Stefania Vitale

Stefania Vitale
University of Strasbourg | UNISTRA · Institut de science et d'ingénierie supramoléculaires (ISIS)

PhD

About

32
Publications
3,862
Reads
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524
Citations
Citations since 2017
19 Research Items
503 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
Introduction
Material chemist with a solid physical-chemistry background and relevant expertise in surface engineering, nanomaterials functionalisation and material surfaces characterisation.
Additional affiliations
August 2020 - present
University of Strasbourg
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2017 - July 2020
University College Dublin
Position
  • PostDoc Position
November 2013 - March 2017
University of Catania
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
November 2013 - March 2017
University of Catania
Field of study
  • Chemistry
October 2009 - July 2011
University of Catania
Field of study
  • Material Chemistry

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered a promising tool in the context of biofilm control. Many studies have shown that different types of NPs can interfere with the bacterial metabolism and cellular membranes, thus making them potential antibacterial agents; however, fundamental understanding is still lacking on the exact mechanisms involved in these...
Article
Full-text available
Organic light-emitting devices are key components for emerging opto- and nanoelectronics applications including health monitoring and smart displays. Here, we report a foldable inverted polymer light-emitting diode (iPLED) based on a self-suspended asymmetrical vertical nanoscaffold replacing the conventional sandwich-like structured LEDs. Our empt...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The ubiquitous nature of bacterial biofilms combined with the enhanced resistance towards antimicrobials has led to the development of an increasing number of strategies for biofilm eradication. Such strategies must take into account the existence of extracellular polymeric substances, which obstruct the diffusion of antibiofilm agents...
Article
Full-text available
Biofilms are microbial communities embedded in an extracellular polymeric matrix and display an enhanced tolerance to the action of antimicrobials. The emergence of novel functionalised nanoparticles is considered a promising avenue for the development of biofilm-specific antimicrobial technologies. However, there is a gap in the understanding of i...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Considering the timeline required for the development of novel antimicrobial drugs, increased attention should be given to repurposing old drugs and improving antimicrobial efficacy, particularly for chronic infections associated with biofilms. Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MR...
Article
Full-text available
The contribution of the biofilm extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix to reduced antimicrobial susceptibility in biofilms is widely recognised. As such, the direct targeting of the EPS matrix is a promising biofilm control strategy that allows for the disruption of the matrix, thereby allowing a subsequent increase in susceptibility to ant...
Article
Full-text available
Polypyridine-based ruthenium complexes are among the most interesting photoactive molecular systems, in virtue of a number of outstanding (photo)physicochemical properties. To exploit such properties in solid-state applications, such as molecular electronics, optoelectronics, and photovoltaics, tailored experimental strategies are needed for the an...
Article
Full-text available
The commercial use of nanoparticles has increased in recent years due to their unique characteristics, including high surface area, modifiable shape and surface charge and size-dependent properties. Consequently, a greater number of nanomaterials are now being released into the environment and inevitably interact with the natural ecosystem. Bacteri...
Article
Polypyridine-based ruthenium complexes are among the most interesting photoactive molecular systems, in virtue of a number of outstanding (photo)physicochemical properties. To exploit such properties in solid-state applications, such as molecular electronics, optoelectronics, and photovoltaics, tailored experimental strategies are needed for the an...
Article
Full-text available
Bacterial biofilms are microbial communities in which bacterial cells in sessile state are mechanically and chemically protected against foreign agents, thus enhancing antibiotic resistance. The delivery of active compounds to the inside of biofilms is often hindered due to the existence of the biofilm extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and t...
Article
Biofilms are communities of microorganisms enclosed in a self-generated matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). While biofilm recalcitrance and persistence are caused by several factors, a reduction in antimicrobial susceptibility has been closely associated with the generation of pH gradients within the biofilm structure. Cells embedde...
Article
The negative consequences of biofilms are widely reported. A defining feature of biofilms is the extracellular matrix, a complex mixture of biomacromolecules, termed EPS, which contributes to reduced antimicrobial susceptibility. EPS targeting is a promising, but underexploited, approach to biofilm control allowing disruption of the matrix and ther...
Article
The fabrication of stable, highly conductive molecular nano-junctions is one of the main research goals in the field of molecular electronics. In this paper we report on the self-assembly and functional characterisation of highly conductive molecular wires, based on mixed-metal polynuclear complexes, at the surface of a transparent conductive oxide...
Preprint
Full-text available
Attempts to deal with the problem of detrimental biofilms using nanoparticle technologies have generally focussed on exploiting biocidal approaches. However, it is now recognised that biofilm matrix-components may be targets for the disruption or dispersion of biofilms. Here, we show that the functionalization of gold nanoparticles with the enzyme,...
Article
The synthesis and the photophysical and redox properties of a new perylene bisiimide (PBI) species (L), bearing two 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) ligands at the two imide positions of the PBI, and of its dinuclear Ru(II) and Os(II) complexes, [(bpy)2Ru(μ-L)Ru(bpy)2](PF6)4 (Ru2; bpy = 2,2’-bipyridine) and [(Me2-bpy)2Ru(μ-L)Ru(Me2-bpy)2](PF6)4 (Os2; Me2...
Conference Paper
Polypyridine-based ruthenium complexes are amongst the most interesting photoactive molecular systems, in virtue of a number of outstanding (photo)physico-chemical properties (e.g. chemical stability, redox behaviour, excited-state reactivity, luminescence emission, and excited-state lifetime).[1, 2] In order to exploit such properties in solid st...
