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Steph Gardner

Steph Gardner
UNSW Sydney | UNSW · School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (BEES)

PhD

About

26
Publications
3,624
Reads
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274
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2016 - December 2016
Institut de Ciències del Mar, Barcelona, Spain
Position
  • Researcher
September 2014 - November 2017
University of Technology Sydney
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Demonstrator for second year subject Marine Communities 91157
February 2014 - June 2017
University of Technoloy Sydney
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Demonstrator for second year subject Ecology 91154
Education
July 2011 - July 2012
University of Technology Sydney
Field of study
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Environmental Science
March 2007 - June 2011
University of Technology Sydney
Field of study
  • Bachelor of Science (Marine Biology) Bachelor of Business (Tourism)

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Corals are among the most active producers of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a key molecule in marine sulfur cycling, yet the specific physiological role of DMSP in corals remains elusive. Here, we examine the oxidative stress response of three coral species (Acropora millepora, Stylophora pistillata and Pocillopora damicornis) and explore the...
Article
Full-text available
Coral cell cultures made from reef-building scleractinian corals have the potential to aid in the pursuit of understanding of the cnidarian–dinoflagellate symbiosis. Various methods have previously been described for the production of cell cultures in vitro with a range of success and longevity. In this study, viable tissue spheroids con-taining ho...
Article
Full-text available
Dinoflagellates of the family Symbiodiniaceae form mutualistic symbioses with marine invertebrates such as reef‐building corals, but also inhabit reef environments as free‐living cells. Most coral species acquire Symbiodiniaceae horizontally from the surrounding environment during the larval and/or recruitment phase, however the phylogenetic divers...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change threatens the survival of sclerac-tinian coral from exposure to concurrent ocean warming, acidification and deoxygenation; how corals can potentially adapt to this trio of stressors is currently unknown. This study investigates three coral species (Acropora muricata, Acrop-ora pulchra and Porites lutea) dominant in an extreme mangrov...
Poster
Full-text available
Two pressing issues facing the world today are climate change and gender equality and they are intrinsically linked. Research has shown climate change has a disproportionate impact on women and children, due to unfair distribution of roles, resources and leadership. Currently, less than 26% of the world's researchers are women and even fewer are in...
Poster
Full-text available
Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are essential constituents of marine ecosystems, where they are sources of atmospheric reactivity, indicators of the ecosystem state, and chemical cues for organism-organism communication. Most of VOCs result from photobiological and photochemical processes; however, their light-driven dynamics and short-t...
Poster
Full-text available
Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) other than DMS are largely overlooked constituents of coral reef ecosystems. Even though they are sources of atmospheric reactivity and potential chemical cues for organism-organism communication, their production and cycling processes by the reef components are poorly constrained. We measured VOCs in sea...
Article
Full-text available
Repeat marine heat wave‐induced mass coral bleaching has decimated reefs in Seychelles for 35 years, but how coral‐associated microbial diversity (microalgal endosymbionts of the family Symbiodiniaceae and bacterial communities) potentially underpins broad‐scale bleaching dynamics remains unknown. We assessed microbiome composition during the 2016...
Article
Full-text available
Light availability is considered a key factor regulating the thermal sensitivity of reef building corals, where excessive excitation of photosystem II (PSII) further exacerbates pressure on photochemical pathways already compromised by heat stress. Coral symbionts acclimate to changes in light availability (photoacclimation) by continually fine-tun...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Climate change causes the breakdown of the symbiotic relationships between reef-building corals and their photosynthetic symbionts (genus Symbiodinium), with thermal anomalies in 2015-2016 triggering the most widespread mass coral bleaching on record and unprecedented mortality on the Great Barrier Reef. Targeted studies using specific...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs are deteriorating under climate change as oceans continue to warm and acidify and thermal anomalies grow in frequency and intensity. In vitro experiments are widely used to forecast reef-building coral health into the future, but often fail to account for the complex ecological and biogeochemical interactions that govern reefs. Conseque...
Article
Full-text available
Coral bleaching is intensifying with global climate change. While the causes for these catastrophic events are well understood, the cellular mechanism that triggers bleaching is not well established. Our understanding of coral bleaching processes is hindered by the lack of robust methods for studying interactions between host and symbiont at the si...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In coral reef ecosystems, the presence and functional role(s) of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) have only more recently been investigated. DMSP represents a major fraction of organic sulphur within marine phytoplankton and is involved in the transfer of sulphur through the marine food web. Dinoflagellates are among the biggest producers of DMSP...

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