Stanislaw Karpinski

Stanislaw Karpinski
Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW | SGGW · Department of Plant Genetics, Breeding and Biotechnology

Professor

About

196
Publications
40,914
Reads
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9,276
Citations
Introduction
I am working on biophysical, molecular, physiological and cellular mechanisms, which are involved in processing of absorbed excessive light energy by photosystems II and I into electrophysiological, redox and hormonal signals that in consequence regulate plant stress responses and growth. Knowledge about these mechanisms and processes may lead to the new innovative biotechnologies for amelioration of plant growth and health under multi-variable environmental conditions.
Additional affiliations
April 2009 - present
Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Laureate of the first WELCOME program of the Foundation for Polish Science, PI
January 2004 - December 2007
Polish Academy of Sciences
March 2001 - February 2004
Umeå Plant Science Centre
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
January 1989 - May 1994
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Field of study
  • trees molecular and cell biology
October 1979 - June 1984
Poznań University of Life Sciences
Field of study
  • Agriculture, biochemistry and molecular biology

Publications

Publications (196)
Article
Full-text available
One sentence summary: A new type of plant-to-plant direct communication involving electrical signaling, reactive oxygen species, and photosystem networks is revealed. ABSTRACT Systemic acquired acclimation and wound signaling require the transmission of electrical, calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) signals between local and systemic tissues...
Article
Full-text available
Systemic acquired acclimation and wound signaling require the transmission of electrical, calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) signals between local and systemic tissues of the same plant. However, whether such signals can be transmitted between two different plants is largely unknown. Here, we reveal a new type of plant-to-plant aboveground d...
Article
Full-text available
Stomatal movement and density influence plant water use efficiency and thus biomass production. Studies in model plants within controlled environments suggest MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE4 (MPK4) may be crucial for stomatal regulation. We present functional analysis of MPK4 for hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides) grown under natural fi...
Article
Full-text available
Because of their sessile nature, plants evolved integrated defense and acclimation mechanisms to simultaneously cope with adverse biotic and abiotic conditions. Among these are systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). Growing evidence suggests that SAR and SAA activate similar cellular mechanisms and employ common...
Article
Full-text available
Salicylic acid (SA) is well known hormonal molecule involved in cell death regulation. In response to a broad range of environmental factors (e.g., high light, UV, pathogens attack), plants accumulate SA, which participates in cell death induction and spread in some foliar cells. LESION SIMULATING DISEASE 1 (LSD1) is one of the best-known cell deat...
Article
Full-text available
The concentration of selected heavy metals: chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) in 5-year-old wood of Populus trichocarpa before and after steam explosion (SE) and liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatments was studied. The concentration of the above heavy metals in the liquid fraction obtained after pretreatm...
Article
Full-text available
mRNA secondary structure influences translation. Proteins that modulate the mRNA secondary structure around the translation initiation region may regulate translation in plastids. To test this hypothesis, we exposed Arabidopsis thaliana to high light, which induces translation of psbA mRNA encoding the D1 subunit of photosystem II. We assayed trans...
Article
Full-text available
Phototropins are plasma membrane-associated photoreceptors of blue light and UV-A/B radiation. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes two phototropins, PHOT1 and PHOT2, that mediate phototropism, chloroplast positioning, and stomatal opening. They are well characterized in terms of photomorphogenetic processes, but so far, little was known about t...
Article
Full-text available
Cell death is the ultimate end of a cell cycle that occurs in all living organisms during development or responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In the course of evolution, plants and animals evolve various molecular mechanisms to regulate cell death; however, some of them are conserved among both these kingdoms. It was found that mammalian proap...
Article
Chloroplast‐to‐nucleus retrograde signaling is essential for cell function, acclimation to fluctuating environmental conditions, plant growth and development. The vast majority of chloroplast proteins are nuclear‐encoded, and must be imported into the organelle after synthesis in the cytoplasm. This import is essential for the development of fully...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how cell organelles and compartments communicate with each other has always been an important field of knowledge widely explored by many researchers. However, despite years of investigations, one point—and perhaps the only point that many agree on—is that our knowledge about cellular-signaling pathways still requires expanding. Chloro...
Article
Full-text available
Regulation of light absorption under variable light conditions is essential to optimize photosynthetic and acclimatory processes in plants. Light energy absorbed in excess has a damaging effect on chloroplasts and can lead to cell death. Therefore, plants have evolved protective mechanisms against excess excitation energy that include chloroplast a...
Article
Full-text available
The storage of maize seed intended for industrial purposes in foil silo bags is associated with microbiological contamination of the material by bacteria and fungi. This results in the loss of a part of the raw material or its deterioration and causes financial losses. In this paper, the relationship between the number of microorganisms colonizing...
