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Stephanie J Forkel

Stephanie J Forkel
Donders Institute for Brain Cognition and Behaviour

Professor

About

84
Publications
34,507
Reads
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2,519
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2022 - present
Technische Universität München
Position
  • Global Visiting Professor
December 2019 - May 2022
King's College London
Position
  • Senior Lecturer
August 2017 - December 2019
King's College London
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
September 2009 - December 2013
King's College London
Field of study
  • Clinical Neurimaging

Publications

Publications (84)
Article
Full-text available
Patients with stroke lesions offer a unique window into understanding human brain function. Studying stroke lesions poses several challenges due to the complexity of the lesion anatomy and the mechanisms causing local and remote disruptions on brain networks. In this prospective longitudinal study, we compare standard and advanced approaches to whi...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: To combine Magnetic Resonance Imaging-based cortical morphometry and diffusion white matter tractography to describe the anatomical correlates of repetition deficits in patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA). Methods: The traditional anatomical model of language identifies a network for word repetition that includes Wernicke’s...
Article
Full-text available
Inter-individual differences can inform treatment procedures and—if accounted for—have the potential to significantly improve patient outcomes. However, when studying brain anatomy, these inter-individual variations are commonly unaccounted for, despite reports of differences in gross anatomical features, cross-sectional, and connectional anatomy....
Preprint
Full-text available
In 2016, the University of Bordeaux ran a competition within the local neuroscience community to find a name for its new neuroscience building. The name of Paul Broca, who was born nearby in 1824, was chosen in honour of his origins and his contributions to neuroscience. Recently, however, a debate has been ignited about the appropriateness of this...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cognitive functional neuroimaging has been around for over 30 years and has shed light on the brain areas relevant for reading. However, new methodological developments enable mapping the interaction between functional imaging and the underlying white matter networks. In this study, we used such a novel method, called the disconnectome, to decode t...
Article
Full-text available
Ambiguity surrounds the existence and morphology of the human forniceal commissure. We combine advanced in-vivo tractography, multidirectional ex-vivo fiber dissection, and multiplanar histological analysis to characterize this structure’s anatomy. Across all 178 subjects, in-vivo fiber dissection based on the Human Connectome Project 7 T MRI data...
Preprint
Full-text available
Attention is a core cognitive function that lters and selects behaviourally relevant information in the environment. The cortical mapping of attentional systems identi ed two segregated networks that mediate stimulus-driven and goal-driven processes, the Ventral and the Dorsal Attention Networks (VAN, DAN). Deep brain electrophysiological recording...
Article
Full-text available
In 2016, the University of Bordeaux named its new neuroscience building after Paul Broca. A debate was recently ignited about the appropriateness of this choice, however, given Broca’s endorsement of physiological anthropology. Thomas Boraud and Stephanie Forkel discuss this debate and its implications for neurology today.
Preprint
Cognitive functional neuroimaging has been around for over 30 years and has shed light on the brain areas relevant for reading. However, new methodological developments enable mapping the interaction between functional imaging and the underlying white matter networks. In this study, we used such a novel method, called the disconnectome, to decode t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Anatomical studies investigating the forniceal commissure have mainly been performed in non-human primates. However, ambiguity surrounds the existence, morphology, and functionality of this structure in the human brain. We investigated the morphology of the human forniceal commissure by including advanced in vivo tractography, ex vivo fiber dissect...
Preprint
Full-text available
Over the past two decades, the study of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has revealed the existence of multiple brain areas displaying synchronous functional blood oxygen level-dependent signals (BOLD)-resting-state networks (RSNs). The variation in functional connectivity between the different areas of a resting-state net...
Preprint
Full-text available
Stroke significantly impacts quality of life. However, the long-term cognitive evolution in stroke is poorly predictable at the individual level. There is an urgent need for a better prediction of long-term symptoms based on acute clinical neuroimaging data. Previous works have demonstrated a strong relationship between the location of white matter...
Preprint
Full-text available
Motricity is the most commonly affected ability after a stroke. While many clinical studies attempt to predict motor symptoms at different chronic time points after a stroke, longitudinal acute-to-chronic studies remain scarce. Taking advantage of recent advances in mapping brain disconnections, we predict motor outcomes in 62 patients assessed lon...
Article
Full-text available
Language is a unique trait of the human species, of which the genetic architecture remains largely unknown. Through language disorders studies, many candidate genes were identified. However, such complex and multifactorial trait is unlikely to be driven by only few genes and case-control studies, suffering from a lack of power, struggle to uncover...
Preprint
Full-text available
Motricity is the most commonly affected ability after a stroke. While many clinical studies attempt to predict motor symptoms at different chronic time points after a stroke, longitudinal acute-to-chronic studies remain scarce. Taking advantage of recent advances in mapping brain disconnections, we predict motor outcomes in 62 patients assessed lon...
Preprint
Full-text available