Article
This paper deals with the investigation of a stepwise surface priming strategy based on zirconium phosphate-phosphonate chemistry (ZP priming), which was applied for the first time to nanostructured, micrometer-thick titanium dioxide electrodes. Through the extensive use of secondary ion mass spectrometry(SIMS) depth profiling technique, it was pos...
Conference Paper
Nanostructured semiconducting oxides play an important role in dye-sensitized devices for solar energy conversion, such as Dye-sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) or Dye-sensitized Photoelectrosynthesis Cells (DSPECs). In those devices the process of solar energy conversion relies on the injection of an electron from a photoinduced excited state of a ph...
Article
The continuum equation is used for modeling erosion rate, ion beam induced mixing, and reactions during the sputtering process involved in secondary ion mass spectrometry experiments. We developed a new approach that is able to incorporate the beam induced reactivity, so leading to a reasonable simulation of depth profiles of polymers and organic s...
Article
A detailed depth characterization of multilayered polymeric systems is a very attractive topic. Currently, the use of cluster primary ion beams in time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry allows molecular depth profiling of organic and polymeric materials. Because typical raw data may contain thousands of peaks, the amount of information to m...
Article
Rationale: Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with polyatomic primary ions provides a successful tool for molecular depth profiling of polymer systems, relevant in many technological applications. Widespread C60 sources, however, cause in some polymers extensive damage with loss of molecular information along depth. We study a method, based on...
Article
We studied the polluting impact of a filling station on the surrounding area by means of a novel approach. Given the fact that a precise relation can be found between the influence of a physic obstacle on the dispersion of gaseous substances and the “shadow” effect of the same obstacle (i.e. the shielding of a light source), we collected data about...
Conference Paper
Since many years nanostructured semiconducting oxides are being studied in order to be used in devices for solar energy conversion, such as Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) and Dye Sensitized Photoelectrochemical Cells (DSPECs). These types of solar cells exploit a nanostructured, large-bandgap and transparent semiconductor oxide (several microme...
Conference Paper
Functionalization of oxide surfaces is a topic of great interest for a number of applications in various fields such as electronics, optoelectronics and sensors. A particularly interesting case is that of attaching dyes on transparent (semi)conducting oxides. Actually, the anchoring of photoactive molecular systems on oxide substrates is an importa...
Article
Full-text available
A new tetracobalt(iii) cubane , carrying functionalized peripheral ethynyl groups, was prepared. Cubane catalyses photoinduced water oxidation, indicating that the ethynyl groups do not negatively affect the catalytic properties of the Co cubane assembly. In contrast, the quantum yield for water oxidation (0.36) is significantly increased with resp...
Article
Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was applied in combination with optical absorption spectroscopy for studying the anchoring of polypyridine-based supramolecular layers on oxide surfaces, such as quartz or indium tin oxide, by means of a layer-by-layer method involving a self-assembly process relying on coordination interact...
Conference Paper
The analysis of materials containing hydrogen by Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy remains a “challenge” since many years. Along with the influence of molecular H2 on the glow discharge plasma (“H-effect”), the lack of suitable certified reference materials, useful for the calibration of hydrogen, is a big issue for the quantification of...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
In the context of charge transport mechanism through metal-molecule-metal junctions (with the molecular part being either (sub)monolayers or "long" (>5 nm) molecular wires of organic conjugated molecules), I have found a lot of papers describing systems where it exists a transition between tunneling (for short molecular systems, 2-3 nm) and hopping regime (longer systems, where the tunneling barrier would be too high). When it comes to the precise analysis of J-V characteristics, it is sometimes asserted, for a given molecular system, that the charge transport follows hopping mechanism because of a linear J vs 1/d dependence AND (at the same time) SCLC because of a quadratic dependence of J vs V (i.e. linear J vs V2 plot). Given that as far as I understood an SCLC transport should follow a law with general form of J ~ (V2/d3), I am struggling with the actual understanding of the overall charge transport phenomenon in those metal-molecule-metal systems. So, are SCLC transport and hopping the two sides of the same coin? Or are they completely different phenomena following different physical laws? I see my question might be a little tangled but I hope somebody used to deal with this matter could catch my point.
Thanks in advance.
Question
In the context of charge transport mechanism through metal-molecule-metal junctions (with the molecular part being either (sub)monolayers or "long" (>5 nm) molecular wires of organic conjugated molecules), I have found a lot of papers describing systems where it exists a transition between tunneling (for short molecular systems, 2-3 nm) and hopping regime (longer systems, where the tunneling barrier would be too high). When it comes to the precise analysis of J-V characteristics, it is sometimes asserted, for a given molecular system, that the charge transport follows hopping mechanism because of a linear J vs 1/d dependence AND (at the same time) SCLC because of a quadratic dependence of J vs V (i.e. linear J vs V2 plot). Given that as far as I understood an SCLC transport should follow a law with general form of J ~ (V2/d3), I am struggling with the actual understanding of the overall charge transport phenomenon in those metal-molecule-metal systems. So, are SCLC transport and hopping the two sides of the same coin? Or are they completely different phenomena following different physical laws? I see my question might be a little tangled but I hope somebody used to deal with this matter could catch my point.
Thanks in advance.

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Understand how nanoparticle composition and surface chemistry affect their interaction with the biofilm matrix (capture, distribution, selective interactions with specific matrix components,..) in order to develop smart nanoparticle-based strategies for biofilm control and eradication.