Stephen M Haas

Stephen M Haas
University of Cincinnati | UC · Department of Communication

PhD

About

22
Publications
24,820
Reads
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1,548
Citations
Introduction
Research areas: Health Communication & Interpersonal Communication, specifically, (a) Relationship Maintenance in LGBTQ+ and different-sex couples (b) Social Support & Coping, (c) Uncertainty Management Theory, and (d) Patient Self-Advocacy in Doctor-Patient Communication
Additional affiliations
September 2001 - present
University of Cincinnati
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Research areas: Health Communication & Interpersonal Communication, specifically, (a) Relationship Maintenance (b) Social Support & Coping, (c) Uncertainty Management Theory, and (d) Patient Self-Advocacy in Doctor-Patient Communication

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
Because marriage has been denied to same-sex couples, it is likely that the meaning and significance ascribed to non-marital cohabitation may be unique. Further, it is unclear whether same-sex couples view marriage as important to their relationships, and if they do, why. Using qualitative data from 526 individuals in cohabiting same-sex relationsh...
Article
Unlabelled: Parents of children with complex chronic illnesses experience substantial uncertainty that is heightened when the condition is an "orphan" illness not belonging to one medical specialty. The current study explores uncertainty experienced by parents of children with "orphan" illnesses requiring multidisciplinary care. Method: Particip...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to explore how particular sources of social support (partners, friends, and family) affect the relationship maintenance of gay male couples in which one (HIV-discordant couples) or both partners have HIV or AIDS (HIV-concordant couples). Using a qualitative grounded theory approach (Glaser & Strauss, 1967), 40, one-hou...
Article
Full-text available
In the present study, we incorporate both routine and strategic maintenance behaviors in an expanded maintenance scale. In addition, we seek to determine whether sex or gender role is a stronger predictor of maintenance behaviors, and to ascertain the extent to which maintenance predicts the relational characteristics of satisfaction, commitment, l...
Article
Full-text available
Communication is a means of managing uncertainty. In a state of uncertainty: (a) information seeking can reduce uncertainty by allowing for better discrimination between or among alternatives; (b) information seeking can increase uncertainty by increasing the number of alternatives, or by blurring the distinction between or among alternatives; and...
Article
The Institute of Medicine has called for an increase in efforts to investigate the understudied area of LGBTQ health and relationships. This study furthers the research by illuminating social support predictors of positive relationship functioning and resilience from a large national sample of those in same-sex relationships (N = 1,303) who continu...
Article
This study sought to explore HIV-related stereotypes and norms that impact HIV-status communication with potential sexual partners. A series of focus groups and in-depth interviews were conducted (N = 59) with HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM (75%) and Heterosexuals (25%). Findings indicate that HIV stereotypes and stigma remain as barriers to HIV...
Article
An intervention was conducted providing access to clinic-verified HIV test results via a secure, web-based informatics platform to facilitate sexual partner HIV-status communication. Participants (N = 28) were men who have sex with men (MSM; HIV- n = 8, HIV+ n = 8) and heterosexuals (Non-MSM, n = 12). Focus groups with same-group members explored i...
Article
Introduction: The purpose of this study was to explore the communication behaviors demonstrated by parents of children with chronic conditions and provider team members when communicating about the child's care in outpatient clinics using concepts from the Theory of Shared Communication (TSC). Methods: This was a secondary data analysis of 30 pr...
Article
People frequently use the internet to obtain information, including information about health, but we lack understanding of how people living with HIV (PLHIV) use the internet in their care and treatment decisions. In this secondary analysis, interviews with 23 individuals who initiated HIV care at an urban, Midwestern medical center and mentioned i...
Article
Full-text available
The pro-anorexia movement provides support for those with anorexia and adopts an ‘anti-recovery’ view of the disease.The internet has allowed pro-anorexia followers (proanas) to exchange messages in anonymous virtual communities where they encourage one another to be thin. Through the analysis of pro-ana websites using grounded theory, four themes...
Article
Full-text available
Uncertainty is an important part of the illness experience. Mishel elaborated a theory of uncertainty in acute illness and later expanded the framework to account for uncertainty in chronic illness. Researchers subsequently have investigated the causes and outcomes associated with the uncertainty in illness experience across a variety of medical co...
Article
Full-text available
In a study of AIDS activism and communication patterns between people with HIV or AIDS and health care personnel, parallel persuasive processes are described between social or political activism and personal self-advocacy. The analysis of public and private discourse leads to 3 interrelated conclusions about AIDS activist behaviours at the collecti...
Article
Full-text available
This study is follow-up to Haas and Stafford's (1998) initial exploration of communi-cative relationship maintenance behaviors in gay and lesbian relationships. This in-vestigation is an attempt to explore relationship maintenance behaviors of ongoing, same-sex relationships through direct comparison with those used in heterosexual marriages. Using...
Chapter
Full-text available
2003). In D. Canary & M. Dainton (Eds.), Maintaining Relationships through Communication: Relational, Contextual, and Cultural Variations. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Earlbaum. Stephen M. Haas (Ph.D., Ohio State University) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Cincinnati. His research is in the areas of rela...
Article
Full-text available
Activist organizations are a relatively unique collective setting for people living with an HIV infection or AIDS. Communi- cation within these organizations includes educational and motivational practices designed to facilitate change for the group and for its individual members. In this study, we exam- ined differences between activist and nonact...
Article
Full-text available
This study reports the revival experiences of persons who once were reconciled to their death from HIV/AIDS but who, as a result of dramatic treatment responses, now believe they may survive (popularly known as the Lazarus Syndrome). A purposive sample of men and women living with HIV infection or AIDS were interviewed in six focus groups. As part...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the fact that many individuals express a desire for more information and involvement in the health care process, it remains to be seen if they have adopted a more participative approach by becoming involved in decisions made about their health. Research indicates that, in actual practice, individuals are differentially willing or able to be...
Article
Full-text available
The present study is an initial examination of the relationship maintenance behaviors used by gay male and lesbian couples to sustain their relationship. The study replicates the open-ended survey approach used by Dainton & Stafford (1993) to explore the maintenance behaviors of heterosexual couples. In general, gay and lesbian partners were found...
Article
Full-text available
Uncertainty is a chronic and pervasive source of psychological distress for persons living with HIV. Numerous sources of heightened uncertainty, including complex changing treatments, ambiguous symptom patterns, and fears of ostracizing social response, play a critical role in the experience of HIV-positive persons and are linked with negative perc...
Article
Dissertation. (Ph. D.)--Ohio State University, 1999. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 183-207). Photocopy.

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