Stephanie J Green

Stephanie J Green
University of Alberta | UAlberta · Department of Biological Sciences

PhD

About

70
Publications
29,253
Reads
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2,816
Citations
Citations since 2016
29 Research Items
2082 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
Additional affiliations
July 2018 - present
University of Alberta
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
July 2016 - July 2018
Stanford University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2013 - May 2016
Oregon State University
Position
  • David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellow

Publications

Publications (70)
Article
Full-text available
Major invasions of Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans and P. miles) are underway in the Western Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. While the establishment of lionfish in the Western Atlantic is perhaps the most well-studied marine fish invasion to date, the rapidly expanding invasion in the Mediterranean is more recent and has received...
Article
Full-text available
Trait-based approaches are increasingly recognized as a tool for understanding ecosystem re-assembly and function under intensifying global change. Here we synthesize trait-based research globally (n = 865 studies) to examine the contexts in which traits may be used for global change prediction. We find that exponential growth in the field over the...
Article
Full-text available
Managing invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans and P. miles) in the Western Atlantic Ocean is beyond the capacity of natural resource organizations alone. In response, organizations have mobilized members of the public and citizen scientists to help. We used a structured survey to assess the activities and perceptions of 71 organizations...
Article
Full-text available
The rate of human-induced environmental change continues to accelerate, stimulating the need for rapid and science-based decision making. The recent availability of cyberinfrastructure, open-source data and novel techniques has increased opportunities to use ecological forecasts to predict environmental change. But to effectively inform environment...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal habitats have experienced significant degradation and fragmentation in recent decades under the strain of interacting ecosystem stressors. To maintain biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, coastal managers and restoration practitioners face the urgent tasks of identifying priority areas for protection and developing innovative, scalable a...
Article
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Designing effective local management for invasive species poses a major challenge for conservation, yet factors affecting intervention success and efficiency are rarely evaluated and incorporated into practice. We coordinated regional efforts by divers to cull invasive lionfish (Pterois spp.) on 33 U.S. Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean prote...
Article
Full-text available
Predation from the invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish is likely to amplify declines in marine fishes observed in multiple ocean basins. As the invasion intensifies and expands, there is an urgent need to identify species that are most at risk for extirpation - and possible extinction - from this added threat. To address this gap and inform conservation...
Article
Full-text available
A quarter of global oil production comes from offshore fields and about 60% of internationally-traded oil travels by tankers. The relationship between oil, fisheries, and coastal communities is documented primarily through case studies in individual jurisdictions and via the impacts of oil spills. Yet, the implications of oil development for fisher...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes a non-traditional fisheries management concept and an indicator-based framework to encourage and guide management of invasive lionfish (Pterois spp.) fisheries in the temperate and tropical western Atlantic. We introduce the concept of optimum lionfish yield (OLY)—an extension of the concept of ecologically sustainable yield—wh...
Article
Full-text available
As the impacts of climate change on human society accelerate, coastal communities are vulnerable to changing environmental conditions. The capacity of communities and households to respond to these changes (i.e., their adaptive capacity) will determine the impacts of climate and co-occurring stressors. To date, empirical evidence linking theoretica...
Article
Full-text available
We explored patterns, rates, and unexpected socio‐ecological consequences of tooth replacement in serrasalmids and characids of the Peruvian Amazon using microCT. Of 24 specimens collected in February 2019—representing a mix of red‐bellied piranha Pygocentrus nattereri, redeye piranha Serrasalmus rhombeus, silver dollar fish Ctenobrycon hauxwellian...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species continue to drive major losses in biodiversity and ecosystem function across the globe. Dealing with the effects of invasion is particularly problematic in marine and freshwater habitats, because the pace at which invaders establish often greatly outstrips the resources available for their eradication. While most managers in North...
Preprint
Full-text available
Pre-print available to read here: https://www.authorea.com/users/346990/articles/472799-trait-based-approaches-to-global-change-ecology-from-description-to-prediction
Article
Full-text available
Many successful invasive species have generalist diets, but the extent to which they can track changing resources has seldom been documented. Stable isotope analysis was used to measure dietary shifts with ontogeny and over time in relation to changes in prey availability for Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois sp.). These are invasive predators that ar...
Article
Full-text available
As the geographic ranges of species are increasingly altered by forces such as biological invasion and climate change, when and where will strong biotic interactions arise within reassembling communities? Prey selectivity data are often of limited use for predicting future consumptive interactions because they are specific to the identity and relat...
Article
Full-text available
