Stephanie B Richman

Stephanie B Richman
Baldwin Wallace University · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

10
Publications
5,162
Reads
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309
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - present
Westminster College
Position
  • Professor
August 2012 - May 2014
Eastern Kentucky University
Position
  • Part-Time Instructor
August 2011 - May 2014
University of Kentucky
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Past research has established that loneliness is associated with both self-concept confusion and depression. The present work ties these disparate lines of research together by demonstrating that self-concept confusion mediates the relationship between loneliness and depression. Three studies, one cross-sectional and two longitudinal, supported thi...
Article
Avoidantly, compared to securely, attached people help less often and perceive the costs of helping as more severe. Helping relates to empathy and closeness, which may cause avoidantly attached people discomfort. We tested the hypothesis that reducing the potential for emotional closeness for avoidantly attached people would offset their unhelpfuln...
Article
People have a fundamental need to belong that, when thwarted, can affect cognition and behavior in ways designed to regain social connection. Because one of the best predictors of social connection is similarity, the current investigation tests the self-malleability hypothesis, which predicts social exclusion encourages people to modify their self-...
Article
Full-text available
To forgive someone is to forsake vengeance. however, vengeful behavior could also be decreased by motivational states that promote avoiding aggression. Dis-gust sensitivity is one such state; elevated levels of disgust sensitivity are associ-ated with less aggression. heightened disgust sensitivity may therefore relate to low levels of vengeance. u...
Article
Full-text available
The current investigation examined the interactive effect of dysfunctional dating attitudes and religiosity on substance use in a large sample of youth (N = 1,357) from the YouthStyles survey. Based on past research, we explored the possibility that religiosity buffered the association between dysfunctional dating attitudes and substance use. Becau...
Chapter
Full-text available
In DeWall and colleagues’ (2011) study, participants completed daily diary measures of selfesteem and negative emotion for a three-week assessment period. After the diary portion of the study, participants completed the virtual ball-tossing game (i.e., the Cyberball paradigm) with two ostensible partners while in an fMRI scanner (first scan = inclu...
Article
Full-text available
Social rejection often increases aggression, but the neural mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. This experiment tested whether neural activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and anterior insula in response to social rejection predicted greater subsequent aggression. Additionally, it tested whether executive functioning...
Article
Social and physical pain share common overlap at linguistic, behavioral, and neural levels. Prior research has shown that acetaminophen-an analgesic medication that acts indirectly through cannabinoid 1 receptors-reduces the social pain associated with exclusion. Yet, no work has examined if other drugs that act on similar receptors, such as mariju...
Article
Full-text available
A growing body of work demonstrates that the brain responds similarly to physical and social injury. Both experiences are associated with activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and anterior insula. This dual functionality of the dACC and anterior insula underscores the evolutionary importance of maintaining interpersonal bonds. Des...
Article
People have a fundamental need to belong that, when satisfied, is linked to a variety of indicators of well-being. The current article discusses what happens when social relationships go awry, namely through social exclusion. It seeks to resolve discrepancies in the literature by proposing that responses to social exclusion depend primarily on the...

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