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Stephen E. Barton

Stephen E. Barton

Ph.D. City & Regional Planning

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36
Publications
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243
Citations

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
Neighborhood organization leaders in San Francisco generally have one of two sets of civic beliefs about the neighborhood residents, one that gives primacy to property ownership or another that gives primacy to citizenship. Both groups are concerned that reform proposals that create greater community control over major resources will lead to politi...
Article
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Nearly forty years ago, the City of Berkeley’s progressive activists and elected officials began an effort to use city government to develop democratic, community-controlled housing that would not be subject to the market and would assist in building a movement for social justice. Although progressives gained long-term control of the city governmen...
Article
In the San Francisco Bay Area, where residential rent is among the highest in the United States, an analysis of data from several sources demonstrates that high rent cannot be accounted for by higher quality, higher operating costs, or higher construction costs. At least one-third of the total rent paid is land rent. Despite increases in real incom...
Article
J. Stitt Wilson (1868–1942) was a leading American Christian Socialist. When he was elected Mayor of the City of Berkeley in 1911 he had to shift focus from the broad moral and economic case for socialism to the specifics of municipal reform. He drew on the ideas of Henry George, feminist urban reformers in the Woman's Christian Temperance Union an...
Article
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In this paper we argue that behind widely accepted problem definitions are myths, stories which draw on tradition and taken for granted knowledge. These myths, which may or may not be true in a factual sense, are important to the definition of problems because they link public issues to widely accepted ways of understanding the world and to shared...
Presentation
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A well-designed moderate rent stabilization program increases tenant and community stability and reduces displacement by providing renters with stable and predictable rents in areas suffering unreasonable rent increases. In these areas, where a shortage of housing has given landlords an unfair advantage in bargaining power, rent stabilization and e...
Article
J. Stitt Wilson, mayor of Berkeley from 1911 to 1913, supported women's suffrage because he believed it would lead to a revaluation of the feminine and maternal values of cooperation and care and, along with the labor movement, provide the basis for creation of a socialist society that would embody the true values of Christianity. A rare example of...
Article
Full-text available
Inclusionary zoning, commonly known as inclusionary housing (IH), first originated in the United States in the early‐1970s in the wealthy suburbs of Washington, DC. Since then, the epicenter of IH practice in the U.S. has moved west to California. Today, more than 25 % (145) of the state’s local governments have adopted inclusionary policies. These...
Article
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Walter Rybeck makes the case for land value taxation, explains how he came to understand its importance and describes his involvement in the Henry George movement in the United States over the last 50 years. While the book demonstrates the virtues of land value taxation, it also illustrates some of the limitations of contemporary Georgism.
Article
Full-text available
The history of housing policy in Berkeley over the past thirty-five years provides a case study in the limits that State government can place on local government efforts to increase social equity. In 1976 a group of visionary planners and activists wrote The Cities’ Wealth: Programs for Community Economic Control in Berkeley, California. Berkeley’s...
Article
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Explores the potential value and risks of efforts at labor-management cooperation in the public sector based on experiences in the City of Berkeley, California during the 1990s. Argues for the importance of empowerment of employees as union members.
Article
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Analysis of the policy choice between social housing and housing allowances has been obscured by the older housing policy debate between proponents of supply subsidies and proponents of demand subsidies. Social housing uses capital grants both to reduce monthly housing costs to below-market rates and to take existing or newly constructed housing ou...
Article
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Examines mandatory homeowners associations created through common property ownership in condominium and planned developments in the United States. Reviews the contradictions that arise from trying to carry out collective governance of neighborhood property and its associated rules using the cultural understandings associated with individual private...
Article
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Over the past 20 years, there has been an important change in the structure of home ownership. For millions of Americans, home ownership is now accompanied by mandatory membership in a home owners’ association and by shared ownership of private property in a common-interest development (ClD), which includes condominiums, planned developments, and c...
Article
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Thesis (Ph. D. in City and Regional Planning)--University of California, Berkeley, Dec. 1985. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 167-190).
Article
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In recent years two broad approaches to public policy have emerged which offer solutions for the problems of government, one based on the market and the other based on conflict resolution This paper argues that both policy approaches are plagued by problems caused by inequality and coercion Part I reviews the normative bases of the market, includin...
Article
Full-text available
Rental housing is both a market commodity and an investment of capital. Under conditions of income inequality, extensive poverty, and residen tial segregation based on income, housing deterioration is a natural and even pro fitable consequence of the rental housing market. Changes in the relative posi tion of housing within the market cause buildin...

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Projects (5)
Project
Explain the social purposes and underlying economics of rent regulation; explain where rent regulation fits into broader efforts to provide stability and affordable housing to lower-income tenants.