Stephen Turner

Stephen Turner
University of South Florida | USF · Department of Philosophy

Ph.D.

About

264
Publications
58,145
Reads
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2,628
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 1975 - present
University of South Florida
Position
  • Distinguished University Professor
September 1975 - May 1988
University of South Florida St. Petersburg
Position
  • Assistant Professor to Graduate Reseach Professor

Publications

Publications (264)
Book
https://books.emeraldinsight.com/page/detail/mad-hazard/?k=9781803826707
Article
This is a commentary on William Lynch’s Minority Report, which is a synthesis of the last 75 years of STS writings with philosophical themes from Lakatos, Feyerabend, and others. The comment questions the continued relevance of older ideas of scientific opinion which rested on the supposed autonomy of scientists in the face of the present grant sys...
Article
The phenomenon of sacrifice was a major problem in nineteenth century social thought about religion for a variety of reasons. These surfaced in a spectacular way in a German trial in which the most prominent Jewish philosopher of the century, the neo-Kantian Hermann Cohen, was asked to be an expert witness. The text he produced on the nature of Jud...
Poster
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Faculty of Philosophy at Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań and Polish Philosophical Association, Poznań Division invite for an online discussion on the book of Giacomo Borbone, "The Relevance of Models. Idealization and Concretization in Leszek Nowak" (Műnchen: Grin Verlag 2021). The participants will be: Francesco Coniglione (Catania University,...
Article
Martin Bulmer made distinguished and groundbreaking contributions to the history of sociology, particularly in his classic study of the Chicago School, which spanned the era of personal memory and archival history. His work particularly emphasized empirical research, which led him to problems relating to the Laura Spelman Rockefeller fund and its l...
Chapter
Angenommen, zu Kants Lebzeiten hätte jemand die prophetische Frage aufgeworfen, welche theologischen und moralischen Konzepte die kommenden zwei Jahrhunderte im öffentlichen Diskurs überdauern würden.
Chapter
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This is a history of the concept of post tradition from the interwar period to the postwar period, concentrating on Bellah, MacIntyre and Giddens.
Article
This is a review essay on Charles Camic's book on Veblen, which is critical of its circularity and failure to address the bulk of Veblen's work, which was published after he left Stanford. The polemical point of the book was that Veblen was an academic insider schooled by the finest and best connected economists and never left the fold. Only by ign...
Article
The classics of social theory have a peculiar status: our current list is the product of past academic strategizing, and the list of favored classics has changed. Currently there is a process of replacing them with older writers who better fit current concerns, and to cancel those who hold the wrong views, or are of the oppressor class, in order to...
Chapter
This paper traces the development of anti-populism in American political thought, with an emphasis on the writings of Woodrow Wilson and the reactions to them. These defended the idea fo a European-style professional administration with discretionary power in place of elected officials, and dismissed the issue of democratic accountability. The reas...
Article
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This is a commentary in a symposium on Gabor Biro's book on Polanyi's economics in the thirties, which discusses the social theory aspects of his thought, his Third Way thinking, and its evolution.
Article
This is a brief response to comments by Struan Jacobs and Peter Blum on The Calling of Social Thought, Rediscovering the Work of Edward Shils, a recent collection of essays edited by Christopher Adair-Toteff and Stephen Turner. It identifies a distinctive contribution of Shils to the larger problem of the tacit.
Article
Rates of crime for Blacks in the United States in the post-slavery era have always been high relative to Whites. But explaining, or minimizing, this fact faces a major problem: individual excuses for bad acts point to deficiencies, in the agent, which are perhaps forgivable, such as mental deficiency or a deprived childhood, but at the price of tre...
Chapter
This book evaluates the potential of the pragmatist notion of habit possesses to influence current debates at the crossroads between philosophy, cognitive sciences, neurosciences, and social theory. It deals with the different aspects of the pragmatic turn involved in 4E cognitive science and traces back the roots of such a pragmatic turn to both c...
Article
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Freud was a major cultural and intellectual influence in the twentieth century, whose significance waned. Kaye’s exposition argues that part of the reason is that his presentation of himself as a medical scientist obscured his true interest in society and thus the social theory that informed his commentary on culture. In support of this argument he...
Article
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Discusses changes in science and their relevance for understanding the norms of science and the rise of compliance and external control, as science has, under the current regimes of evaluation and grant competition, as well as commercialization, transformed. It also asks whether the kind of inquiry into fundamental questions celebrated in The Doubl...
Preprint
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This paper addresses the question of what "democratic values" are, and concludes that apart from the democratic norm of submission to the majority, the additional central and perhaps only value is accountability.
