Steve Redpath

Steve Redpath
University of Aberdeen | ABDN · Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences

BSc & PhD - Leeds Uni

About

251
Publications
99,549
Reads
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9,750
Citations
Introduction
I am an ecologist and conservation scientist focused on developing interdisciplinary approaches to understand and transform biodiversity conflicts. https://www.conservationconflicts.info/
Additional affiliations
October 2016 - May 2018
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Position
  • Professor
May 2007 - present
University of Aberdeen
July 2004 - July 2005
IREC
Position
  • Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas - CSIC

Publications

Publications (251)
Article
Full-text available
Conservation conflicts are increasing and need to be managed to minimise negative impacts on biodiversity, human livelihoods, and human well-being. Here, we explore strategies and case studies that highlight the long-term, dynamic nature of conflicts and the challenges to their management. Conflict management requires parties to recognise problems...
Article
Full-text available
Conflicts between people over wildlife are widespread and damaging to both the wildlife and people involved. Such issues are often termed human–wildlife conflicts. We argue that this term is misleading and may exacerbate the problems and hinder resolution. A review of 100 recent articles on human–wildlife conflicts reveals that 97 were between cons...
Article
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Finding effective ways of conserving large carnivores is widely recognised as a priority in Conservation. However, there is disagreement about the most effective way to do this, with some favouring top-down “command and control” approaches and others, collaborative approaches. Arguments for coercive top-down approaches have been presented elsewhere...
Article
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Our ability to apply ecological knowledge to improve the management of biodiversity and natural resources is in large part dependent on the way we interact with local communities across the world. While the need for engagement is clear in both scientific and policy contexts, ecologists and practitioners often have little formal training in how we s...
Article
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Identifying patterns of wildlife crime is a major conservation challenge. Here, we test whether deaths or disappearances of a protected species, the hen harrier, are associated with grouse moors, which are areas managed for the production of red grouse for recreational shooting. Using data from 58 satellite tracked hen harriers, we show high rates...
Article
Efforts to manage conservation conflicts are typically focused on reconciling disputes between opposing stakeholders over conservation objectives. However, this is an oversimplification of conflict dynamics, driven by the difficulties of understanding and addressing deeper-rooted issues. In this study, an ethnographic approach using a combination o...
Article
Poaching is a global driver of wildlife population decline, including inside protected areas (PAs). Reducing poaching requires an understanding of its cryptic drivers and accurately quantifying poaching scales and intensity. There is little quantification of how poaching is affected by law enforcement intensity (e.g., ranger stations) versus econom...
Article
Agricultural damage by geese is a growing problem in Europe and farmers play a key role in the emerging multilevel adaptive management system. This study explored how characteristics associated with the farmer and the farm, along with experience of damage, cognitive appraisals, emotions, and management beliefs were associated with the perceived ada...
Article
Facilitating coexistence between people and large carnivores is critical for large carnivore conservation in human-dominated landscapes, when their presence impacts negatively on human interests. Such situations will often require novel ways of mediating between different values, worldviews and opinions about how carnivores should be managed. We re...
Article
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Conflicts between biodiversity conservation and other human activities are multifaceted. Understanding farmer preferences for various conflict mitigation strategies is therefore critical. We developed a novel interactive game around farmer land management decisions across 18 villages in Gabon to examine responses to three elephant conflict mitigati...
Article
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Over the last 40 years, many goose populations have recovered from historic lows and are now more numerous than ever. At the same time, geese have shifted from natural foraging habitats to securing most of their nutritional demands from agricultural fields, leading to crop damage and conflict with agriculture. We studied field use by Greylag Geese...
Article
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Conservation conflicts exist in complex socio‐ecological systems and are damaging to both people and wildlife. There is much interest in designing interventions to manage them more effectively, but the importance of who does the intervening remains underexplored. In particular, conflicts are influenced by perceptions of the trustworthiness of natur...
Thesis
Full-text available
Disagreements over wild species and the management of natural resources are inevitable. However, they often serve as proxies for less visible, deep-rooted social and political conflicts that occur between multiple groups of human actors. Such issues can considerably hinder the objectives of conservation and sustainable environmental management, by...
Article
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Disagreements and disputes over the management of predatory animals are a frequent feature of conservation conflicts. In the UK, there are long‐standing conflicts surrounding legal and illegal killing of predators as part of management fostering game species as quarry for sport shooting. Despite the central role of gamekeepers as stakeholders and a...
Article
