Stephanie Cacioppo

Stephanie Cacioppo
University of Chicago | UC · The Division of Biological Sciences

Ph.D.

About

148
Publications
144,761
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
7,758
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2012 - present
University of Chicago
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (148)
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has linked perceived social isolation (loneliness) to reduced antiviral immunity, but the immunologic effects of the objective social isolation imposed by pandemic “shelter in place” (SIP) policies is unknown. We assessed the immunologic impact of SIP by relocating 21 adult male rhesus macaques from 2,000-m ² field cage communitie...
Article
Since ancient times, millions of people have died of epidemics of plague, flu, cholera, and other infections caused by bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms. Major advances in medicine have largely eliminated these mass killers with vaccines and antibiotics. However, modern societies are facing a new kind of epidemics: behavioral epidemics. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are social animals that experience intense suffering when they perceive a lack of social connection. Modern societies are experiencing an epidemic of loneliness. While the experience of loneliness is universally human, some people report experiencing greater loneliness than others. Loneliness is more strongly associated with mortality than o...
Article
Loneliness, or perceived social isolation, may be evident in any group-living species, although its assessment in nonhumans provides some measurement challenges. It is well-known that loneliness in humans confers significant risk for morbidity and mortality, although mechanisms remain unclear. The authors describe a naturally-occurring model of lon...
Article
Full-text available
Exposure to a major traumatic stressor increases the odds of negative mental health and maladaptive behavioral outcomes not only for victims but also for 1st responders and health care professionals who are exposed to the aftermath. This study investigates the extent to which psychological resilience acts as either a Protective (i.e., vaccine-like)...
Article
Loneliness is a negative and distressing emotional state that arises from a discrepancy between one's desired and achieved levels of social connectedness. The evolutionary theory of loneliness (ETL) posits that experiencing loneliness is an inherited adaptation that signals that salutary social relations are endangered or damaged and prompts people...
Article
Negative social experiences may influence psychological and physiological health via altered central oxytocin communication. The prairie vole is valuable for investigating the potential influence of oxytocin on responses to social experiences. Prairie voles are socially monogamous, live in pairs or family groups, and respond negatively to changes i...
Article
Full-text available
Cambridge Core - Social Psychology - The New Psychology of Love - edited by Robert J. Sternberg
Preprint
Full-text available
A bstract Humans are social animals that experience intense suffering when they perceive a lack of social connection. Modern societies are experiencing an epidemic of loneliness. While the experience of loneliness is universally human, some people report experiencing greater loneliness than others. Loneliness is more strongly associated with mortal...
Article
Full-text available
Loneliness is thought to serve as an adaptive signal indicating the need to repair or replace salutary social connections. Accordingly, loneliness may influence preferences for interpersonal distance. If loneliness simply motivates a desire to socially reconnect, then loneliness may be associated with a preference for smaller interpersonal distance...
Data
Supporting information for the association between loneliness and interpersonal distance. Figure A. Odds ratios and associated 95% Wald confidence intervals (reported as “OR (5th percentile– 95th percentile)” for each predictor in the Study 2 replication of the final model obtained from step-wise selection in Study 1. Negative odds ratios indicate...
Preprint
Loneliness is thought to serve as an adaptive signal indicating the need to repair or replace salutary social connections. Accordingly, loneliness may influence preferences for interpersonal distance. If loneliness simply motivates a desire to socially reconnect, then loneliness may be associated with a preference for smaller interpersonal distance...
Article
SCIENTIFIC Representative longitudinal studies of older adults are important for identifying risk factors for adverse mental and physical health outcomes. The Chicago Health, Aging, and Social Relations Study (CHASRS) is a 10-wave longitudinal, population-based study of 229 Caucasians, African American, and Hispanic men and women who ranged from 50...
Article
Full-text available
Inferring intentions of others is one of the most intriguing issues in interpersonal interaction. Theories of embodied cognition and simulation suggest that this mechanism takes place through a direct and automatic matching process that occurs between an observed action and past actions. This process occurs via the reactivation of past self-related...
Article
Introduction: Recent advances in neuroimaging offer an unprecedented window into the female sexual brain. The small samples and poor statistical power of individual functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have limited what can be gleaned about the systematic brain network that is involved in female sexual desire and female sexual dysfunction...
Article
Loneliness has been posited to increase the motivation to repair or replace deficient social relationships and, seemingly paradoxically, to increase the implicit motivation for self-preservation. In the current research, we report a cross-lagged panel analysis of 10 waves of longitudinal data (N = 229) on loneliness and self-centeredness (as gauged...
Article
Full-text available
Persuasion, a prevalent form of social influence in humans, refers to an active attempt to change a person’s attitudes, beliefs, or behavior. There is a growing literature on the neural correlates of persuasion. As is often the case in an emerging literature, however, there are a number of questions, concerns, and alternative interpretations that c...
Article
Loneliness has been shown to predict mental health problems and suicide in active duty soldiers. In the present study, we examined distal (e.g., demographic & socioeconomic characteristics) to proximal factors (e.g., platoon relations, relationship quality) that were associated with loneliness in active duty soldiers in the U.S. Army. Results revea...
