Stein Farstadvoll

Stein Farstadvoll
UiT The Arctic University of Norway · Department of Archaeology, History, Religious Studies and Theology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

15
Publications
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30
Citations

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
For the last decade, the World War II prisoner-of-war camp and battery at Sværholt in northernmost Norway have been objects of archaeological investigation. This article presents the results from excavations and associated studies, including new descriptions of extant structures and found artefacts, comparative osteological analyses of middens, and...
Article
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Global crises drastically alter human behavior, rapidly impacting patterns of movement and consumption. A rapid-response analysis of material culture brings new perspective to disasters as they unfold. We present a case study of the coronavirus pandemic in Tromsø, Norway, based on fieldwork from March 2020 to April 2021. Using a methodology rooted...
Article
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This article shows how to record current events from an archaeological perspective. With a case study from the COVID-19 pandemic in Norway, we provide accessible tools to document broad spatial and behavioral patterns through material culture as they emerge. Stressing the importance of ethical engagement with contemporary subjects, we adapt archaeo...
Chapter
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This text will explore three different facets of Retiro that constitute and continue to shape the place today, namely fungi, invasive organisms, and “feral” artefacts. These examples were chosen because they are rather unconventional in the traditional frame of cultural heritage, but no less importantly because they quite literally brought attentio...
Presentation
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The main and general point in this presentation is that archaeological heritage and artifacts are in their ecological effects and physicality inherently environmental. Thus, the connection between archaeology and the Environment is not really a choice, but something inherent in dealing with a material world. This connects to the theme given to my p...
Article
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One of the main purposes of The Act of 19 June 2009 No.100 Relating to the Management of Biological, Geological and Landscape Diversity is to protect landscape diversity. Consequently, protection of cultural heritage is also an integrated part of the management of Landscape Protection Areas. Via a case study of the Second World War Luftwaffe storag...
Research
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Denne rapporten tar for seg en arkeologisk registering av kulturminner i og rundt Luftwaffe-leiren fra andre verdenskrig ved Gjøkåsen like sør-vest for Noatun. Leiren ligger sør i Pasvikdalen i Sør-Varanger kommune. Området som ble undersøkt ligger også innenfor den nordlige enden av Øvre Pasvik landskapsvernområde. Den arkeologiske undersøkelsen b...
Chapter
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The present paper by Saphinaz Naguib and its integrated photographic essay by Stein Farstadvoll address the cultural dimension of sustainability and questions pertaining to heritage in the twenty-first century, with Vardø, a small fishing town in the north-eastern coast of Norway, as our object of study. The two essays are set in a dialogic relatio...
Thesis
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This dissertation explores the contemporary archaeological record of Retiro, a derelict 19th-century landscape garden and summer estate located in the town of Molde on the north-western coast of Norway. The main topic that this thesis investigates is the consequences of acknowledging Retiro with its excess of unruly and apparently ruinous character...
Article
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This article addresses things that can be described as rudimentary and vestigial; for example, an arguably out-of-place snow stake encountered in a derelict 19thcentury landscape garden during an archaeological surface survey. How can one approach this stake without removing or overlooking its vestigial character? The term hyperart is introduced to...
Article
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Plant remains have long been a source of information about the distant past in archaeology, but are undertheorized or even overlooked in the field of contemporary archaeology. This article uses the example of a derelict nineteenth-century landscape garden in a town on the northwestern coast of Norway to show how novel insights about plants can be d...
Article
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This article discusses how dilapidated material heritage could be understood as something more than just an abject phenomenon. Archaeology of the recent past offers an opportunity to consider such things from a more nuanced perspective that don’t dismiss them out of hand. These nuances shed new light on how dilapidated things shape our experience o...
Thesis
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Denne avhandlingen utforsket gjennom fenomenologisk teori hvordan ting og opplevelser spiller sammen i formidlingen og iscenesettingen av fortid ved Lofotr Viking Museum på Borg. Hovedårsaken til at Lofotr har blitt valgt ut som avhandlingens case study, er museets fokus på levendegjøring og fullskala rekonstruksjoner. Premisset som blir drøftet er...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
