Stefan Schöneich

Stefan Schöneich
Friedrich Schiller University Jena | FSU · Institute of Zoology and Evolutionary Research

Dr. rer. nat.

About

35
Publications
6,685
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415
Citations
Citations since 2017
18 Research Items
301 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230204060
20172018201920202021202220230204060

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
Crickets carry wind-sensitive mechanoreceptors on their cerci, which in response to the airflow produced by approaching predators trigger escape reactions via ascending giant interneurons (GIs). Males also activate their cercal system by air currents generated due to the wing movements underlying sound production. Singing males still respond to ext...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the central nervous coordination between singing motor activity and abdominal ventilatory pumping in crickets. Fictive singing, with sensory feedback removed, was elicited by eserine-microinjection into the brain, and the motor activity underlying singing and abdominal ventilation was recorded with extracellular electrodes. During s...
Article
Field crickets are best known for the loud calling songs produced by males to attract conspecific females. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of the neurobiological basis underlying the acoustic communication for mate finding in field crickets with emphasis on the recent research progress to understand the neuronal networks for mot...
Article
Full-text available
How neural networks evolved to generate the diversity of species-specific communication signals is unknown. For receivers of the signals one hypothesis is that novel recognition phenotypes arise from parameter variation in computationally flexible feature detection networks. We test this hypothesis in crickets, where males generate and females reco...
Chapter
Full-text available
In cricket brains a neuropil area in the anterior ventral protocerebrum next to the pedunculus and the α-lobe is involved in the control of singing behaviour. Command interneurons for singing have dendrites in this neuropil, whereas their axon descends towards the ventral nerve cord. A bilateral calling song command neuron has been identified which...
Article
Mate advertisement signals can vary in their variability, with some signals or signal components being highly stereotyped and others highly variable. One hypothesis for differences in variability suggests that receivers provide stabilizing selection for signal components important for mate recognition, resulting in low variability, while also provi...
Preprint
Courtship signals may attract predators. Thus, finding a mating partner and avoiding predation are contradicting tasks with direct fitness consequences. It is unclear, however, how prey species balance the costs and benefits of those vital tasks over their lifetime. Here, we quantified how a prey species with a conspicuous courtship song, the bush-...
Preprint
Courtship signals may attract predators. Thus, finding a mating partner and avoiding predation are contradicting tasks with direct fitness consequences. It is unclear, however, how prey species balance the costs and benefits of those vital tasks over their lifetime. Here, we quantified how a prey species with a conspicuous courtship song, the bush-...
Article
Individual fitness can be boosted by behavioural strategies that maximise mate-finding probability while minimising predation risk. Animals that use acoustics to find mates may benefit from using both stationary calling and active exploration, but these also expose them to different types of predators. Studying calling and searching behaviours conc...
Preprint
Full-text available
How neural networks evolve to recognize species-specific communication signals is unknown. One hypothesis is that novel recognition phenotypes are produced by parameter variation in a computationally flexible "mother network". We test this hypothesis in crickets, where males produce and females recognize mating songs with a species-specific pulse p...
Article
Full-text available
Authors would like to update one of the references which went incorrect in the original publication and the corrected version is updated here.
Article
Full-text available
Males of the bushcricket Metrioptera roeselii bear paired titillators that are spiny genital structures supposedly functioning as copulatory courtship devices. During copulation, the male inserts its titillators into the female's genital chamber, where they rhythmically tap on the sensilla-covered dorsal surface of the genital fold. Here, we invest...
Conference Paper
Acoustic communication is based on amplitude and frequency modulation of sound signals. Temporal features of the signal require processing by central auditory neurons, the brain circuits, however that detect temporal features are poorly understood. We show how five neurons in the brain of female field crickets form an auditory feature-detector circ...
Article
Full-text available
From mammals to insects, acoustic communication is in many species crucial for successful reproduction. In the duetting bushcricket Ancylecha fenestrata, the mutual acoustic communication between males and females is asymmetrical. We investigated how those signalling disparities are reflected by sexual dimorphism of their ears. Both sexes have tymp...