Article
Perceived social isolation (PSI), colloquially known as loneliness, is associated with selectively altered attentional, cognitive, and affective processes in humans, but the neural mechanisms underlying these adjustments remain largely unexplored. Behavioral, eye tracking, and neuroimaging research has identified associations between PSI and implic...
Chapter
Social exclusion has been defined broadly as the experience of being kept apart from others physically or emotionally. Our basic premise regarding the psychological study of social exclusion is that the brain is the key organ for forming, monitoring, maintaining, repairing, and replacing the salutary connections with others that Homo sapiens, as a...
Article
We introduce a new analytic technique for the microsegmentation of high-density EEG to identify the discrete brain microstates evoked by the visual reversal checkerboard task. To test the sensitivity of the present analytic approach to differences in evoked brain microstates across experimental conditions, subjects were instructed to (a) passively...
Article
Full-text available
The reliance on small samples and underpowered studies may undermine the replicability of scientific findings. Large sample sizes may be necessary to achieve adequate statistical power. Crowdsourcing sites such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk) have been regarded as an economical means for achieving larger samples. Because MTurk participants may...
Article
Full-text available
According to the differential reactivity hypothesis, lonely individuals respond differently to their environment compared to nonlonely individuals, which may sustain their loneliness levels. However, this interesting hypothesis has not yet been explored in daily life: Do lonely individuals feel lonely all the time, or do they feel more or less lone...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Although a large number of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have investigated the neural bases of empathy, little is known about its spatiotemporal dynamics or its modulation by the level of friendship between the observer and the agent who is being hurt. Moreover, most of the previous studies on empathy have focuse...
Article
Full-text available
Whether you feel dissociated from the rest of the world or from yourself, you feel some kind of mental dissociations. Each form of mental dissociations varies in symptomatology and associated deficits. Nevertheless, psychiatrists, neurologists, and neuroscientists have discussed, for decades, the possibility of a holistic neural mechanism underlyin...
Chapter
INTRODUCTION Luck and Kappenman (Chapter 5, this volume) discussed fundamental issues around recording, editing, and analyzing data from electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERPs). In this chapter, the focus is on the spatiotemporal dynamics of EEG and ERPs, with an emphasis on identifying, quantifying, and analyzing stable br...
Article
Social species are so characterized because they form organizations that extend beyond the individual. The goal of social neuroscience is to investigate the biological mechanisms that underlie these social structures, processes, and behaviors and the influences between social and neural structures and processes. Such an endeavor is challenging beca...
Article
Full-text available
Prior research has suggested that loneliness is associated with an implicit hypervigilance to social threats-an assumption in line with the evolutionary model of loneliness that indicates feeling socially isolated (or on the social perimeter) leads to increased attention and surveillance of the social world and an unwitting focus on self-preservati...
Article
Full-text available
Scholars from different disciplines have investigated the nature of love for centuries. It has been only in the past century that social psychologists have begun to scientifically investigate the complexity of love in comparison with other emotions (Hatfield & Rapson, 2009, for review). We laud Lamy (2016) for his thoughtful intentions to pursue th...
Article
Being on the social perimeter is not only sad, it is dangerous. Our evolutionary model of the effects of perceived social isolation (loneliness) on the brain as well as a growing body of behavioral research suggests that loneliness promotes short-term self-preservation, including an increased implicit vigilance for social, in contrast to nonsocial,...
Article
Full-text available
Can social resilience be trained? We report results of a double-dissociative randomized controlled study in which 48 Army platoons were randomly assigned to social resilience training (intervention condition) or cultural awareness training (active control group). The same surveys were administered to all platoons at baseline and after the completio...
Article
Full-text available
In 1978, when the Task Panel report to the U.S. President’s Commission on Mental Health emphasized the importance of improving health care and easing the pain of those suffering from emotional distress syndromes including loneliness, few anticipated that this issue would still need to be addressed 40 years later. In 2011, a meta-analysis on the eff...
Article
Full-text available
Loneliness typically refers to the feelings of distress and dysphoria resulting from a discrepancy between a person's desired and achieved levels of social relations, and there is now considerable evidence that loneliness is a risk factor for poor psychological and physical health. Loneliness has traditionally been conceptualized as a uniquely huma...
Article
Full-text available
As a complex trait, loneliness is likely to be influenced by the interplay of numerous genetic and environmental factors. Studies in behavioral genetics indicate that loneliness has a sizable degree of heritability. Candidate-gene and gene-expression studies have pointed to several genes related to neurotransmitters and the immune system. The notio...
Article
Full-text available
Neuroscience research suggests that inferring neutral intentions of other people recruits a specific brain network within the inferior fronto-parietal action observation network as well as a putative social network including brain areas subserving theory of mind, such as the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), the temporo-parietal junction (...
