Stephen Maberly

Stephen Maberly
UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology | CEH · UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology Lancaster

BSc, PhD

About

219
Publications
49,224
Reads
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Introduction
Stephen Maberly has recently retired from the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology at Lancaster but is continuing as a UKCEH Fellow. He continues to undertake research on many aspects of limnology, from global scale studies to details of the biogeochemistry and physiology of photosynthesis in microalgae and macrophytes.
Additional affiliations
January 2004 - November 2015
UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
Position
  • Lake Ecosystems Group

Publications

Publications (219)
Article
Most lakes are oversaturated with CO2 and are net CO2 sources to the atmosphere, yet their contribution to the global carbon cycle is poorly constrained. Their CO2 excess is widely attributed to in-lake oxidation of terrestrially produced dissolved organic carbon. Here we use data collected over 26 years to show that the CO2 in 20 lakes is primaril...
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Most aquatic photoautotrophs depend on CO 2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to maintain productivity at ambient concentrations of CO 2 , and carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays a key role in these processes. Here we present different lines of evidence showing that the protein LCIP63, identified in the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, is a CA. Howe...
Article
Unlike in land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to carbon dioxide (CO 2) to compensate for the low diffusivity and potential depletion of CO 2 in water. Concentrations of bicarbonate and CO 2 vary greatly with catchment geology. In this study, we investigate whether there is a link between these concen...
Article
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Water temperature is critical for the ecology of lakes. However, the ability to predict its spatial and seasonal variation is constrained by the lack of a thermal classification system. Here we define lake thermal regions using objective analysis of seasonal surface temperature dynamics from satellite observations. Nine lake thermal regions are ide...
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Inland standing waters are particularly vulnerable to increasing water temperature. Here, using a high-resolution numerical model, we find that the velocity of climate change in the surface of inland standing waters globally was 3.5±2.3 km decade-1 from 1861-2005, which is similar to, or lower than, rates of active dispersal of some motile species....
Chapter
The productivity of terrestrial plants can be limited by water supply and high temperature, but these factors are often replaced in aquatic plants by low light and restricted inorganic carbon supply. Furthermore, oxygen concentrations in water can be over two times greater than air‐equilibrium and low diffusion will restrict losses from the chlorop...
Chapter
Productivity on planet Earth is largely dependent on the energy produced by hydrogen‐fusion reactions in the Sun. Life is a key part of the carbon cycle. The abiotic input of CO 2 degassing from volcanoes and metamorphism is only about one‐thousandth of the biogenic exchange fluxes of CO 2 through contemporary net primary production. Thus, one can...
Article
Satellite remote sensing data are important to the study of environment problems at a global scale. The GloboLakes project aimed to use satellite remote sensing data to investigate the response of the major lakes on Earth to environmental conditions and change. The main challenge to statistical modelling is the identification of the spatial structu...
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Dam construction is widespread, changing the hydrological and biogeochemical conditions and thereby the bacterial communities in the rivers of the earth. To date, knowledge is lacking about bacterial communities in cascade reservoirs. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities and potential functions of nine cascade hydropower reservoirs in 12...
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Climate change and other anthropogenic stressors have led to long-term changes in the thermal structure, including surface temperatures, deepwater temperatures, and vertical thermal gradients, in many lakes around the world. Though many studies highlight warming of surface water temperatures in lakes worldwide, less is known about long-term trends...
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Lake surfaces are warming worldwide, raising concerns about lake organism responses to thermal habitat changes. Species may cope with temperature increases by shifting their seasonality or their depth to track suitable thermal habitats, but these responses may be constrained by ecological interactions, life histories or limiting resources. Here we...
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A year of measurements by Doppler Current Profilers, a chain of temperature sensors and a suite of meteorological instruments has been analyzed to elucidate the seasonal cycle of the dynamical response of a temperate lake (Windermere) to surface forcing. The efficiency of energy input to the lake (Eff) was determined by comparing the rate of workin...
Article
Inorganic carbon availability can limit primary productivity and control species composition of freshwater phytoplankton. This is despite the presence of CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) in some species that maximize inorganic carbon uptake. We investigated the effects of inorganic carbon on the seasonal distribution, growth rates and photosynth...
