Stephanie Alice Payne

Stephanie Alice Payne
University of Cambridge | Cam · Division of Biological Anthropology

PhD Candidate in Biological Anthropology

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5
Publications
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36
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Introduction
Stephanie is a PhD candidate at the University of Cambridge, and a National Geographic Young Explorer. She specialises in the study of human hands and their role in thermoregulation. Her research utilises a range of methods including infrared imaging, 3D scanning techniques, bioimpedance analysis, and cold pressor testing. Her work seeks to determine the applicability of cold adaptation theory to human hands.

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
The multi-stress environment of high altitude has been associated with growth deficits in humans, particularly in zeugopod elements (forearm and lower leg). This is consistent with the thrifty phenotype hypothesis, which has been observed in Andeans, but has yet to be tested in other high-altitude populations. In Himalayan populations, other factor...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives The current study investigated whether size and proportions of the hands and digits affect dexterity during severe cold exposure. As wide hands are known to lose less heat than narrow hands, and narrow digits are associated with greater dexterity, this study aimed to test whether there was a direct trade‐off between dexterity and thermor...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives The current study assessed whether ecogeographical patterns seen in hand proportions correlate with heat loss directly. Using a brief severe cold immersion experiment on the hand, the influence of hand and digit dimensions on heat loss was evaluated. Materials and methods A sample of 113 living individuals were tested. Two‐dimensional a...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: This study investigated the influence of body size and composition on maintaining hand temperature during severe cold exposure. The hand's high surface area-to-volume ratio predisposes the hand to heat loss, increasing the risk of cold injury and even hypothermia, which are major selective pressures in cold environments. While vasoregu...

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