Stephanie Wright

Stephanie Wright
King's College London | KCL · MRC-HPA Centre for Environment and Health

Marine Biology BSc

About

14
Publications
67,600
Reads
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5,406
Citations
Introduction
I am an early career research fellow investigating the potential for microscopic plastic litter to impact human health.
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - present
King's College London
Position
  • MRC Early Career Research Fellow
Description
  • The potential for dietary micro- and nanoplastics to impact human health.
June 2011 - May 2015
University of Exeter
Position
  • PhD
Description
  • Research focused on the potential for microplastics to cause harm in the marine environment, specifically in sediment-dwelling marine worms.
September 2007 - June 2010
Newcastle University
Position
  • Student
Description
  • BSc Marine Biology

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
The discovery of atmospheric micro(nano)plastic transport and ocean–atmosphere exchange points to a highly complex marine plastic cycle, with negative implications for human and ecosystem health. Yet, observations are currently limited. In this Perspective, we quantify the processes and fluxes of the marine-atmospheric micro(nano)plastic cycle, wit...
Article
Microplastics have been observed in indoor and outdoor air. This raises concern for human exposure, especially should they occur in small enough sizes, which if inhaled, reach the central airway and distal lung. As yet, methods for their detection have not spectroscopically verified the chemical composition of microplastics in this size-range. One...
Article
Full-text available
Microplastic debris is ubiquitous and yet sampling, classifying and enumerating this prolific pollutant in marine waters has proven challenging. Typically, waterborne microplastic sampling is undertaken using nets with a 333 μm mesh, which cannot account for smaller debris. In this study, we provide an estimate of the extent to which microplastic c...
Chapter
Microscopic plastic particles – microplastics – are a global issue for aquatic habitats. Recently, they have been reported in indoor and outdoor air raising concern for public health due to the potential for exposure via inhalation. However, very little is known about airborne microplastics, including their spatial and temporal concentrations; chem...
Article
Microplastics have been increasingly documented in freshwater ecosystems in recent years, and growing concerns have been raised about their potential environmental health risks. To assess the current state of knowledge, with a focus on the UK, a literature review of existing freshwater microplastics studies was conducted. Sampling and analytical me...
Article
Microplastics are ubiquitous contaminants, with preliminary evidence indicating they are a novel component of air pollution. This presents a plausible inhalation exposure pathway, should microplastics occur in the inhalable size range; however, this remains an analytical challenge. Here, we develop a filter-based sampling method compatible with bot...
Article
The annual production of plastic textile fibers has increased by more than 6% per year, reaching 60 million metric tons, about 16% of world plastic production. The degradation of these fibers produces fibrous microplastics (MPs). Such MPs have been observed in atmospheric fallouts, as well as in indoor and outdoor environments. Some fibrous MPs may...
Article
Full-text available
Microplastics are a pollutant of environmental concern. Their presence in food destined for human consumption and in air samples has been reported. Thus, microplastic exposure via diet or inhalation could occur, the human health effects of which are unknown. The current review article draws upon cross-disciplinary scientific literature to discuss a...
Article
Full-text available
Marine debris is a global environmental issue. Smoked cigarette filters are the predominant coastal litter item; 4.5 trillion are littered annually, presenting a source of bioplastic microfibres (cellulose acetate) and harmful toxicants to marine environments. Despite the human health risks associated with smoking, little is known of the hazards ci...
Article
The indiscriminate disposal of plastic to the environment is of concern. Microscopic plastic litter (<5 mm diameter; 'microplastic') is increasing in abundance in the marine environment, originating from the fragmentation of plastic items and from industry and personal-care products [1]. On highly impacted beaches, microplastic concentrations (<1mm...
Article
Full-text available
The sperm of most barnacle species show negligible motility unless exposed to oviducal gland fluid; a secretion associated with oviposition. Artificial activation has previously been induced in Semibalanus balanoides by elevating seawater pH using an ammonia buffer. To date, the information pertaining to barnacle sperm biology is rather limited. Cu...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Archived project
To assess whether microplastics cause harm to a marine worm, and determine what that 'harm' might be.
Project
We are assessing whether microplastics contaminate the atmospheric environment, and therefore whether inhalation is a potential exposure pathway. To do this, we are developing methods to differentiate and quantify aerosolised micro/nano-plastics. We will perform laboratory cell culture assays to assess the potential for cellular interaction, uptake and toxicity, indicating the potential human health risks. In parrallel, we are developing methods to screen human tissue samples, to determine whether uptake and distribution does occur.