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Predictive models are sorely needed to guide the management of harvested natural resources worldwide, yet existing frameworks fail to integrate the dynamic and interacting governance processes driving unsustainable use. We developed a new framework in which the conflicting interests of three key stakeholders are modeled: managers seeking sustainabi...
Article
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Human activity affecting the welfare of wild vertebrates, widely accepted to be sentient, and therefore deserving of moral concern, is widespread. A variety of motives lead to the killing of individual wild animals. These include to provide food, to protect stock and other human interests, and also for sport. The acceptability of such killing is wi...
Article
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Humans have lived alongside and interacted with wild animals throughout evolutionary history. Even though wild animals can damage property, or injure humans and domesticated animals, not all interactions between humans and wildlife are negative. Yet, research has tended to focus disproportionately on negative interactions leading to negative outcom...
Article
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Ecologists quantify animal diets using direct and indirect methods, including analysis of faeces, pellets, prey items and gut contents. For stable isotope analyses of diet, Bayesian stable isotope mixing models (BSIMMs) are increasingly used to infer the relative importance of food sources to consumers. Although a powerful approach, it has been har...
Article
There is growing interest in developing effective interventions to manage socially and environmentally damaging conservation conflicts. There are a variety of intervention strategies that can be applied in various contexts, but the reasons one type of intervention is chosen over another remain underexplored. We surveyed conservation researchers and...
Article
Vigilance is amongst the most universal of anti‐predator strategies and commonly declines with increasing group size. We experimentally manipulated predation risk in a system with a known relationship between group size and vigilance levels to explore whether this relationship changes in response to elevated predation risk. We investigated the vigi...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation biology is a value-laden discipline predicated on conserving biodiversity (Soulé 1985), a mission that does not always sit easily with objective science (Lackey 2007; Pielke 2007; Scott et al. 2007). While some encourage scientists to be responsible advocates for conservation (Garrard et al. 2016), others worry that objectivity in cons...
Article
The way in which research-based knowledge is used, interpreted and communicated by different actors can influence the dynamics of conservation conflicts. The conflict that occurs between grouse shooting interests and the conservation of birds of prey in Scotland is notoriously complex, involving multiple actors at multiple levels, and shaped by the...
Article
Stakeholder cooperation can be vital in managing conservation conflicts. Laboratory experiments show cooperation is less likely in the presence of uncertainty. Much less is known about how stakeholders in real‐life conservation conflicts respond to different types of uncertainty. We tested the effects of different sources of uncertainty on cooperat...
Data
S1 Details relating to time series of management effort
Data
S5 Autocorrelation coefficients for flyway counts of Svalbard pink‐footed geese and hunting bags in Jutland and Nord‐Trøndelag
Data
S6 Estimated trend in the ratio of monetary payments to scaring expenses for both the Islay and Örebro case studies
Article
Full-text available
Conflicts between people over wildlife management are damaging, widespread, and notoriously difficult to resolve where people hold different values and worldviews. Cognitive approaches examining steps from human thought to action can help us understand conflict and explore strategies for their management. We focused on the conflict between hunters...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation conflicts are widespread and are damaging for biodiversity, livelihoods and human well-being. Conflict management often occurs through interventions targeting human behaviour. Conservation interventions are thought to be made more effective if underpinned by evidence and a Theory of Change-a logical argument outlining the steps require...
Article
Conservation conflicts represent complex multilayered problems that are challenging to study. We explore the utility of theoretical, experimental, and constructivist approaches to games to help to understand and manage these challenges. We show how these approaches can help to develop theory, understand patterns in conflict, and highlight potential...
Article
Full-text available
Many migratory bird species are undergoing population declines as a result of potentially multiple, interacting mechanisms. Understanding the environmental associations of spatial variation in population change can help tease out the likely mechanisms involved. Common Cuckoo Cuculus canorus populations have declined by 69% in England but increased...
Article
How do we deal with people who have different values and views about conservation? This question is central to the recent paper by Vucetich et al. (2018). They argue that mediator-led, collaborative processes are inadequate for dealing with conservation conflicts, in part because they are implicitly anthropocentric and ignore the intrinsic values o...
Article
Full-text available
The management of conflicts between wildlife conservation and agricultural practices often involves the implementation of strategies aimed at reducing the cost of wildlife impacts on crops. Vital to the success of these strategies is the perception that changes in management efforts are synchronised relative to changes in impact levels, yet this ex...
Article
Game bird management has the potential to benefit conservation, as management practices specifically targeted at reducing the factors limiting game populations may have positive effects on non-game species. However, such management may also have costs to species. 2.We review the literature that examines the effect of different forms of game bird ma...
