unavailable, is not a st...
Article
Full-text available
Global climate change is already having an impact on species ranges. For species with slow demography and limited dispersal, such as trees, lags between climate change and distribution shifts are likely to increase in the future. Such lags can be of critical importance to management and biodiversity of forests, because they can result in ‘extinctio...
Article
Communities consist of species and their interactions. They can thus be described as networks, with species as nodes and interactions as links. Within such networks, the diversity of nodes and the distribution of links may affect patterns of energy transfer between trophic levels, the dynamics of the system, and the outcome in terms of ecosystem fu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Since the mid-20th century, climate change and biodiversity loss have been identified as major consequences of anthropological pressures and both have already transgressed safe limits. Given their significance for human health and well-being and their large-scale effects, international cooperation is crucial to address these issues. Intergovernment...
Article
Full-text available
Interestingly, relationships between demographic parameters and occurrence probability did not vary substantially across degrees of shade tolerance and regions. Although they were influenced by the uncertainty in the estimation of the demographic parameters, we found that r was generally negatively correlated with P-occ, while N, and for most regio...
Poster
Full-text available
The North Water (NOW), located between Greenland and Ellesmere Island (Canadian Arctic), is one of the largest and most productive polynyas in the Northern Hemisphere. Recent sea ice and oceanic observations reveal that major changes are happening in the NOW. The impact of those changes on the marine productivity is still not well understood. A sat...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The intensification of the human footprint in marine ecosystems imposes the use of a systematic planning approach for the use of marine resources. There is, however, currently little knowledge on how multiple stressors interact to affect the integrity of ecosystem structure and functions. My PhD project focuses on evaluating cumulative anthropogenic impacts on the structure of the communities of the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence in eastern Canada. The specific goals of my thesis are to: 1. Evaluate cumulative impacts on the ecosystems of the St. Lawrence, 2. Characterize the spatial structure of the communities of the St. Lawrence, 3. Evaluate the vulnerability of biological communities to multiple stressors, and 4. Evaluate cumulative impacts on the communities of the St. Lawrence from the cartography of stressors (Obj. 1) and communities (Obj. 2), as well as the vulnerability of communities to multiple stressors (Obj 3). My project aims at evaluating how multiple stressors interact to directly or indirectly affect interacting species. My ultimate objective is to support a shift towards a more proactive and holistic way of managing marine ecosystems, which also closely correlates with the process of establishing protected areas.