Stephanie M. Curenton

Stephanie M. Curenton
Boston University | BU · School of Education

PhD

About

55
Publications
16,077
Reads
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1,054
Citations
Citations since 2016
19 Research Items
644 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Additional affiliations
January 2007 - present
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
January 2005 - December 2007
Florida State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
Full-text available
Racism, a multidimensional system of oppression and exclusion, is part of the foundation of the United States and is detrimental to the health and well-being of Black communities and other racially and ethnically minoritized (REM) communities. There is an emerging body of literature that draws attention to the impact of racism and different raciali...
Article
We used the generalized propensity score method to estimate the differential effects of five Early Child Care and Education (ECCE) experiences (Prekindergarten, Head Start, Center-based Child Care, Home-based Child Care, and Parental Care) in reducing math and reading achievement gaps between boys versus girls, Latinx versus Whites, and Blacks vers...
Article
Research Findings: Children’s oral language skills lay the foundation for later literacy and can be fostered through responsive conversations with teachers. However, such conversations are rare in preschool, particularly between teachers and dual language learners (DLLs), or students who speak a minoritized language at home. DLLs benefit when their...
Article
This study used secondary data from the My Teaching Partner‐Math/Science 2013–2016 randomized control trial to explore whether equitable sociocultural classroom interactions (see Curenton et al., 2019) were associated with the skills of 105 four‐ and five‐year‐olds (52% boys; drawn from 20 unique video recordings of preschool teachers/classrooms; 4...
Article
This article presents a case study of a dual‐language learner (DLL) preschooler in three classroom conversations: whole group, small DLL group, and a teacher–child dyadic conversation. By comparing the student's interactions across three contexts, the authors show how dyadic conversations between teachers and students can foster the oral language s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Racial literacy as defined by Stevenson (2014) is an important cultural resistance strategy (e.g., positive coping strategy) for Black children and youth because it provides them with the skills needed to survive in a racist society. Stevenson’s work along with his colleague’s (Anderson et al., 2019) focuses on adolescents and those in middle child...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Children’s ethnic-racial identity formation is a critical aspect of their development and has implications across the lifespan. However, there has been limited attention to children’s ethnic-racial identity formation, especially among young children of color. This paper provides the current evidence of ethnic-racial identity formation in the early...
Article
Full-text available
The Special Issue on Early Care and Education (ECE) collaboration presents seven articles – followed by a commentary – that describe collaborations among different ECE programs. The articles present conceptual frameworks of ECE collaboration, explore the ways that organizations form and sustain ECE collaborations, and share findings regarding the o...
Article
We collaborated with Early Head Start (EHS) coaches to qualitatively explore the feasibility delivering a professional development approach designed to enhance the quality of conversations in infant-toddler (I/T) classrooms and family child care homes. First, we reviewed empirical literature about oral language discourse skills in infants and toddl...
Article
Full-text available
Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to refine and validate the Assessing Classroom Sociocultural Equity Scale (ACSES), an observation tool for measuring equitable sociocultural interactions in early childhood classrooms (pre-K to Grade 3) with racially minoritized learners (RMLs). Preliminary psychometric information from 142 observati...
Article
Full-text available
During qualitative phone interviews, middle-class, mostly married African American mothers (N = 25) describe their child-rearing responsibilities, practices, and values. They explain (a) why they decided to stay home or take work leave to attend to child rearing, (b) how they divided child-rearing responsibilities with their husbands/romantic partn...
Chapter
Full-text available
The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of African American children’s oral language skills with the intention of building the understanding of how these skills translate to classroom contexts. The chapter also summarizes the goals of the Common Core that are specifically related to speaking and listening and describes how African Ame...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, we dismantle the current educational rhetoric that pervasively characterizes Black children as being at-risk, deficient, or underachievers. Instead, we replace this deficit-oriented rhetoric with one that encapsulates the cultural and educational excellence that inspires Black children to reach their potential. First, we provide an...
Chapter
This introduction chapter provides an overview of the key issues highlighted throughout this book. First, we tackle why it is problematic to only characterize Black children’s accomplishment in terms of the “academic achievement gap.” Second, we discuss the importance of the home-school environment connection. Finally, we discuss the changes that n...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to report preliminary reliability and validity data from the Conversation Compass© Communication Screener (CCCS), a teacher-reported language screener intended to capture children’s skills related to classroom conversations with peers and teachers. Three preschool teachers completed the CCCS and the Child Observation R...
Article
This study used a multilevel mediation model to test the theory that former early childhood education (ECE) attendees' 5th grade achievement is mediated by the aggregate school-wide achievement of their elementary school. Aggregate school-wide achievement was defined as the percentage of 5th graders in a school who were at/above academic proficienc...
Article
Policy research highlights educational disparity between Blacks and Whites, thereby, emphasizing the need to determine malleable ecological factors that support the positive development and learning of Black children during the early schooling years. The purpose of this study was to examine whether change in home environment and neighborhood were a...
Article
Full-text available
This study provides qualitative and quantitative evidence of how an emotion explanation task can reflect African American preschoolers' pragmatic skills. We used an emotion explanation task to assess pragmatic skills among 19 children (aged 3-5 years) related to (1) engaging in conversational turn-taking, (2) answering Wh- questions, (3) engaging i...
Article
This book lays out how mental health practitioners can best engage parents in their childrens education for the child's best educational outcome. The book presents several different engagement strategies, allowing for differences in socio-political, cultural, and parental beliefs and understandings. Topics include information from early childhood,...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined mother-child interactions across two types of reading interactions—shared reading versus emergent reading—in order to determine (a) if mothers and children provide the same amount of language input across the two interactions, (b) if the socioemotional quality is consistent across the interactions, and (c) if the language input...