Chapter
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Conventional accounts of liberal democracy tend to obscure a basic fact: the phenomenon of administration. The American reception of the administrative state was self-consciously imitative of Continental models of state bureaucracy, as a remedy for the ills of democratic politics, but construed as a means of saving democracy from itself, and from l...
Article
Characterizing science as a public good, as Steve Fuller notes, is a part of an ideological construal of science, linked to a particular portrayal of science in the postwar era that was designed to provide a rationale for the funding of pure or basic science. The image of science depended on the idea of scientists as autonomous truth-seekers. But t...
Preprint
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This is an overview of 19th cognitive science thinking by social theorists and neo-Kantians, and explains how the standard social science model emerged and eclipsed the promising start made by Spencer.
Article
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Tradução de “From Education to Expertise: Sociology as a ‘Profession’” de William Buxton e Stephen Turner. O artigo foi publicado originalmente em Terence Halliday e Morris Janowitz (eds.). Sociology and its Publics. The Forms and Fates of Disciplinary Organizations. Chicago, University of Chicago Press. p. 373-407, 1992. Traduzido por Juan Pedro B...
Chapter
Christopher Dawson identified with sociology, wrote extensively for the original Sociological Review, was a stalwart of the Sociological Society in the interwar years, achieved international recognition as a sociologist, engaged with Karl Mannheim and the Moot, and in the postwar period defended meta-history and the sociologically oriented historic...
Article
“Science as a Vocation” describes an ideal of scholarship for a vanished world. Images of the past university still color our idea of the university. Weber dispelled illusions about the university of his own time, and pointed to its cruelty and irrationality. Veblen did something similar for the American university of his time, defended a similar i...
Article
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Verstehen, understanding another human being through some form of empathy, is a natural process with the involvement, probably in a complex way, of the brain. There is a temptation to describe Verstehen in a way that mystifies it, or to collapse it into more general considerations about mind reading. The social science tradition, however, points in...
Chapter
One of Ian C. Jarvie’s most interesting contributions is his discussion of the thinking of Karl Popper and Michael Polanyi on the nature and workings of the scientific community and their relation to politics (Philosophy of Science 68(4): 545–564, 2001). The self-image these thinkers contributed to still lingers, but their accounts capture a histor...
Article
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In the symposium devoted to the Prague Spring of 1968, 14 sociologists and political scientists recall how they experienced the Prague Spring and reflect on the significance of the Czechoslovak reform movement for the present day. The symposium includes contributions from Johann P. Arnason (Iceland/Czech Republic), Richard Flacks (USA), John A. Hal...
Book
The rise of cognitive neuroscience is the most important scientific and intellectual development of the last thirty years. Findings pour forth, and major initiatives for brain research continue. The social sciences have responded to this development slowly-for good reasons. The implications of particular controversial findings, such as the discover...
Article
The belief-desire model of action explanation is deeply ingrained in multiple disciplines. There is reason to think that it is a cultural artifact. But is there an alternative? In this discussion, I will consider the radical critique of this action explanation model by Rüdiger Bittner, which argues that the model appeals to dubious mental entities,...
Book
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The purpose of this book is to discuss the revival of analytical philosophy of history proposed by Paul A. Roth, a world-known analytical philosopher of the social sciences and the humanities.The first four papers outline the reasons for the decline of philosophy of history, its present phase of development, and its possible future. The other autho...
Article
This comment on Frodeman and Briggle’s Socrates Tenured raises questions about the project of applying philosophy or philosophical skills to wicked problems such as terrorism. By definition, these problems cannot be solved by appeal to principles, but involve conflicting values and goals. The societal problems to which the book refers are of this k...
Chapter
There is little doubt about the importance of Emile Durkheim’s work and the influence it had on the social sciences. His insights into the realms of normativity in particular remain an inspiring mine of information for theoretical reflection and empirical analyses. While his strengths, as we know nowadays, might not have always laid in systematic a...
Article
Book Review of: Per Wisselgren, The Social Scientific Gaze: The Social Question and the Rise of Academic Social Science in SwedenSurrey, UK: Ashgate Publishing, 2015ISBN: 9781472447593Price: $121,20
Article
Edward Shils was a prominent American sociologist and social theorist who spent much of his career in Britain. He was the translator of Karl Mannheim and collaborator with Talcott Parsons. His own social theory concentrated on the relation of primary groups and intellectuals to the center of society, which he conceived of in terms of its charismati...
Article