Article
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Habitat suitability models are useful to understand species distribution and to guide management and conservation strategies. The grey wolf (Canis lupus) has been extirpated from most of its historic range in Pakistan primarily due to its impact on livestock and livelihoods. We used non-invasive survey data from camera traps and genetic sampling to...
Article
The high mountain ranges of South and Central Asia are increasingly being exposed to large-scale development projects. These areas are home to traditional pastoralist communities and internationally important biodiversity including the endangered snow leopard Panthera uncia. Development projects rely on economic cost-benefit analysis, but the ecosy...
Article
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The role of international legal instruments in biodiversity conservation has until now received relatively little attention in the conservation literature. Nevertheless, with their long-term, legally binding commitments on a transboundary scale, such instruments can be important, sometimes indispensable, implements in the conservation toolbox. Afte...
Article
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Many conservation professionals are familiar with the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS), the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the Ramsar Convention, and the World Heritage Convention. Regional instruments, such as those focusing on Africa, Antarctica, or Europe, are a...
Article
Full-text available
1. Conflict between conservation objectives and human livelihoods is ubiquitous and can be highly damaging, but the processes generating it are poorly understood. Ecological elements are central to conservation conflict, and changes in their dynamics – for instance due to anthropogenic environmental change – are likely to influence the emergence of...
Article
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Background Most birds exhibit bi-parental care with both sexes providing food for their young. Nestling signal food needs through begging. However, for some species, males rarely visit the nest, so have limited opportunity for gaining information directly from the chicks. Instead, females beg when males deliver food. We tested whether this calling...
Article
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In a world of shrinking habitats and increasing competition for natural resources, potentially dangerous predators bring the challenges of coexisting with wildlife sharply into focus. Through interdisciplinary collaboration between authors trained in the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences, this paper offers a review of current approac...
Article
Full-text available
An increasing proportion of the world’s poor is rearing livestock today, and the global livestock population is growing. Livestock predation by large carnivores and their retaliatory killing is becoming an economic and conservation concern. A common recommendation for carnivore conservation and for reducing predation on livestock is to increase wil...
Article
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As a result of ecological and social drivers, the management of problems caused by wildlife is becoming more selective, often targeting specific animals. Narrowing the sights of management relies upon the ecology of certain 'problem individuals' and their disproportionate contribution to impacts upon human interests. We assess the ecological eviden...
Article
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Negative interactions between humans and wildlife are increasing, often leading to conflict between different stakeholders over appropriate management interventions. We experimentally tested whether introducing trained Harris's hawks (Parabuteo unicinctus) through falconry could be an effective management tool to reduce nuisance Egyptian geese (Alo...
Article
Full-text available
In a world of shrinking habitats and increasing competition for natural resources, potentially dangerous predators bring the challenges of coexisting with wildlife sharply into focus. Through interdisciplinary collaboration between authors trained in the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences, this paper offers a review of current approac...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence suggests that religion is an important driver of peoples’ attitudes toward nature, but the link between religion and carnivore conservation is poorly understood. We examined peoples’ attitudes in Buddhist (n = 83) and Muslim communities (n = 111) toward snow leopards (Panthera uncia) and wolves (Canis lupus) in Ladakh, India. We found that...
Chapter
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Retaliatory killing of snow leopards in response to predation on livestock is an important cause of their endangerment, and a livelihood challenge for local communities. We review the ecological and anthropogenic causes of livestock predation. We show that this conservation conflict has multiple dimensions, including the reality of livestock damage...
Article
Full-text available
Growing pressure on natural resources is leading to more conservation conflicts. Governments and their statutory agencies devote increasing financial and human resources to this subject, but tend to adopt reactive, ad hoc approaches to management. 2.We combined theory and empirical data about five conservation conflicts in a transdisciplinary colla...
Article
Full-text available
The protection of biodiversity is a key national and international policy objective. While protected areas provide one approach, a major challenge lies in understanding how the conservation of biodiversity can be achieved in the context of multiple land management objectives in the wider countryside. Here we analyse metrics of bird diversity in the...
Data
Species List. Alphabetical list of all bird species recorded during surveys and indication of whether a species is included in the ordination plots (all species were included in the analysis, but for clarity not all species are shown in Fig 2). (DOCX)
Data
Large versions of all the ordination plots presented in Fig 2 provided for ease of reading. (PDF)