Article
Full-text available
Studying the way athletes predict actions of their peers during fast-ball sports, such as a tennis, has proved to be a valuable tool for increasing our knowledge of intention understanding. The working model in this area is that the anticipatory representations of others' behaviors require internal predictive models of actions formed from pre-estab...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Since Berger's first EEG recordings in 1929, several techniques, initially developed for investigating periodic processes, have been applied to study non-periodic event-related brain state dynamics. New method: We provide a theoretical comparison of the two approaches and present a new suite of data-driven analytic tools for the spec...
Article
Full-text available
Social isolation has been recognized as a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in humans for more than a quarter century. The brain is the key organ of social connections and processes, however, and the same objective social relationship can be experienced as caring and protective or as exploitive and isolating. We review evidence that the...
Article
Full-text available
Social isolation has been recognized as a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in humans for more than a quarter of a century. Although the focus of research has been on objective social roles and health behavior, the brain is the key organ for forming, monitoring, maintaining, repairing, and replacing salutary connections with others. Acc...
Article
Interpersonal synchrony is characterized by a temporary alignment of periodic behaviors with another person. This process requires that at least one of the two individuals monitors and adjusts their movements to maintain alignment with the other individual (the referent). Interestingly, recent research on interpersonal synchrony has found that peop...
Article
Full-text available
Reading other people's eyes is a valuable skill during interpersonal interaction. Although a number of studies have investigated visual patterns in relation to the perceiver's interest, intentions, and goals, little is known about eye gaze when it comes to differentiating intentions to love from intentions to lust (sexual desire). To address this q...
Article
Most mental disorders involve disruptions of normal social behavior. Social neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field devoted to understanding the biological systems underlying social processes and behavior, and the influence of the social environment on biological processes, health and well-being. Research in this field has grown dramatically in...
Article
Full-text available
There is an extensive literature on the negativity bias, including its conceptualization, measurement, temporal stability (individual differences), and neural and genetic associations. Hibbing et al. posit that the difference across individuals in the negativity bias is a key factor in determining political predisposition. The measures and paradigm...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous studies have shown a 'negativity bias' in emotion processing and effect of menstrual phase on emotion processing. Most of these results, however, did not match the arousal of different types of stimuli. The present study examined the time course of negative emotion processing across different menstrual phases (e.g., late luteal/premenstrua...
Article
Research in social epidemiology suggests that the absence of positive social relationships is a significant risk factor for broad-based morbidity and mortality. The nature of these social relationships and the mechanisms underlying this association are of increasing interest as the population gets older and the health care costs associated with chr...
Article
Full-text available
DEFINITION OF LONELINESS Described in the scientific literature more than 30years ago, the feeling of being lonely is charac-terized as feeling socially isolated or on the social perimeter [3]. It is noteworthy that feeling lonely does not necessarily mean being physically alone. Loneliness corresponds to a discrepancy between the relationships one...
Article
Full-text available
Social species are so characterized because they form organizations that extend beyond the individual; such structures evolved hand in hand with psychological, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms. The goal of social neuroscience is to identify these biological mechanisms and to specify the influences between social and neural structu...
Article
Full-text available
sc ientific american mind november/dec ember 2013 P eople often think of love and lust as polar opposites—love exalted as the binder of two souls, lust the transient devil on our shoul-ders, disturbing and disruptive. Now neuro-scientists are discovering that lust and love work togeth-er more closely than we think. Indeed, the strongest relationshi...
Article
Full-text available
Social neuroscience emerged more than 20 years ago and has grown into a mature interdisciplinary scientific field. Research now provides compelling evidence that the structure and function of the nervous system are influenced by the social environment. Recent work in social genomics further underscores the importance of the social environment by de...
Article
Full-text available
Robert Weiss (1973) conceptualised loneliness as perceived social isolation, which he described as a gnawing, chronic disease without redeeming features. On the scale of everyday life, it is understandable how something as personally aversive as loneliness could be regarded as a blight on human existence. However, evolutionary time and evolutionary...
Article
Full-text available
Early neuroimaging studies using Cyberball suggested that social rejection activated the pain matrix, as identified in studies of physical pain. However, these early studies were characterized by small sample sizes. Our statistical multi-level kernel density analysis (MKDA) of Cyberball neuroimaging studies with 244 participants fails to support th...
Data
Full-text available
Supplementary Information
Article
Full-text available
Marital discord is costly to children, families, and communities. The advent of the Internet, social networking, and on-line dating has affected how people meet future spouses, but little is known about the prevalence or outcomes of these marriages or the demographics of those involved. We addressed these questions in a nationally representative sa...
Article
Full-text available
A growing body of behavioral studies has demonstrated that women's hemispheric specialization varies as a function of their menstrual cycle, with hemispheric specialization enhanced during their menstruation period. Our recent high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) study with lateralized emotional versus neutral words extended these behavioral res...
Data
Experimental paradigm. Letter-string were presented bilaterally as participants centrally fixated. (EPS)
Data
List of French words used during the present lexical decision task. (DOCX)
Data
Mean and standard deviations for hormone levels during menstrual cycle phases. (DOC)