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Publishing is changing rapidly, though these changes are concealed from academics, who are presented the appearances of the old world of print. The economic incentives and consequently the strategies of publishers have, however, changed. Where quality was once the road to profit, content now is, and novel digital delivery systems are the key to sal...
Article
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Wilfrid Sellars described the moral syllogism that supports the inference “I ought to do x” from “Everyone ought to do x” as a “syntactical disguise” which embodies a “mistake.” He nevertheless regarded this form of reasoning as constitutive of the moral point of view. Durkheim was the source of much of this reasoning, and this context illuminates...
Article
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Wilfrid Sellars read and annotated Celestine Bouglé’s Evolution of Values, translated by his mother with an introduction by his father (1926). The book expounded Émile Durkheim's account of morality and elaborated his account of origins of value in collective social life. Sellars replaced elements of this account in constructing his own conception...
Article
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The problem of holism in social science has, as Zahle and Collin, the editors of this volume note, a long history. It has revived, however, in a peculiar way, inspired by such things as the literature on corporate responsibility in ethics, the idea of supervenience, “Critical Realism” in sociology, ideas about emergence, the use of game-theoretic m...
Article
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Christian Smith is an insider of sorts—a product of Harvard with a past at North Carolina, a member of the exclusive Sociological Research Association, who publishes in conventional journals, does survey research, and runs a research center at Notre Dame. He also, however, writes books, some of which articulate his vision of the good life, which go...
Conference Paper
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The Progressives were surrounded by, and typically claimed to be acting on, expert knowledge, knowledge closely associated with the new social sciences, especially sociology, which did not clearly distinguish itself from reformism until the twenties. They were also deeply motivated by unusual views of their fellow humans. Each of these presents his...
Article
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Peter Baehr, Katelin Albert, Eleanore Townsley and Neil Gross raise a variety of issues in relation to American Sociology: From Pre-Disciplinary to Post-Normal (2014a). In response, I defend the claim that the revival of sociology enrollments after the 1980s owes something to the concentration on gender issues and the feminization of sociology. I d...
Article
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A questão-chave para tentar aplicar os resultados da neurociência a tópicos sociais é a correspondência: qual é a relação entre os conceitos sociais ordinários ou os conceitos da ciência social e suas realizações físicas no cérebro? A resposta depende do que se apresenta para a correspondência em cada um dos lados. Os conceitos da ciência social el...
Article
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Dorothy Emmet, in two books, one of which was based on extensive personal contact with Robert Merton and Columbia sociology, provides the closest thing we have to an authorized philosophical defense of Merton. It features a deflationary account of functionalism which dispenses with the idea of general teleological ends. What it replaces it with is...
Article
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The key question for attempts at applying neuroscience results to social topics is matching: what is the relation between ordinary social and social science concepts and their physical realizations in brain processes? Answering this question depends on what is available on each side to match. The concepts of social science produced under the influe...
Article
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Max Weber is now owned by a scholarly industry, with its own dedicated journal, Max Weber Studies, and an increasingly distant relation to the discipline that made him famous in the first place, sociology. Despite this, Weber, as a topic, flourishes. His letters and edited writings continue to appear as part of the vast Max Weber Gesamtausgabe proj...
Article
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Mark Bevir raises the question of how genealogy, understood as a technique-based radical historicism, and the notion of the contingency of ideas, ground critique. His problem is to avoid the relativism of radical historicism in a way that allows for critique without appealing to non-radical historicist absolutisms of the kind that ground the notion...
Chapter
As career paths in academic life began to be open to sociology Ph.D.s in the 1920s, the discipline began to change. Reformist topics still predominated, but the mix of topics gradually changed, and began to reflect such concerns as measurement. The Rockefeller philanthropies, whose aims were ultimately reformist, stressed the need for more realisti...
Chapter
The crisis of the 1970s was in the first place a crisis of declining enrollments that created a crisis of employment for new Ph.D.s. Sociologists had been associated with, and promoted, Lyndon Johnson’s ‘Great Society’ welfare efforts, and when these came to be discredited, condemned sociology as a brand. A bitter generational conflict ensued betwe...
Chapter
American sociology emerged out of a large universe of non-academic reform organizations, primarily in connection with measures to reduce ‘dependency’, but including a vast array of ‘progressive’ causes. These organizations and the movements they represented made knowledge claims and presented themselves as experts, but were oriented to public educa...
Chapter