Science helps us identify problems, understand their extent, and begin to find solutions; it helps us understand future directions for our society. Scientists bear witness to scenes of change and discovery that most people will never experience. Yet the vividness of these experiences is often left out when scientists talk and write about their work...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hackerott et al. (2017) report that Indo-Pacific lionfish “had no apparent effect on native prey communities” (p. 9) on continuous reef-sites of the Belizean Barrier Reef (BBR). Based on a lack of observational evidence, they challenge existing evidence for the effects of predation by lionfish on native prey community structure and assert that prev...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hackerott et al. (2017) report that Indo-Pacific lionfish “had no apparent effect on native prey communities” (p. 9) on continuous reef-sites of the Belizean Barrier Reef (BBR). Based on a lack of observational evidence, they challenge existing evidence for the effects of predation by lionfish on native prey community structure and assert that prev...
Article
Full-text available
Species invasions often occur at geographic scales that preclude complete eradication, setting up long term battles for population control. To understand the extent to which exotic species removal by volunteers can contribute to local invasion suppression and alleviate invasion effects, we studied the activities of volunteers culling invasive lionf...
Article
Full-text available
Culling can be an effective management tool for reducing populations of invasive species to levels that minimize ecological effects. However, culling is labour-intensive, costly, and may have unintended ecological consequences. In the Caribbean, culling is widely used to control invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish, Pterois volitans and P. miles, but the...
Article
Full-text available
Low diversity among scientists and practitioners is rampant in conservation. Currently, conservation professionals do not reflect the same diversity of perspectives and experiences of the world as the communities who bear the largest burden for implementing—or adverse consequences for failing to implement—conservation action. Acknowledging and desc...
Article
Full-text available
The environmental consequences of bitumen extraction from oil sands deposits are at the center of North American natural resource and energy policy debate, yet impacts on ocean environments have received little attention. Using a quantitative framework, we identify knowledge gaps and research needs related to the effects of oil sands development on...
Article
Full-text available
Indo-Pacific lionfish Pterois volitans/miles were likely introduced to Florida coastal waters via the aquarium trade and have spread rapidly along the southeastern coast of the United States and throughout the greater Caribbean region, including Bermuda and the Gulf of Mexico. This mesopredator has strong consumptive effects on native demersal fish...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The majority of invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) control has been through traditional diver-based removals. This strategy has been successful at reducing densities and, therefore, minimizing impacts at local scales (specific reefs). However, due to diving constraints, such as costs, limited bottom-time, and operable depths, this approach...
Article
Full-text available
The goal of our paper is to characterize challenges and offer potential solutions for structuring collaborative research that benefits conservation, based on our collective experience as foreign and local scientists conducting collaborative research in small island states. Specifically, we draw upon presentations by the authors and discussions amon...
Article
Nearly 70 years after North American conservationist Aldo Leopold reflected on his own struggle with the relationship between humans and wildlife in ‘A Sand County Almanac’, conservation scientists are still wrestling with the extent to which their research aims to protect and restore ecosystems for ‘nature's sake’ (i.e. intrinsic value), or for ‘h...
Article
Full-text available
Information on fish movement and growth is primarily obtained through the marking and tracking of individuals with external tags, which are usually affixed to anesthetized individuals at the surface. However, the quantity and quality of data obtained by this method is often limited by small sample sizes owing to the time associated with the tagging...
Data
Collecting and handling fish specimens in preparation for in situ tagging.
Data
Applying external (visual) tags in situ.
Article
Species invasions have a range of negative effects on recipient ecosystems, and many occur at a scale and magnitude that preclude complete eradication. When complete extirpation is unlikely with available management resources, an effective strategy may be to suppress invasive populations below levels predicted to cause undesirable ecological change...
Preprint
Full-text available
Indo-Pacific lionfish have invaded large parts of the western Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, and have already caused measurable declines in native Atlantic reef fauna. Culling efforts are occurring across the region, particularly on coral reefs, to reduce local lionfish abundances. Frequent culling has recently been shown to cause a shift...
Preprint
Indo-Pacific lionfish have invaded large parts of the western Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, and have already caused measurable declines in native Atlantic reef fauna. Culling efforts are occurring across the region, particularly on coral reefs, to reduce local lionfish abundances. Frequent culling has recently been shown to cause a shift...
Article
Full-text available
1.Understanding how predators select their prey can provide important insights into community structure and dynamics. However, the suite of prey species available to a predator is often spatially and temporally variable. As a result, species-specific selectivity data are of limited use for predicting novel predator-prey interactions because they ar...
Article
Full-text available
Biotic resistance is the idea that native species negatively affect the invasion success of introduced species, but whether this can occur at large spatial scales is poorly understood. Here we re-evaluated the hypothesis that native large-bodied grouper and other predators are controlling the abundance of exotic lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) on...
Article
Full-text available
As a result of being hunted, animals often alter their behaviour in ways that make future encounters with predators less likely. When hunting is carried out for conservation, for example to control invasive species, these behavioural changes can inadvertently impede the success of future efforts. We examined the effects of repeated culling by spear...
Preprint
Biotic resistance is the idea that native species negatively affect the invasion success of introduced species, but whether this can occur at large spatial scales is poorly understood. Here we re-evaluated the hypothesis that native large-bodied grouper and other predators are controlling the abundance of exotic lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) on...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biotic resistance is the idea that native species negatively affect the invasion success of introduced species, but whether this can occur at large spatial scales is poorly understood. Here we re-evaluated the hypothesis that native large-bodied grouper and other predators are controlling the abundance of exotic lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) on...