Preprint
Full-text available
mRNA secondary structure influences translation. Proteins that modulate the mRNA secondary structure around the translation initiation region may regulate translation in plastids. To test this hypothesis, we exposed Arabidopsis thaliana to high light, which induces translation of psbA mRNA encoding the D1 subunit of photosystem II. We assayed trans...
Article
It is well known that PsbS is a key protein for the proper management of excessive energy in plants. Plants without PsbS cannot trigger non‐photochemical quenching, which is crucial for optimal photosynthesis under variable conditions. Our studies showed wild‐type plants had enhanced tolerance to UV‐C‐induced cell death (CD) upon induction of light...
Preprint
Full-text available
Chloroplast to nucleus retrograde signaling is essential for cell function, acclimation to fluctuating environmental conditions, plant growth and development. The vast majority of chloroplast proteins are nuclear-encoded and must be imported into the organelle after synthesis in the cytoplasm. This import is essential for the development of fully f...
Article
Full-text available
Lesion Simulating Disease 1 (LSD1), Enhanced Disease Susceptibility (EDS1) and Phytoalexin Deficient 4 (PAD4) were discovered a quarter century ago as regulators of programmed cell death and biotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Recent studies have demonstrated that these proteins are also required for acclimation responses to various ab...
Article
In Arabidopsis thaliana, LESION SIMULATING DISEASE 1 (LSD1), ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 (EDS1), and PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 (PAD4) proteins are regulators of cell death in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. Hormones, such as salicylic acid (SA), and reactive oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are key signaling molecules...
Article
Full-text available
Cyst-forming plant-parasitic nematodes are common pests of many crops. They inject secretions into host cells to induce the developmental and metabolic reprogramming that leads to the formation of a syncytium, which is the sole food source for growing nematodes. As in other host-parasite models, avirulence leads to rapid and local programmed cell d...
Article
In the natural environment, plants are exposed to a variety of biotic and abiotic stress conditions that trigger rapid changes in the production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The production and scavenging of ROS is compartmentalized, which means that, depending on stimuli type, they can be generated and eliminated in different ce...
Article
Full-text available
Many mRNAs contain pause sites that briefly interrupt the progress of translation. Specific features that induce ribosome pausing have been described; however, their individual contributions to pause-site formation, and the overall biological significance of ribosome pausing, remain largely unclear. We have taken advantage of the compact genome of...
Article
Full-text available
Electrical signaling in higher plants is required for the appropriate intracellular and intercellular communication, stress responses, growth and development. In this review, we have focus on recent findings regarding the electrical signaling, as a major regulator of the systemic acquired acclimation (SAA) and the systemic acquired resistance (SAR)...
Article
Since its discovery over two decades ago as an important cell death regulator in Arabidopsis thaliana, the role of LESION SIMULATING DISEASE 1 (LSD1) has been studied intensively within both biotic and abiotic stress responses as well as with respect to plant fitness regulation. However, its molecular mode of action remains enigmatic. Here we demon...
Article
Full-text available
In contrast to the function of reactive oxygen species, calcium, hormones and small RNAs in systemic signaling, systemic electrical signaling in plants is poorly studied and understood. Pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorescence imaging and surface electrical potential measurements accompanied by pharmacological treatments were employed to...
Article
P7-14Incorporation of inorganic nanostructures into the internalstructures ofArabidopsis thalianaMaria Lewandowska∗, M. Górecka, M. Bialasek, M.Sujkowska-Rybkowska, B. Dworakowska, S. KarpinskiWarsaw University of Life Sciences, PolandIncorporation of inorganic nanostructures into plant organelleshas the potential to enhance its functions. For exam...
Article
Full-text available
Phytohormones and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are major determinants of the regulation of development and stress responses in plants. During life cycle of these organisms, signaling networks of plant growth regulators and ROS interact in order to render an appropriate developmental and environmental response. In plant’s photosynthetic (e.g. leave...
Data
FIGURE 1 | The proposed model of action of LESION SIMULATING DISEASE 1 (LSD1), ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1–PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 (EDS1–PAD4) and other molecular regulators: (A) during seed germination in light, as well as in foliar tissues exposed to (B) optimal or (C) suboptimal conditions. LSD1 is a negative regulator of cell death and su...
Article
Full-text available
Natural capacity has evolved in higher plants to absorb and harness excessive light energy. In naive models the majority of absorbed photon energy is radiated back as fluorescence and heat. For years the photon sensor protein PsbS was considered to play a critical role in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of light absorbed by PSII antennas and in i...
Article
Full-text available
The systemic response of plants to pathogen infection (systemic acquired resistance [SAR]), or wounding has been extensively studied with a network of numerous compounds and signals implicated (for review, see Dempsey and Klessig, 2012; Shah and Zeier, 2013). In recent years a new type of systemic response, termed systemic acquired acclimation (SAA...
