Stefaan W Verbruggen

Stefaan W Verbruggen
The University of Sheffield | Sheffield · Department of Mechanical Engineering

PhD Biomedical Engineering

About

26
Publications
11,516
Reads
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576
Citations
Introduction
Dr Stefaan Verbruggen is a Lecturer in Biomechanics in the Insigneo Institute for in silico Medicine at the University of Sheffield. Dr Verbruggen’s research focuses on musculoskeletal & metastasis mechanobiology. Dr Verbruggen conducted his PhD research at the National University of Ireland Galway, followed by postdoctoral research at Imperial College London. Most recently, Stefaan completed a Marie Curie Fellowship at Queen Mary University of London and at Columbia University, New York.
Additional affiliations
July 2020 - present
The University of Sheffield
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Dr Verbruggen is a Lecturer in Biomechanics in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and a Principal Investigator at the INSIGNEO Institute for in silico Medicine, at the University of Sheffield. A biomedical engineer from Ireland, Stefaan applies state-of-the-art computational and experimental engineering techniques to solve medical problems in the human body, with a focus on the musculoskeletal system and metastatic cancer.
January 2018 - June 2020
Queen Mary, University of London
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Dr Verbruggen is a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research Fellow at Queen Mary University. Currently based at Columbia University, Dr Verbruggen’s research focuses on the mechanobiology of cancer, and how it metastasises to bone from other areas of the body.
January 2018 - June 2019
Columbia University
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Dr Verbruggen is a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research Fellow at Queen Mary University. Currently based at Columbia University, Dr Verbruggen’s research focuses on the mechanobiology of cancer, and how it metastasises to bone from other areas of the body.
Education
October 2010 - September 2013
National University of Ireland, Galway
Field of study
  • Biomedical Engineering
September 2005 - August 2009
National University of Ireland, Galway
Field of study
  • Biomedical Engineering