Characterizing present sociology requires a change in historical perspective from a focus on ideas and programs. The relevant features are politicization, feminization, and caste-like hierarchy, which are not entirely consistent with one another. But if we put aside nostalgia for the idea of sociology as a science, sociology can be understood as a...
Chapter
The collapse in demand for sociology degrees had many consequences. With the collapse in enrollments sociologists had to cater to student preferences. Elite departments, which were not dependent on undergraduate enrollments, were partly immune from these pressures, but throughout the discipline and in the American Sociological Association, toleranc...
Chapter
Graduate students are highly aware of the career consequences of first appointments and the importance of publications in the American Sociological Review and the American Journal of Sociology. Getting an elite appointment is nevertheless a lottery: only about one in twenty of the graduates in top-twenty departments get first appointments at this l...
Chapter
At the end of the Second World War, the stage was set for a new generational change, influenced in part by new sources of funding and a shift in power to private universities, notably Harvard and Columbia. This led to a division: the public universities of the Midwest continued their own heavily statistical traditions, but were outshone by the prog...
Chapter
The university changed during the 1960s and 1970s as a result of the demand for Black studies programs: the idea of an academic program that openly took sides in a cause or for a group became accepted. Women followed suit: the organization Sociologists for Women in Society grew out of protests at the ASA. The SWS was successful in achieving its goa...
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The blogosphere is loathed and feared by the press, expert-opinion makers, and representatives of authority generally. Part of this is based on a social theory: that there are implicit and explicit social controls governing professional journalists and experts that make them responsible to the facts. These controls don't exist for bloggers or the p...
Article
This book collects case studies and theoretical papers on expertise, focusing on four major themes: legitimation, the aggregation of knowledge, the distribution of knowledge and the distribution of power. It focuses on the institutional means by which the distribution of knowledge and the distribution of power are connected, and how the problems of...
Article
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The concepts of "collective" and "social" are routinely confused, with claims about collective facts and their necessity justified by evidence that involves only social or interactional facts. This is the case with Harry Colllins' argument for tacit knowledge as well. But the error is deeply rooted in the history of philosophy, in the notion of sha...
Article
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Social science has for the most part lost its ambition to be 'science', as shown in the recent change in the American Anthropological Association statement of purpose. The new term is expertise. The change points to something fundamental: social science methods are now largely stable; they have well-developed uses for public and policy audiences; b...
Article
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Explanations implicitly end with something that makes sense, and begin with something that does not make sense. A statistical relationship, for example, a numerical fact, does not make sense; an explanation of this relationship adds something, such as causal information, which does make sense, and provides an endpoint for the sense-making process....
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Sociology once debated ‘the social’ and did so with a public readership. Even as late as the Second World War, sociologists commanded a wide public on questions about the nature of society, altruism and the direction of social evolution. As a result of several waves of professionalization, however, these issues have vanished from academic sociology...
Article
Tacit knowledge is both a ubiquitous and puzzling notion, related to the idea of hidden assumptions. The puzzle is partly a result of the conflict between the idea that assumptions are in the mind and the apparent audience‐relativity of the "fact" of possessing an assumption or of the tacit knowledge that is articulated. If we think of making the t...
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Argument This paper builds on a neglected philosophical idea, Evidenz . Max Weber used it in his discussion of Verstehen , as the goal of understanding either action or such things as logic. It was formulated differently by Franz Brentano, but with a novel twist: that anyone who understood something would see the thing to be understood as self-evid...
Article
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This commentary on the anniversaries of Kuhn's Structure and Latour's Science in Action describes the demise in science studies of "knowledge" as a topic. The issues are in part a result of the toxic inheritance of neo-Kantianism, with the problematic naturalization of its basis strategy of explaining by presuppositions, which in fact do not corres...
Chapter
The paper discusses several key issues: Complexity; : The Positivism Dispute; and the Three Paths from Kant, to the failure of Neo - Kantianism, and its relation to current problems in philosophy and sociology.
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This paper explains the meaning of the two key terms in Weber's probabilistic account of causality, which was derived from von Kries. The terms have a technical significance that is concealed by the labels-- objective possibility is the hypothetical probability derived by subtracting a condition from a set of putatively causal conditions. Adequate...

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