Language is a unique trait of the human species, of which the genetic architecture remains largely unknown. Through language disorders studies, many candidate genes were identified. However, such complex and multifactorial trait is unlikely to be driven by only few genes and case-control studies, suffering from a lack of power, struggle to uncover...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, the field of functional neuroimaging has moved away from a pure localisationist approach of isolated functional brain regions to a more integrated view of these regions within functional networks. However, the methods used to investigate functional networks rely on local signals in grey matter and are limited in identifying anatomi...
Chapter
Full-text available
Lesion symptom mapping has revolutionized our understanding of the functioning of the human brain. Associating damaged voxels in the brain with loss of function has created a map of the brain that identifies critical areas. While these methods have significantly advanced our understanding, recent improvements have identified the need for multivaria...
Chapter
Inter-individual differences can inform treatment procedures and - if accounted for - can improve patient outcomes. However, when studying brain anatomy, these variations are largely unaccounted for. Brain connections are essential to mediate brain functional organization and, when severed, cause functional impairments. Here we reviewed the wealth...
Article
Full-text available
Clinical neuroscience research relying on animal models brought valuable translational insights into the function and pathologies of the human brain. The anatomical, physiological, and behavioural similarities between humans and mammals have prompted researchers to study cerebral mechanisms at different levels to develop and test new treatments. Th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Inter-individual differences can inform treatment procedures and - if accounted for - have the potential to significantly improve patient outcomes. However, when studying brain anatomy, these inter-individual variations are commonly unaccounted for, despite reports of differences in gross anatomical features, cross-sectional and connectional anatom...
Preprint
Full-text available
Brainhack is an innovative meeting format that promotes scientific collaboration and education in an open and inclusive environment. Departing from the formats of typical scientific workshops, these events are based on grassroots projects and training, and foster open and reproducible scientific practices. We describe here the multifaceted, lasting...
Preprint
Full-text available
Clinical neuroscience research relying on animal models has provided us with valuable translational insights into the function and the pathology of the human brain. The anatomical, physiological, and behavioural similarities between humans and animals, especially mammals, have prompted researchers to study their cerebral mechanisms at different lev...
Preprint
Full-text available
In recent years, the field of functional neuroimaging has moved from a pure localisationist approach of isolated functional brain regions to a more integrated view of those regions within functional networks. The methods used to investigate such networks, however, rely on local signals in grey matter and are limited in identifying anatomical circui...
Article
Full-text available
Evolution, as we currently understand it, strikes a delicate balance between animals’ ancestral history and adaptations to their current niche. Similarities between species are generally considered inherited from a common ancestor whereas observed differences are considered as more recent evolution. Hence comparing species can provide insights into...
Preprint
Full-text available
In recent years, the field of functional neuroimaging has moved from a pure localisationist approach of isolated functional brain regions to a more integrated view of those regions within functional networks. The methods used to investigate such networks, however, rely on local signals in grey matter and are limited in identifying anatomical circui...
Preprint
Full-text available
In recent years, the field of functional neuroimaging has moved away from a pure localisationist approach of isolated functional brain regions to a more integrated view of these regions within functional networks. However, the methods used to investigate functional networks rely on local signals in grey matter and are limited in identifying anatomi...
Article
Full-text available
Gradients capture some of the variance of the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) signal. Amongst these, the principal gradient depicts a functional processing hierarchy that spans from sensory-motor cortices to regions of the default-mode network. While the cortex has been well characterised in terms of gradients little is...
Preprint
Full-text available
Evolution, as we currently understand it, strikes a delicate balance between animals' ancestral history and adaptations to their current niche. Similarities between species are generally considered inherited from a common ancestor whereas observed differences are considered more recent occurrences. Hence comparing species can provide insights into...
Preprint
Full-text available
Lesion symptom mapping has revolutionized our understanding of the functioning of the human brain. Associating damaged voxels in the brain with loss of function has created a map of the brain that identifies critical areas. While these methods have significantly advanced our understanding, recent improvements have identified the need for multivaria...
Preprint
Full-text available
Inter-individual differences can inform treatment procedures and - if accounted for - can significantly improve patient outcomes. However, when studying brain anatomy, these inter-individual variations are largely unaccounted for, despite reports of differences in gross anatomical features, cross-sectional and connectional anatomy. Brain connection...
Article
Full-text available
Strong right-hand preference on the population level is a uniquely human feature, although the neural basis for this is still not clearly defined. Recent behavioural and neuroimaging literature suggests that hand preference may be related to the orchestrated function and size of fronto-parietal white matter tracts bilaterally. Lesions to these trac...
Article
Full-text available