Presentation
Adaptive radiations are major drivers of diversification which are triggered by novel ecological opportunities or opening of new niches due to innovations of variable traits, including key features of communication systems. For example, groups of animals that communicate using a particular type of signal that is not used by other species or not det...
Poster
In field crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus), the brain receives auditory input from two ascending neurons; AN1 is sharply tuned to the low-frequency (5 kHz) calling song of the males and controls positive phonotaxis, whereas AN2 triggers negative phonotaxis and is tuned to high- frequency sounds like predatory bat calls. In one group of crickets (Eneop...
Presentation
Katydids stridulate with their forewings to produce species-specific acoustic communication signals for mate attraction. In the subfamily of Phaneropterinae the strategy of acoustic duetting between males and females is very common and this mutual signaling can be asymmetrical as the females independently evolved their own wing structures for strid...
Article
Full-text available
Convergent evolution has led to surprising functional and mechanistic similarities between the vertebrate cochlea and some katydid ears [1,2] . Here we report on an ‘auditory fovea’ ( Figure 1 A) in the duetting katydid Ancylecha fenestrata (Tettigoniidae). The auditory fovea is a specialized inner-ear region with a disproportionate number of recep...
Article
Full-text available
Mechanoelectrical transduction of acoustic signals is the fundamental process for hearing in all ears across the animal kingdom. Here, we performed in vivo laser-vibrometric and electrophysiological measurements at the transduction site in an insect ear (Mecopoda elongata) to relate the biomechanical tonotopy along the hearing organ to the frequenc...
Article
Full-text available
New communication signals can evolve by sensory exploitation if signaling taps into preexisting sensory biases in receivers [1 and 2]. For mate attraction, signals are typically similar to attractive environmental cues like food [3, 4, 5 and 6], which amplifies their attractiveness to mates, as opposed to aversive stimuli like predator cues. Female...
Article
Full-text available
From human language to birdsong and the chirps of insects, acoustic communication is based on amplitude and frequency modulation of sound signals. Whereas frequency processing starts at the level of the hearing organs, temporal features of the sound amplitude such as rhythms or pulse rates require processing by central auditory neurons. Besides sev...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The high-frequency hearing organ of bushcrickets – the crista acustica (CA) – is tonotopically organized. Details about the mechano-electrical transduction mechanisms within the sensory-cell complex, however, remain unknown. In the recent study, we investigated and compared the anatomical, mechanical and electrophysiological properties of the CA an...
Poster
Male field crickets sing to attract conspecific females and during aggressive encounters with rivals. The neuronal network that generates the singing motor pattern is located in the anterior abdominal neuromers (Schöneich & Hedwig 2011, 2012). This organization suggests that the singing pattern generator may have evolved from the ventilatory motor...
Article
Full-text available
The singing behavior of male crickets allows analyzing a central pattern generator (CPG) that was shaped by sexual selection for reliable production of species-specific communication signals. After localizing the essential ganglia for singing in Gryllus bimaculatus, we now studied the calling song CPG at the cellular level. Fictive singing was init...
Article
Full-text available
The neural mechanisms underlying cricket singing behavior have been the focus of several studies, but the central pattern generator (CPG) for singing has not been localized conclusively. To test if the abdominal ganglia contribute to the singing motor pattern and to analyze if parts of the singing CPG are located in these ganglia, we systematically...
Article
Full-text available
Crickets use their long antennae as tactile sensors. Confronted with obstacles, conspecifics, or predators, antennal contacts trigger short-latency motor responses. To reveal the neuronal pathway underlying these antennal-guided locomotory reactions we identified descending interneurons that rapidly transmit antennal-tactile information from the he...
Poster
Auditory mate or prey localisation is central to the lifestyle of many animals and requires adequate directional hearing. However, when the incident angle of sound approaches 0° azimuth, interaural time and intensity differences gradually vanish. This poses a demanding challenge to animals especially when interaural distances are small. To cope wit...
Article
Full-text available
Auditory mate or prey localisation is central to the lifestyle of many animals and requires precise directional hearing. However, when the incident angle of sound approaches 0° azimuth, interaural time and intensity differences gradually vanish. This poses a demanding challenge to animals especially when interaural distances are small. To cope with...

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