Stephanie Orme

Stephanie Orme
Emmanuel College · Department of Communication and Media Studies

Ph.D. in Mass Communications, M.A. in Communication, B.S. in Communication,

About

12
Publications
9,312
Reads
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137
Citations
Introduction
Dr. Stephanie Orme is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication and Media Studies at Emmanuel College in Boston, Massachusetts. Her research examines the global digital gaming industry’s and gaming culture as they intersect with gender, race, sexuality, class, and disability. She is interested in topics such as "gamer" identity, digital labor, streaming, and esports.
Additional affiliations
May 2020 - May 2020
Emmanuel College
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
December 2018 - December 2019
Curry College
Position
  • Instructor
August 2017 - May 2018
Suffolk University
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • CJN101: Introduction to Communication CJN103: Principles of Oral Communication
Education
August 2014 - May 2018
Pennsylvania State University
Field of study
  • Mass Communications
September 2010 - December 2011
Suffolk University
Field of study
  • Communication (Comm Studies)
August 2006 - May 2010
Illinois State University
Field of study
  • Communication (Broadcast Journalism, Comm Studies)

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Media portrayals of comic book fandom routinely depict the comics community as a masculine space, one in which the female fan is an anomaly. Yet, women reportedly represent a growing number of comic book purchasers and convention attendees. If women are, in fact, such a large contingent of the comic book fan community, then why do these gendered st...
Article
This study seeks to analyze the relationships between content features, video attributes, and parasocial attributes – the characteristics that could lead to the creation of parasocial relationships—among the top most subscribed YouTube channels. A quantitative content analysis was utilized in order to explore the videos of the most popular YouTube...
Article
Full-text available
This study explores the phenomenon of video game spectatorship from the perspective of a population I refer to as “just watchers.” Previous studies have tended to focus on game spectatorship from turn-taking “non-players” or live-streaming audiences, specifically. “Just watchers” are individuals who express no desire to play video games themselves,...
Preprint
Full-text available
This study investigates how video games culture addresses mental health and illness. Through a discourse analysis of eighty-three articles from four popular video games news websites, this paper describes the primary conceptions of mental health and illness as created in games culture. The study also targets how the news articles address the notion...
Article
Full-text available
Aims: The aim of the paper is to explore emerging themes, which support the development of a sustainable esports industry. Methods and results: This study is based on a workshop methodology, which aims to identify and explore topics perceived as most pertinent by individuals with an intimate understanding of the dynamics of the esports context. Tw...
Conference Paper
This study investigates how video games culture addresses mental health and illness. Through a discourse analysis of eighty-three articles from four popular video games news websites, this paper describes the primary conceptions of mental health and illness as created in games culture. The study also targets how the news articles address the...
Chapter
In this chapter, I argue that the discourse of ECMGM is built on a post-feminist/post-racial understanding of the video game industry, one that fails to acknowledge institutionalized sexism and racism. Drawing on published reports and experiences of industry workers, I discuss the promise and peril of “Everyone can make games,” highlighting the way...
Chapter
The starting point of this chapter is long length graphic novel adaptations of movies, including Star Wars and Alien, but the analysis will cover both mainstream and independent adaptations. Superhero comic adaptation has been the mainstay of the cinema in this period. In its slipstream it is also the case that smaller, more intimate and independen...
Thesis
This dissertation explores possible explanations and complexities surrounding women’s relationship with leisure and video games. One of my objectives with this study is to understand how women players view their relationship with gaming: how they become involved with video games, how gaming fits into their adult lives (specifically, as wives, mothe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Released in October 2013, Papers, Please is an independently-produced game in which players are a (male) immigration officer working at the border checkpoint in the fictional, Soviet-esque country Arstotzka in the year 1989. Gameplay is centered on checking and verifying immigration documents of the NPCs who wish to enter Arstotzka. With only each...
Chapter
Advertising agencies are at the heart of the advertising industry, employing nearly 200,000 people in the US (Johnson, 2015) and coordinating key marketing activities: creative work, media planning and buying, research, and integrated marketing. But are all agencies the same? In fact, the list of top US agencies in 2014 (Advertising Age, 2015b) sho...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
An economic analysis of over a million videos from Twitch and YouTube, with metadata, and sales figures from the top 10,000 best-selling games of all time testing. Using a difference-in-differences estimator, we calculate the degree to which sales appear to be influenced by the popularity of game streaming.
Archived project
For this dissertation, I will explore possible explanations and complexities for what seems to be an increase in video game play as females enter adulthood, and how women players understand both the reasons they play games, and the reasons that they and/or their peers were not gamers as early as the typical male gamer. Such complexities may include not simply the psychological or social gratifications that adult women gain from play, but also could raise larger socio-cultural and structural constraints such as media representation of “typical” players, social (dis)approval, changing norms, and access to games and players. Combining survey data with in-depth, semi-structured interviews, I hope to construct a more complete or at least complicating narrative of women’s experiences with digital games throughout the course of their lives to explore explanations for the gender/age gap in gaming culture and what this may mean for understanding the different ways that gender and age intersect with video games.