Article
Full-text available
The present study investigated the effect of professional development (PD) on preschool teachers’ conversational responsivity in the classroom, defined as teachers’ use of strategies to promote children's participation in extended conversational exchanges (communication-facilitating strategies) and exposure to advanced linguistic models (language-d...
Preprint
Full-text available
This is a paper I wrote back in 2012 when I was laying down the conceptualization for academic language in preschool. The paper was submitted to Journal of Early Childhood Literacy but the revision was not accepted. I am including it here as FYI, and so that people will have access to the concepts. This unpublished version can be cited as needed an...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Georgia's Pre-K Program offers universal voluntary prekindergarten to all 4-year-old children in the state. In 2007-2008, Georgia's preschool program served 76,491 children, around 53 percent of its 4-year-olds. The purpose of the study was to examine which household characteristics are related to the probability of participating in the voluntary p...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Florida's Voluntary Prekindergarten Program (VPK) has shown tremendous growth, serving about half of the state's 4-year-olds in 2005, its first year of operation, and about 66 percent currently. However, the lack of universal participation raises questions about the extent to which program awareness, socioeconomic background, or race and ethnic dif...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the extent to which teacher responsivity education affected preschoolers' language and literacy development over an academic year. Additional aims were to determine whether children's initial language abilities and teachers' use of responsivity strategies were associated with language outcomes, in particular. In this randomized...
Article
Full-text available
Seventy‐two African‐American and European American low‐income preschoolers attending Head Start and community childcare centres were asked to create an oral story using a wordless picture book, then told an oral story using the same book and asked follow‐up comprehension questions. Children’s performance was better on questions addressing the chara...
Article
Full-text available
This study illustrates the parenting experiences of a random sample of members of Mocha Moms, Inc., a national organization dedicated to supporting women of color who predominantly have elected not to work full-time outside of the home (www.mochamoms.org). Using modified grounded theory methods on 25 telephone interviews, we summarized the benefits...
Article
Full-text available
Dyadic shared‐reading and oral storytelling practices and their association to American preschoolers’ (N = 33) prosocial and problem behaviour was examined. The frequency (how often dyads read) and history (the child’s age at first reading) were examined within shared‐reading; emotion state talk and evaluative judgments were examined in both shared...
Article
Full-text available
This special issue presents quantitative and qualitative research on how narratives can be used as learning tools to promote school readiness. The articles focus on interventions investigating how families' oral narrating style impacts children's school readiness and how schools introduce children to narratives via teacher instruction, books, and t...
Article
Full-text available
reports of maltreatment. The significant SES distinguishers were poverty and parental education and employment. The signifi - cant parenting stress distinguishers were parental self-reports of a dysfunctional parent-child relationship and difficult child temperament. maltreating and Head Start families were similar in terms of poverty, but only the...
Article
Full-text available
Research Findings: This research investigated the associations among children's preliteracy skills, mothers' education, and mothers' beliefs about shared-reading interactions for 45 Appalachian families. These variables were studied for lower income, primarily European American, families residing in a geographically isolated, small, rural community...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined 33 mothers' and preschoolers' oral language skills (decontextualized discourse) across an emergent reading, shared reading, and oral storytelling interaction. The sample comprised primarily African American families from various socioeconomic backgrounds, ranging from Head Start families to middle-income families. Two measures o...
Article
Full-text available
Two studies investigated the influence of age, language, and family background on the development of preschoolers' social cognitive skills. Study 1 examined variability in economically disadvantaged preschoolers' understanding of fantasy and evaluated the relation of age and language to children's skill in this area. Children were shown drawings of...
Article
Full-text available
Low-income preschoolers' use of literate language features in oral narratives across three age groups (3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds) and two ethnic groups (Caucasian and African American) was examined. Sixty-seven preschoolers generated a story using a wordless picture book. The literate language features examined were simple and complex elaborated noun...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the relationship between narrative skills and theory of mind for low-income children. Two groups of low-income preschoolers, one African American (n = 33) and one European American (n = 36), created a narrative and participated in a false belief task. The European Americans outperformed African Americans on the false belief...
Article
Full-text available
A group of 72 preschoolers (36 African Americans, 36 European Americans) enrolled in Head Start programs and other preschools serving low-income children were asked 3 variations of false-belief questions across 3 scenarios and given a language and cognition subtest. Children's performance varied across the questions and tasks, but after covarying f...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined low-income African American and European American preschoolers' socioemotional causal attributions. Forty-seven Young (M = 48 months) and Old (M = 62 months) preschoolers were asked to justify a puppet's current emotion and to talk about their past emotional experiences. Responses were coded for Causal Theme and Clarity. Old pre...
Article
Full-text available
There is controversy over how well children understand pretense. One possibility is that for young children, pretense is not a mental state but is merely an external manifestation. If so, young children would think inanimates can pretend, because inanimates can be like other entities. Four experiments tested this. When shown pictured items, 4-year-...
Article
Full-text available
Assessing the New Federalism is a multiyear Urban Institute project designed to analyze the devolution of responsibility for social programs from the federal government to the states, focusing primarily on health care, income security, employment and training programs, and social services. Researchers monitor program changes and fiscal developments...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
This project attempts to change preschool teachers' practices related to facilitation children's conversation skills in the classroom. It is focused on effective open-ended questioning, promoting peer conversations, and listening to peer conversations. A practitioner-oriented book related to this work is published by Redleaf Press and called "Conversation Compass: A Teachers' Guide to High-quality Language Learning"