Margulies et al. (2016) demonstrated the existence of at least five independent functional connectivity gradients in the human brain. However, it is unclear how these functional gradients might link to anatomy. The dual origin theory proposes that differences in cortical cytoarchitecture originate from two trends of progressive differentiation betw...
Article
Full-text available
This scientific commentary refers to ‘Metabolic lesion-deficit mapping of human cognition’ by Jha etal. (doi:10.1093/brain/awaa032).
Preprint
Full-text available
Margulies et al. (2016) demonstrated the existence of at least five independent functional connectivity gradients in the human brain. However, it is unclear how these functional gradients might link to anatomy. The dual origin theory proposes that differences in cortical cytoarchitecture originate from two trends of progressive differentiation betw...
Preprint
Full-text available
Gradients capture some of the variance of the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) signal. Amongst these, the principal gradient depicts a functional processing hierarchy that spans from sensory-motor cortices to regions of the default-mode network. While the cortex has been well characterised in terms of gradients little is...
Article
Nonhuman primate neuroimaging is on the cusp of a transformation, much in the same way its human counterpart was in 2010, when the Human Connectome Project was launched to accelerate progress. Inspired by an open data-sharing initiative, the global community recently met and, in this article, breaks through obstacles to define its ambitions.
Poster
Full-text available
Study objective and summary result This study aimed to describe the anatomic correlates of word repetition deficits in patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), and it obtained evidence that such deficits result from damage to a pathway that indirectly connects Wernicke and Broca regions. What is known and what this paper adds Word repetitio...
Article
Full-text available
Human behavioral asymmetries are commonly studied in the context of structural cortical and connectional asymmetries. Within this framework, Sreenivasan and Sridharan (1) provide intriguing evidence of a relationship between visual asymmetries and the lateralization of superior colliculi connections-a phylogenetically older mesencephalic structure....
Preprint
Full-text available
Strong right-hand preference on the population level is a uniquely human feature, although the neural basis for this is still not clearly defined. Recent behavioural and neuroimaging literature suggests that hand preference may be related to the orchestrated function and size of fronto-parietal white matter tracts bilaterally. Lesions to these trac...
Article
Full-text available
The frontal lobe is central to distinctive aspects of human cognition and behavior. Some comparative studies link this to a larger frontal cortex and even larger frontal white matter in humans compared with other primates, yet others dispute these findings. The discrepancies between studies could be explained by limitations of the methods used to q...
Chapter
Full-text available
The field of neuroanatomy of language is moving forward at a fast pace. This progression is partially due to the development of diffusion tractography, which has been used to describe white matter connections in the living human brain. For the field of neurolinguistics, this advancement is timely and important for two reasons. First, it allows clin...
Article
The parietal lobe has a unique place in the human brain. Anatomically, it is at the crossroad between the frontal, occipital, and temporal lobes, thus providing a middle ground for multimodal sensory integration. Functionally, it supports higher cognitive functions that are characteristic of the human species, such as mathematical cognition, semant...
Article
Full-text available
A large amount of variability exists across human brains; revealed initially on a small scale by postmortem studies and, more recently, on a larger scale with the advent of neuroimaging. Here we compared structural variability between human and macaque monkey brains using grey and white matter magnetic resonance imaging measures. The monkey brain w...
Article
Full-text available
Following right-hemisphere damage, a specific disorder of motor awareness can occur called anosognosia for hemiplegia, i.e. the denial of motor deficits contralateral to a brain lesion. The study of anosognosia can offer unique insights into the neurocognitive basis of awareness. Typically, however, awareness is assessed as a first person judgement...
Article
Full-text available
Acknowledgements Catani, M., & Jones, D. K. (2005). Perisylvian language networks of the human brain. Annals of neurology, 57(1), 8-16. López-Barroso, D., Catani, M., Ripollés, P., Dell'Acqua, F., Rodríguez-Fornells, A., & de Diego-Balaguer, R. (2013). Word learning is mediated by the left arcuate fasciculus. Proceedings of the National Academy of...
Article
Full-text available
Written communication has facilitated the sharing of information within and across generations. Dyspraxia and writing difficulties are common in children and can severely impede academic progression. Hence understanding the neural basis of written communication is essential to characterise neurodevelopmental disorder and develop treatment. Recent m...
Article
Full-text available
Apraxia of Speech (AOS) is a motor speech disorder characterised by incoordination of the speech musculature (Wertz et al., 1984). AOS typically arises following stroke, often co-occurring with aphasia and dysarthria, making differential diagnosis challenging (Darley et al., 1975). Diadochokinetic (DDK) rate is a principal assessment used to detect...
Preprint
Full-text available
Professor Elizabeth Blackburn was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2009 with her graduate student, Carol Greider, and collaborator Jack Szostak for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase. This discovery has had tremendous implications for cancer and ageing research. Professor Blackb...
Article
Full-text available
The possible role of emotion in anosognosia for hemiplegia (i.e., denial of motor deficits contralateral to a brain lesion), has long been debated between psychodynamic and neurocognitive theories. However, there are only a handful of case studies focussing on this topic, and the precise role of emotion in anosognosia for hemiplegia requires empiri...