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Stephanie D'agata

Stephanie D'agata
French National Institute for Sustainable Developement · UMR Entropie 9220 (IRD-Univ.Réunion-UNC-CNRS-Ifremer)

PhD

About

30
Publications
14,032
Reads
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1,106
Citations
Citations since 2017
16 Research Items
1023 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
Additional affiliations
September 2011 - October 2014
Université de Montpellier
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2009 - September 2011
French National Centre for Scientific Research
Field of study
  • Conservation Biology

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is expected to reinforce undesirable social and ecological feedbacks between ecosystem degradation and poverty. This is particularly true for resource-dependent communities in the developing world such as coral reef fishing communities who will have to adapt to those new environmental conditions and novel ecosystems. It is therefore...
Article
The global decline of coral reefs has led to calls for strategies that reconcile biodiversity conservation and fisheries benefits. Still, considerable gaps in our understanding of the spatial ecology of ecosystem services remain. We combined spatial information on larval dispersal networks and estimates of human pressure to test the importance of c...
Article
Full-text available
Beyond the loss of species richness [1-3], human activities may also deplete the breadth of evolutionary history (phylogenetic diversity) and the diversity of roles (functional diversity) carried out by species within communities, two overlooked components of biodiversity. Both are, however, essential to sustain ecosystem functioning and the associ...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is threatening coral-reef-associated ecosystem services and people’s well-being. Addressing direct and indirect coral reef stressors while developing pathways towards recovery and adaptations could mitigate negative impacts, especially in coastal developing countries.
Article
Marine protected areas (MPAs) are among the most effective management responses to human environmental impacts. However, their capacity to sustain biodiversity and associated ecosystem services under climate change is uncertain. Understanding how climate shifts impact ecosystem functioning and socioeconomic well-being is vital for biodiversity cons...
Article
Full-text available
Context Seagrass meadows act as efficient natural carbon sinks by sequestering atmospheric CO2 and through trapping of allochthonous organic material, thereby preserving organic carbon (Corg) in their sediments. Less understood is the influence of landscape configuration and transformation (land-use change) on carbon sequestration dynamics in coast...
Article
The effectiveness and outcomes of management are expected to improve when people are informed, engaged and influential in governance and management procedures. The social‐ecological and demographic contexts should, however, influence an individual's perceptions and willingness to engage and access appreciable benefits from management. To evaluate h...
Article
Full-text available
Rapid degradation of the world's coral reefs jeopardizes their ecological functioning and ultimately imperils the well-being of the millions of people with reef-dependent livelihoods. Ecosystem accessibility is the main driver of their conditions, with the most accessible ecosystems being most at risk of resource depletion. People's socioeconomic c...
Article
Full-text available
Complex histories of chronic and acute sea surface temperature (SST) stresses are expected to trigger taxon- and location-specific responses that will ultimately lead to novel coral communities. The 2016 El Niño-Southern Oscillation provided an opportunity to examine largescale and recent environmental histories on emerging patterns in 226 coral co...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Predictions for the future of coral reefs are largely based on thermal exposure and poorly account for potential geographic variation in biological sensitivity to thermal stress. Without accounting for complex sensitivity responses, simple climate exposure models and associated predictions may lead to poor estimates of future coral survival and...
Article
Full-text available
A complex landscape for reef management Coral reefs are among the most biodiverse systems in the ocean, and they provide both food and ecological services. They are also highly threatened by climate change and human pressure. Cinner et al. looked at how best to maximize three key components of reef use and health: fish biomass, parrotfish grazing,...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, maritime boundaries on oceans form the basis of governance and management of natural resources, yet the fish, and other marine resources neither conform nor confine to these artificial boundaries. As goods and services from marine life continue to retrogress under the intense human exploitation and changing global environment, resilience...
Article
A R T I C L E I N F O Keywords: commons fisheries management coral reefs transdisciplinary social-ecological systems monitoring and evaluation sustainability A B S T R A C T Multi-scale social-ecological systems (SES) approaches to conservation and commons management are needed to address the complex challenges of the Anthropocene. Although SES app...
Article
Rapid intensification of environmental disturbances has sparked widespread decline and compositional shifts in foundation species in ecosystems worldwide. Now, an emergent challenge is to understand the consequences of shifts and losses in such habitat‐forming species for associated communities and ecosystem processes. Recently, consecutive coral b...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Marine reserves that prohibit fishing are a critical tool for sustaining coral reef ecosystems, yet it remains unclear how human impacts in surrounding areas affect the capacity of marine reserves to deliver key conservation benefits. Our global study found that only marine reserves in areas of low human impact consistently sustained t...
Article
Sustainable fisheries must ultimately reduce poverty while maintaining ecosystem productivity. On coral reefs, managing for ‘concave’ trophic pyramids might be a win–win for people and ecosystems, by providing higher-value fisheries and maintaining important ecological functions.
Article
Additional information for «Unexpected high vulnerability of functions in wilderness areas: evidence from coral reef fishes » concerning the Methods and Results section. The Life History Traits (LHT) categorization is described in details, and additional references using those LHT are given. In addition, details concerning the taxonomic and functio...
Article
Full-text available
High species richness is thought to support the delivery of multiple ecosystem functions and services under changing environments. Yet, some species might performunique functional roles while others are redundant. Thus, the benefits of high species richness in maintaining ecosystem functioning are uncertain if functions have little redundancy, pote...
Article
Full-text available
Ongoing declines in the structure and function of the world's coral reefs require novel approaches to sustain these ecosystems and the millions of people who depend on them. A presently unexplored approach that draws on theory and practice in human health and rural development is to systematically identify and learn from the 'outliers'-places where...
Data
Supplementary Figures 1-9 and Supplementary Tables 1-6
Article
Additional figures and tables to complement «Unexpected high vulnerability of functions in wilderness areas: evidence from coral reef fishes ». This is a set of figures first to complement the Methods such as the accumulation curves of species as well as conceptual figures for the vulnerability framework used. Additional figures are also provided c...
Article
Additional information for «Unexpected high vulnerability of functions in wilderness areas: evidence from coral reef fishes » concerning the Methods and Results section. The Life History Traits (LHT) categorization is described in details, and additional references using those LHT are given. In addition, details concerning the taxonomic and functio...
Article
Additional figures and tables to complement «Unexpected high vulnerability of functions in wilderness areas: evidence from coral reef fishes ». This is a set of figures first to complement the Methods such as the accumulation curves of species as well as conceptual figures for the vulnerability framework used. Additional figures are also provided c...
Thesis
Full-text available
Au-delà de la perte de richesse spécifique, les activités humaines entraînent probablement la diminution de la diversité phylogénétique et fonctionnelle portée par les espèces dans les communautés. Comprendre les effets des activités humaines sur l’ensemble des facettes de la biodiversité liées au fonctionnement des écosystèmes et évaluer les outil...
Article
The Coral Sea, located at the southwestern rim of the Pacific Ocean, is the only tropical marginal sea where human impacts remain relatively minor. Patterns and processes identified within the region have global relevance as a baseline for understanding impacts in more disturbed tropical locations. Despite 70 years of documented research, the Coral...

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