Article
Full-text available
The invasion of western Atlantic marine habitats by two predatory Indo-Pacific lionfish, Pterois volitans and P. miles, has recently unfolded at an unprecedented rate, with ecological consequences anticipated to be largely negative. We take stock of recently accumulated knowledge about lionfish ecology and behaviour and examine how this information...
Article
Full-text available
Biotic resistance, the process by which new colonists are excluded from a community by predation from and/or competition with resident species, can prevent or limit species invasions. We examined whether biotic resistance by native predators on Caribbean coral reefs has influenced the invasion success of red lionfishes (Pterois volitans and Pterois...
Data
Spline correlograms, with 95% point wise bootstrap confidence intervals, of the Pearson residuals for each generalized liner mixed effects logistic regression model including all the explanatory variables fitted to the data. (TIFF)
Data
Relationship between lionfish density and biomass estimates. Each point represents a transect mean. The Pearson’s product-moment correlation between lionfish biomass and lionfish density was 0.95, p<0.01. (TIFF)
Data
Total predator biomass on protected and unprotected Caribbean reefs. The biomass of native predatory fishes on 17 protected sites (no-take marine reserves) and on 55 unprotected or non-reserve reefs. Average predator biomass was significantly higher at sites inside marine reserves (135.4 g/m2) than in non-reserve sites (37.7 g/m2); t = −4.5933, p =...
Data
Survey locations across the Caribbean Study sites, site codes, regions, and protection level. Habitat type, S&G: Spur and Grove; Patch: Patch Reef. Protection level, NTZ: No-take zone; MPA: marine protected area; GUA: general used area. Permit, Yes: Permit Obtained (Permits for The Bahamas, Belize, and Mexico covered all sites); Not Req.: Permit wa...
Data
Field survey permit information. (DOCX)
Data
Reef fish predator species used in the study. Taxonomic information, food guild and trophic groups of the predator species used in the analysis. Guild and trophic information was obtained from Fish-Base [16]. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Conservation successes can and do happen, however, the process by which society achieves them remains unclear. Using a novel culturomics approach, we analyse word usage within digitized texts to assess the chronological order in which scientists, the public, and policymakers engage in the conservation process for three prominent conservation issues...
Article
Full-text available
Indo-Pacific lionfish Pterois spp. have recently invaded marine habitats throughout the western Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea. Their unusual hunting behaviour suggests that they could prey on most fish species within their gape size limits. However, few prey species have been identified so far due to the challenges of identifying part...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Indo-Pacific red lionfish (Pterois volitans and P. miles) have rapidly invaded the Western Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, producing a marine predator invasion of unparalleled speed and magnitude. Quantifying and mitigating the effects of predation by lionfish on invaded fish communities are now top priorities f...
Article
Full-text available
A standard approach to improving the accuracy of reef fish population estimates derived from underwater visual censuses (UVCs) is the application of species-specific correction factors, which assumes that a species’ detectability is constant under all conditions. To test this assumption, we quantified detection rates for invasive Indo-Pacific lionf...
Article
Full-text available
Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans and P. miles) have spread swiftly across the Western Atlantic, producing a marine predator invasion of unparalleled speed and magnitude. There is growing concern that lionfish will affect the structure and function of invaded marine ecosystems, however detrimental impacts on natural communities have yet to be...
Data
Species and size classes included in each of the four categories considered in the analysis of biomass change between 2008 and 2010 on nine coral reefs off southwest New Providence, Bahamas. Fishes of <13 cm were deemed to be potential prey based on the maximum prey size observed in lionfish stomachs at these sites. Functional group was determined...
Article
Full-text available
Species invasions threaten marine biodiversity globally. There is a concern that climate change is exacerbating this problem. Here, we examined some of the potential effects of warming water temperatures on the invasion of Western Atlantic habitats by a marine predator, the Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans and P. miles). We focussed on two t...
Article
Full-text available
The invasion by Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans and P. miles) of the western Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico is emerging as a major threat to coral reef communities across the region. Comparing native and introduced populations of invasive species can reveal shifts in ecology and behaviour that can accompany successful invasions. Usi...
Article
Full-text available
Predicting and mitigating the effects of invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish Pterois volitans on Caribbean fish communities requires a thorough understanding of the species' predation behaviour in the invaded range, including the types and amounts of prey consumed and how foraging patterns vary in relation to extrinsic conditions. We studied the activit...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Indo-Pacific lionfishes, Pterois miles and P. volitans, are now established along the U.S. southeast coast, Bermuda, Bahamas, and are becoming established in the Caribbean. While these lionfish are popular in the aquarium trade, their biology and ecology are poorly understood in their native range. Given the rapid establishment and potential ad...
Article
Full-text available
EXTENDED ABSTRACT Species invasions are occurring worldwide at an unprecedented rate, with extreme ecological and economic impacts (Mooney and Cleland 2001, Sala et al. 2000, Vitousek et al. 1997). While the Global Invasive Species Database lists over 660 species of ecological and economic concern, less than 12% of invaders occur in marine ecosyste...

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