So, what is this PostDoc research project going to be about? A good place to start is with the word “aftermath” from the title. Today the word has mostly a sinister meaning, denoting a period of time following a destructive and harmful event like a war or a natural disaster. These aftermaths are often seen as unwelcome and harmful consequences, may it, for example, be famine, unexploded ordnance, or radioactivity. Importantly, it is a word that acknowledges that events can linger and produce effects long after they occurred. However, aftermath also has an older and more innocuous second meaning, which was the new growth of grass, or the second crop, that grew on the land after the first crop was cut and harvested. Thus, it is a word with two potentially very different associations, which both refer to things that follow a significant event. Importantly, for my project, aftermath highlight two tensions that will be central to the research: Firstly, the tension between destruction and creation; where a calamitous event lead to the creation of something new and different. Secondly, with regards to the second meaning of aftermath, it highlights a tension between the anthropogenic and the natural, i.e. things that grow and develop after human involvement in an event. As the second half of the title point to, this project will focus on case studies that relate in some way to both war, that is anthropogenic heritage, and nature, i.e. the non-human environment. The research will focus on two different case studies from the Second World War in Northern Norway. However, it is the aftermath of these sites that will be the focus of the research: what has become and are becoming of these modern ruin war landscapes today. What I am especially interested in is how these sites have become a part of and shape the present-day landscape, that is their afterlife. I am interested in how the landscapes have developed into hybrid environments that are simultaneously defined by both anthropogenic and non-human influences. This fit neatly into the Unruly Heritage project’s central aims to formulate alternative and less anthropocentric understandings of heritage, by focusing on how anthropogenic legacies linger on beyond their intended uses and how they affect both humans and non-humans. More specifically, this project aims to explore the intersection between modern ruin landscapes and natural environments. Here I am especially interested in protected areas that mostly focus on nature, like wildlife reserves and protected landscape areas, which also partly consist of and hosts “unruly” material heritage from the recent past that might seem at first seem at odds with traditional conservation goals, such as authenticity and immaculate environments. The project is looking into the in the fuzzy meeting point between “nature” and the “anthropogenic”, and not least the past and the present. The research will rely on archaeological fieldwork to gather empirical information about both natural and cultural objects, that can illuminate the afterlife and ecology of lingering war sites.
Project
According to UNESCO’s definition, heritage is “our legacy from the past, what we live with today, and what we pass on to future generations”. While exemplary inclusive, it is hardly made out of concern for the fact that our legacy is becoming increasingly mixed and messy: melting glaciers, archipelagos of sea-borne debris, ruining metropolises, industrial wastelands, sunken nuclear submarines, toxic residues in seals and polar bears. Actually, our legacy has become so conspicuously manifest that it has been claimed diagnostic of a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene. While this palpable legacy has triggered debate within the heritage field, it has yet not led to any profound rethinking of heritage itself. Conceptualized only as a threat to heritage, not as heritage, the traditional understanding of heritage as an exclusive reserve of valued things and traditions safely persists. This project explores another position. It claims that the current “clash” between prevailing conceptions of heritage as something confined, wished for, and thus worth saving, and an unruly past ignoring such work of purification, urges a reconsideration of strategies and rationales for how to “deal” with heritage. Based on extensive case studies of modern ruin landscapes and sea-borne coastal debris, the aim is to develop alternative, less anthropocentric and more ecologically adept heritage understandings. Hence, what this project undertakes to explore is possible outcomes of exposing heritage also to the masses of neglected and unwanted matters we pass on and live with. How does it force us to rethink memory, what ethical questions arise, and how can a notion of care be applied to these hybrid assemblages? The project is granted funding for the period 2017-2021 through the Norwegian Research Council’s Toppforsk programme.
Project
This PhD project explores the afterlife of Retiro, a derelict 19th-century garden located in the town of Molde. It explores the implications of seeing Retiro in its current ruinous and overgrown state, as heritage. This means extending heritage to things that would usually be omitted from conventional understandings, such as modern garbage and the non-native plants found there today. Data was gathered from repeated on-site surveys, during different seasons, and included such methods as photography and on-site description, seeking to highlight the unique aspects that emerge when things are left to their own devices. The concluding claim is made, that approaches like the one developed through this research can contribute to an environmentally concerned contemporary archaeology. That is, one that acknowledges how heritage is partly constituted by non-humans, like for example plants, fungi, and plastic, and which is concerned with how material heritage is inherited by both humans and non-humans.