Article
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Annual maximum lake surface temperature influences ecosystem structure and function and, in particular, the rates of metabolic activities, species survival and biogeography. Here, we evaluated 50 years of observational data, from 1966 to 2015, for ten European lakes to quantify changes in the annual maximum surface temperature and the duration abov...
Article
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Lake ecosystems, and the organisms that live within them, are vulnerable to temperature change1–5, including the increased occurrence of thermal extremes⁶. However, very little is known about lake heatwaves—periods of extreme warm lake surface water temperature—and how they may change under global warming. Here we use satellite observations and a n...
Chapter
Aims: We describe the different nutrients that phytoplankton require, their variation among phytoplankton groups and their different nutritional modes and acquisition mechanisms. We furthermore describe the consequences of nutrient scarcity and excess on competition among phytoplankton and the effects of anthropogenic nutrient enrichment on phytopl...
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Globally, lake surface water temperatures have warmed rapidly relative to air temperature, but changes in deepwater temperatures and vertical thermal structure are still largely unknown. We have compiled the most comprehensive data set to date of long-term (1970-2009) summertime vertical temperature profiles in lakes across the world to examine tre...
Article
The freshwater monocot Ottelia alismoides is the only known species to operate three CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs): constitutive HCO3--use and C4 photosynthesis, and facultative Crassulacean acid metabolism, but the mechanism of HCO3- use is unknown. We found that the inhibitor of an anion exchange (AE) protein, 4,4'-diisothio-cyanatostilbene...
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Diatoms belong to a major, diverse and species-rich eukaryotic clade, the Heterokonta, within the polyphyletic chromalveolates. They evolved as a result of secondary endosymbiosis with one or more Plantae ancestors, but their precise evolutionary history is enigmatic. Nevertheless, this has conferred them with unique structural and biochemical prop...
Article
Anthropogenic nutrient enrichment is a major and widespread ecological problem (Le Moal et al. 2019). The consequent eutrophication can reduce the availability of useable water to human populations, increase the cost of supply, restrict recreational value and, where toxic algal blooms form, be a threat to human health. It also has major detrimental...
Article
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This Special Issue of Inland Waters (featuring 2 Special Sections spread across 2 issues) celebrates the contribution of Brian Moss to the science and management of freshwater ecosystems. Brian passed away in 2016, and since then much has been written about his life and achievements (Carvalho and Johnes 2016, Irvine and Barker 2016, Jeppesen and Jo...
Article
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Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) exist in all kingdoms of life. They are metalloenzymes, often containing zinc, that catalyze the interconversion of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide-a ubiquitous reaction involved in a variety of cellular processes. So far, eight classes of apparently evolutionary unrelated CAs that are present in a large diversity of living...
Article
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Many inland waters are enriched with nutrients, causing deleterious effects to their ecology and the benefits they provide for society, but their effective management first requires identification of the nutrient(s) that limit algal production. Concentrations of nutrients and chlorophyll a (Chl-a) were used to assess nutrient limitation seasonally...
Article
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The concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in freshwaters is increasing in large areas of the world. In addition to carbon, DOM contains nitrogen and phosphorus and there is growing concern that these organic nutrients may be bioavailable and contribute to eutrophication. However, relatively few studies have assessed the potential for diss...
Article
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Hydropower development is the key strategy in many developing countries for energy supply, climate change mitigation, and economic development. However, it is commonly assumed that river dams retain nutrients and therefore reduce downstream primary productivity and fishery catches, compromising food security and causing transboundary disputes. Cont...
Article
Background and aims: Ottelia alismoides (Hydrocharitaceae) is a freshwater macrophyte that, unusually, possesses three kinds of carbon dioxide-concentrating mechanisms. Here we describe its leaf anatomy and chloroplast ultrastructure, how they are altered by CO2 concentration and may underlie C4 photosynthesis. Methods: Light and transmission el...
Article
The effect of dams on dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) transport and riverine ecosystems is unclear in karst cascade reservoirs. Here, we analyzed water samples from a karst river system with seven cascade reservoirs along the Wujiang River, southwestern China, during one hydrological year. From upstream to downstream, the average concentration of...
