Stephen Pumfrey

Stephen Pumfrey
Lancaster University | LU · Department of History

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17
Publications
1,534
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152
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Previous research in conceptual history, the study of change over time of key terms and value systems, has been carried out manually using a restricted number of pre-identified texts. We propose that a method combining techniques from corpus and computational linguistics can be exploited to support conceptual history with semantic searches on a vas...
Article
For all of his failures to secure patronage, John Dee was successful compared with his contemporaries. We know more about his patronage relations than those of any other natural philosopher in Tudor England. Only by comparing him with other English client practitioners can we understand how unusual and even productive were Dee’s relations with his...
Article
This article presents evidence that an anonymous publication of 1573, a Letter sent by a gentleman of England [concerning …] the myraculous starre nowe shyning, was written by Thomas Digges, England's first Copernican. It tells the story of how it arose out of research commissioned by Elizabeth I's privy counsellors in response to the conventional...
Article
ParryG. J. R.. A Protestant Vision: William Harrison and the Reformation of Elizabethan England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987. Pp. ix + 348. ISBN 0-521-32997-3. £27.50. - Volume 21 Issue 4 - Stephen Pumfrey
Article
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July 2009 is the 400th anniversary of the first telescopic observations of the Moon, made by the English scientist Thomas Harriot. Galileo's later drawings were more influential, but some historians now question the traditional view that Harriot's were inferior. Galileo's revealed the mountainous topography of the Moon, but Harriot's arguably had t...
Article
L'article est la premiere etude de patronage en Angleterre de 1570 a 1625 et demontre que la culture du patronage anglais differe par rapport a ce qui est devenu un paradigme dans les cours italiennes ou allemandes. D'autre part, les formes de connaissance naturelle different du paradigme continental. Il est evident que les clients anglais ne sont...
Article
When William Gilbert of Colchester died on 30 November 1603, England lost one of its greatest Elizabethan scientists. Three years earlier he had published a book called De Magnete, which was nothing less than the first ever work of experimental physics. Its fuller title, translated from the original Latin, was On the Magnet, Magnetic Bodies and tha...
Chapter
This chapter re-examines the events of 1612, combining a close reading of Thomas Potts's 1613 book, “The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches in the Countie of Lancaster,” with evidence from other areas to place it in a particular context: the politics of witch-hunting and royal patronage. The chapter sheds light not only on how the trials were constru...
Article
Full-text available
The growth of modern science has been accompanied by the growth of professionalization. We can unquestionably speak of professional science since the nineteenth century, although historians dispute about where, when and how much. It is much more problematic and anachronistic to do so of the late seventeenth century, despite the familiar view that t...
Article
As sociologists learn more about how scientific knowledge is created, they give historians the opportunity to rework their accounts from a more contextual perspective. It is relatively easy to do so in areas with large theoretical, cosmological or overtly ideological components. It is more difficult, but equally necessary, to open up very empirical...
Article
RonanC. A.. The Shorter Science and Civilisation in China. Volume 3. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986. Pp. ix + 298. ISBN 0-521-25272-5, £30.00, $49.50 (hardback); 0-521-31560-3, £12.50, $19.95 (paperback). - Volume 20 Issue 3 - Stephen Pumfrey
Article
The magnet served three interests of Restoration mechanical philosophers: it provided a model of cosmic forces, it suggested a solution to the problem of longitude determination, and evidence of its corpuscular mechanism would silence critics. An implicit condition of William Gilbert's ‘magnetic philosophy’ was the existence of a unique, immaterial...
Article
Full-text available
Zoilus (centre right) meets Demos (centre left) and is crowned by Polis.

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