Article
Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) catalyse reversible interconversion of CO2 and water into bicarbonate and protons and regulate concentration of CO2 around photosynthetic enzymes. In higher plants the CAs are divided into three distinct classes α, β and γ, with members off each of them being involved in CO2 uptake, fixation or recycling. The most abundant...
Article
Full-text available
Key message: Arabidopsis and poplar with modified PAD4, LSD1 and EDS1 genes exhibit successful growth under drought stress. The acclimatory strategies depend on cell division/cell death control and altered cell wall composition. The increase of plant tolerance towards environmental stresses would open much opportunity for successful plant cultivat...
Article
Full-text available
Plants coordinate their responses to various biotic and abiotic stresses in order to optimize their developmental and acclimatory programmes. The ultimate response to an excessive amount of stress is local induction of cell death mechanisms. The death of certain cells can help to maintain tissue homeostasis and enable nutrient remobilization, thus...
Article
Full-text available
Cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs) are transmembrane proteins characterized by the presence of two domains of unknown function 26 (DUF26) in their ectodomain. The CRKs form one of the largest groups of receptor-like protein kinases in plants, but their biological functions have so far remained largely uncharacterized. We conducted a large-s...
Article
Full-text available
In plants, receptor-like protein kinases play essential roles in signal transduction by recognizing extracellular stimuli and activating the downstream signalling pathways. Cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs) constitute a large subfamily of receptor-like protein kinases, with 44 members in Arabidopsis thaliana. They are distinguished by the...
Article
As obligate photoautotrophs, plants are inevitably exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Because of stratospheric ozone depletion, UV has become more and more dangerous to the biosphere. Therefore, it is important to understand UV perception and signal transduction in plants. In the present study, we show that lesion simulating disease 1 (LSD1) an...
Article
Full-text available
Systemic acquired acclimation (SAA) is an important light acclimatory mechanism that depends on the global adjustments of non-photochemical quenching and chloroplast retrograde signaling. As the exact regulation of these processes is not known, we measured time-resolved fluorescence of chlorophyll a in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves exposed to excess...
Article
Full-text available
The PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 (PAD4) gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPAD4) is involved in the regulation of plant-pathogen interactions. The role of PAD4 in woody plants is not known, therefore, we characterised its function in hybrid aspen and its role in reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent signalling and wood development. Three independent tran...
Article
Full-text available
Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate signal transduction from different cellular compartments and from the extracellular environment to the nucleus in all eukaryotes. One of the best characterized MAPKs in Arabidopsis thaliana is MPK4, which was shown to be a negative regulator of systemic acquired resistance. The mpk4 mutant a...
Article
Full-text available
The rapid induction of the bundle sheath cell (BSC)-specific expression of ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE2 (APX2) in high light (HL)-exposed leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana is, in part, regulated by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) produced by vascular parenchyma cells. In this study, we provide more details of the ABA signalling that regulates APX2 expression...
Data
Full-text available
Water use efficiency (WUE) is a quantitative measurement of how much biomass or yield is produced per amount of water used. It is an important physiological factor for agriculture, especially in areas with a limited accessibility of water. It is also crucial in a better understanding of drought tolerance and drought resistance. The most common meth...
Article
As obligate photoautotrophs, plants are inevitably exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Because of stratospheric ozone depletion, UV has become more and more dangerous to the biosphere. Therefore, it is important to understand UV perception and signal transduction in plants. In the present study we show that LESION SIMULATING DISEASE 1 (LSD1) and...
Article
Full-text available
Isochorismate synthase 1 (ICS1) is a crucial enzyme in the salicylic acid (SA) synthesis pathway, and thus it is important for immune defences. The ics1 mutant is used in experiments on plant–pathogen interactions, and ICS1 is required for the appropriate hypersensitive disease defence response. However, ICS1 also takes part in the synthesis of phy...
Article
Full-text available
One of the largest groups of recept or-like protein kinases (RLKs) are the CYSTEINE-RICH RLKs (CRKs) with 44 members in Arabidopsis. CRK expression is regulated in response to variou s stresses that lead to specific alter- ations in ROS metabolism (Wrzaczek et al., 2010). CRKs are characterized by conserved cy steine motifs in the ecto- domain pote...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate signals transduction from different cellular compartments and from the extracellular environment to the nucleus in all eukaryotes. One of the best characterized MAPKs in Arabidopsis thaliana is MPK4 which was shown to be a negative regulator of the systemic acquired resistance. mpk4 mutant a...
Conference Paper
LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (LSD1) is a negative regulator of cell death in response to diverse stresses, both biotic and abiotic. Under nonpermissive conditions the Arabidopsis thaliana lsd1 mutant initiates a ROS-dependent uncontrolled spread of cell death. Therefore, LSD1 was suggested to act as ROS rheostat preventing the pro-death pathway below...