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Skeletal fragility in the elderly does not simply result from a loss of bone mass. However, the mechanisms underlying the concurrent decline in bone mass, quality, and mechanosensitivity with age remain unclear. The important role of osteocytes in these processes and the age-related degeneration of the intricate lacunocanalicular network (LCN) in w...
Article
Full-text available
Breast and prostate cancers preferentially metastasise to bone tissue, with metastatic lesions forming in the skeletons of most patients. On arriving in bone tissue, disseminated tumour cells enter a mechanical microenvironment that is substantially different to that of the primary tumour and is largely regulated by bone cells. Osteocytes, the most...
Article
Full-text available
Fetal kicking and movements generate biomechanical stimulation in the fetal skeleton, which is important for prenatal musculoskeletal development, particularly joint shape. Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is the most common joint shape abnormality at birth, with many risk factors for the condition being associated with restricted fetal mov...
Book
Mechanobiology in Health and Disease brings together contributions from leading biologists, clinicians, physicists and engineers in one convenient volume, providing a unified source of information for researchers in this highly multidisciplinary area. Opening chapters provide essential background information on cell mechanotransduction and essentia...
Article
Full-text available
Fetal kicking and movements generate biomechanical stimulation in the fetal skeleton, which is important for prenatal musculoskeletal development, particularly joint shape. Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is the most common joint shape abnormality at birth, with many risk factors for the condition being associated with restricted fetal mov...
Article
Full-text available
Mechanical forces generated by fetal kicks and movements result in stimulation of the fetal skeleton in the form of stress and strain. This stimulation is known to be critical for prenatal musculoskeletal development; indeed, abnormal or absent movements have been implicated in multiple congenital disorders. However, the mechanical stress and strai...
Chapter
Bone demonstrates a remarkable ability to renew itself, adapt its architecture, and repair fractures to maintain strength throughout life. Mechanobiology, the study of how external mechanical loading on the bone is transferred to bone cells and transduced into a biochemical cascade that ultimately results in macroscopic changes in bone structure, i...
Chapter
Lying at the intersection between engineering and biology, mechanobiology is a nascent field of study that investigates adaptation of the structure and behavior of tissues in response to mechanical loading. While mechanobiology has been implicated in a range of diseases and evidence of its effects is strewn across multiple scales, it is ultimately...
Article
The human pelvis has evolved over time into a remarkable structure, optimised into an intricate architecture that transfers the entire load of the upper body into the lower limbs, while also facilitating bipedal movement. The pelvic girdle is composed of two hip bones, os coxae, themselves each formed from the gradual fusion of the ischium, ilium a...
Article
Full-text available
The fetal membrane surrounds the fetus during pregnancy and is a thin tissue composed of two layers, the chorion and the amnion. While rupture of this membrane normally occurs at term, preterm rupture can result in increased risk of fetal mortality and morbidity, as well as danger of infection in the mother. Although structural changes have been ob...
Article
Full-text available
Mechanobiology, the study of the influence of mechanical loads on biological processes through signaling to cells, is fundamental to the inherent ability of bone tissue to adapt its structure in response to mechanical stimulation. The immense contribution of computational modeling to the nascent field of bone mechanobiology is indisputable, having...
Article
Full-text available
Fetal movements in the uterus are a natural part of development and are known to play an important role in normal musculoskeletal development. However, very little is known about the biomechanical stimuli that arise during movements in utero, despite these stimuli being crucial to normal bone and joint formation. Therefore, the objective of this st...
Article
studies have shown that primary osteoporosis caused by oestrogen-deficiency results in localised alterations in bone tissue properties and mineral composition. Additionally, changes to the lacunar-canalicular architecture surrounding the mechanosensitive osteocyte have been observed in animal models of the disease. Recently, it has also been demons...
Article
Alterations in bone tissue composition during osteoporosis likely disrupt the mechanical environment of bone cells and may thereby initiate a mechanobiological response. It has proved challenging to characterize the mechanical environment of bone cells in vivo, and the mechanical environment of osteoporotic bone cells is not known. The objective of...
Article
Full-text available
Load-induced fluid flow acts as an important biophysical signal for bone cell mechanotransduction in vivo, where the mechanical environment is thought to be monitored by integrin and primary cilia mechanoreceptors on the cell body. However, precisely how integrin- and primary cilia-based mechanosensors interact with the surrounding fluid flow stimu...
Article
Bone continuously adapts its internal structure to accommodate the functional demands of its mechanical environment. This process is orchestrated by a network of mechanosensitive osteocytes that respond to external mechanical signals and recruit osteoblasts and osteoclasts to alter bone mass to meet loading demands. Because of the irregular hierarc...
Thesis
Full-text available
The osteocyte is believed to act as the primary sensor of mechanical stimulus in bone, controlling signalling for bone growth and resorption in response to changes in the mechanical demands placed on bones throughout life. Alterations in local bone tissue composition and structure arising during osteoporosis likely disrupt the local mechanical envi...
Article
Full-text available
Osteocytes are believed to be the primary sensor of mechanical stimuli in bone, which orchestrate osteoblasts and osteoclasts to adapt bone structure and composition to meet physiological loading demands. Experimental studies to quantify the mechanical environment surrounding bone cells are challenging, and as such, computational and theoretical ap...
Conference Paper
Bone is an adaptive material, which is particularly responsive to mechanical loading and can adapt its mass and structure to meet the mechanical demands experienced throughout life. The osteocyte, due to its ubiquitous presence throughout bone, is believed to act as the main sensor of mechanical stimulus in bone, recruiting other cells to control b...
Article
Full-text available
The osteocyte is believed to act as the main sensor of mechanical stimulus in bone, controlling signalling for bone growth and resorption in response to changes in the mechanical demands placed on our bones throughout life. However, the precise mechanical stimuli that bone cells experience in vivo are not yet fully understood. The objective of this...

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