Article
The role of sediment-bound organic phosphorus (Po) as an additional nutrient source is a component of internal P budgets in lake system that is usually neglected. Here we examined the relative importance of sediment Po to internal P load and the role of bioavailable Po in algal growth in Lake Erhai, China. Lake Erhai sediment extractable Po account...
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The annual minimum of lake surface water temperature influences ecological and biogeochemical processes, but variability and change in this extreme have not been investigated. Here, we analysed observational data from eight European lakes and investigated the changes in annual minimum surface water temperature. We found that between 1973 and 2014,...
Article
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Cyanobacterial blooms are an increasing threat to water quality and global water security caused by the nutrient enrichment of freshwaters. There is also a broad consensus that blooms are increasing with global warming, but the impacts of other concomitant environmental changes, such as an increase in extreme rainfall events, may affect this respon...
Article
An increase of dissolved organic carbon (DOC)in inland waters has been reported across the northern temperate region but the effects of this on whole lake ecosystems, often combined with other anthropogenic stressors like nutrient inputs and warming, are poorly known. The effects of these changes on different component of the ecosystem were assesse...
Article
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• Nutrient availability and climate have substantial effects on the structure and function of lakes. Predicted changes to climate (particularly temperature) over the 21st century are expected to adjust physical lake functions, changing thermal and nutrient use processes. Both increasing anthropogenic nutrient inputs and net reductions following rem...
Article
John (Jack) Francis Talling was a master limnologist who pioneered much of our understanding of the River Nile, the great lakes of the African Rift Valley and those of the English Lake District. He was one of the world's leading authorities on the ecophysiology of freshwater phytoplankton and specialized in the control of their productivity by ligh...
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The freshwater macrophyte, Ottelia alismoides, is a bicarbonate user performing C4 photosynthesis in the light, and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) when acclimated to low CO2. The regulation of the three mechanisms by CO2 concentration was studied in juvenile and mature leaves. For mature leaves, the ratios of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PE...
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Extreme weather can have a substantial influence on lakes and is expected to become more frequent with climate change. We explored the influence of one particular extreme event, Storm Ophelia, on the physical and chemical environment of England’s largest lake, Windermere. We found that the substantial influence of Ophelia on meteorological conditio...
Article
The National Trust (NT) is often associated in the public mind with stately homes and tearooms but as the largest private landowner in the UK (250,000 ha) and with over 5 million members, its potential reach as a conservation charity is significant. In recent years, the Trust has consciously reemphasised its role in nature conservation and at the h...
Article
Blooms of cyanobacteria are a current threat to global water security that is expected to increase in the future because of increasing nutrient enrichment, increasing temperature and extreme precipitation in combination with prolonged drought. However, the responses to multiple stressors, such as those above, are often complex and there is contradi...
Article
The emission of CO 2 to the atmosphere from inland waters is an important part of the global carbon cycle. In this study, we made spatial and temporal measurements of CO 2 partial pressure (pCO 2) along the Three Gorges Dam system. The pCO 2 ranged from 619 to 2383 μatm and was supersaturated relative to atmospheric CO 2. Further, pCO 2 showed obvi...
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Currently, dam construction is a main and growing global anthropogenic disturbance on rivers. Dams have major effects on the physics, chemistry, and biology of the original river, including altering water circulation and retention time, sedimentation, nutrient biogeochemical cycling (especially greenhouse gas emissions), and the amount and composit...
Technical Report
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Executive summary The consequences of eutrophication in lakes are many, including the potential degradation of important ecosystem services such as the provision of food, the supply of clean water for drinking and industrial use, the support of tourism and recreation, and the maintenance of species and habitats of high conservation value. Phospho...
Article
During a fish survey in Bassenthwaite Lake, Cumbria in 2013, a single young vendace (Coregonus albula) was unexpectedly caught in one of the nets. After a 12 year absence, during which it was thought to be extinct at this site, the vendace had returned! The elusive, mysterious vendace remains unknown to many, despite the fact it has been around wit...
Article
The global proliferation of harmful algal blooms poses an increasing threat to water resources, recreation and ecosystems. Predicting the occurrence of these blooms is therefore needed to assist water managers in making management decisions to mitigate their impact. Evaluation of the potential for forecasting of algal blooms using the phytoplankton...
Chapter
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Lakes are highly connected systems that are affected by a hierarchy of stressors operating at different scales, making them particularly sensitive to anthropogenic perturbation. Traditionally, lakes are studied as a whole system ‘from physics to fish’ and long-term monitoring programmes were initiated on this basis, some starting over a century ago...
Chapter
Aquatic plants, comprising different divisions of embryophytes, derive from terrestrial ancestors. They have evolved to live in water, both fresh and salty, an environment that presents unique challenges and opportunities for photosynthesis and growth. These include, compared to air, a low water stress, a greater density, and attenuation of light,...
Article
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In Plantae, the Calvin–Benson–Bassham (CBB) cycle is highly regulated and most of its enzymes have been thoroughly studied. Since diatoms arose as a result of secondary endosymbiosis with one or more Plantae ancestors, their precise evolutionary history is enigmatic and complex resulting in biochemical variations on the original CBB cycle theme. Th...
Article
Excessive algal blooms, some of which can be toxic, are the most obvious symptoms of nutrient enrichment and can be exacerbated by climate change. They cause numerous ecological problems and also economic costs to water companies. The process-representation of the algal community model PROTECH was tested within the extended Generalised Likelihood U...
Article
Inorganic phosphorus (Pi) is often the primary limiting nutrient in freshwater ecosystems. Since Pi-limitation affects energy transduction, and inorganic carbon (Ci) acquisition can be energy demanding, Ci-acquisition strategies were compared in four species of green algae grown under Pi-replete and Pi-limited conditions predominantly at low and pa...
Article
In aquatic environments, the concentration of inorganic carbon is spatially and temporally variable and CO2 can be substantially oversaturated or depleted. Depletion of CO2 plus low rates of diffusion cause inorganic carbon to be more limiting in aquatic than terrestrial environments, and the frequency of species with a CO2-concentrating mechanism...
Article
The presence of CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) is believed to be one of the characteristics that allows diatoms to thrive in many environments and to be major contributors to global productivity. Here, the type of CCM and the responses to variable CO2 concentration were studied in marine and freshwater diatoms. At 400 ppm, there was a large di...
Article
Ottelia alismoides is a constitutive C4 plant and bicarbonate user, and has facultative crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) at low CO2. Acclimation to a factorial combination of light and CO2 showed that the ratio of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) to ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) (>5) is in the range of that of C4 pla...
Article
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The concentration of CO2 in many aquatic systems is variable, often lower than the KM of the primary carboxylating enzyme Rubisco, and in order to photosynthesize efficiently, many algae operate a facultative CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM). Here we measured the responses of a marine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana, to high and low concentration...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Summary D5.1-1 Part 1: Multi-stressors on surface water and effects on ecological statusHumans have increased the discharge of pollution, altered water flow regime and modified the morphology of rivers. All these actions have resulted in multiple pressures on freshwater ecosystems, undermining their biodiversity and ecological functioning. The Euro...
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Carbon (C) and silicon (Si) biogeochemical cycles are important factors in the regulation of atmospheric CO2 concentrations and hence climate change. Theoretically, these elements are linked by chemical weathering and organism stoichiometry, but this coupling has not been investigated in freshwaters. Here we compiled data from global rivers and lak...
Article
The effect of CO2 supply is likely to play an important role in algal ecology. Since inorganic carbon (Ci ) acquisition strategies are very diverse among microalgae and Ci availability varies greatly within and among habitats, we hypothesized that Ci acquisition depends on the pH of their preferred natural environment (adaptation) and that the effi...
Article
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Palaeolimnological studies should ideally be based upon continuous, undisturbed sediment sequences with reliable chronologies. However for some lake cores, these conditions are not met and palaeolimnologists are often faced with dating puzzles caused by sediment disturbances in the past. This study chooses Esthwaite Water from England to illustrate...