Stacy A. Krueger-Hadfield

Stacy A. Krueger-Hadfield
University of Alabama at Birmingham | UAB · Department of Biology

PhD

About

64
Publications
21,211
Reads
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752
Citations
Introduction
I am a molecular ecologist interested in population structure and mating systems. In particular, I use micro- and macroalgal models to address questions in evolutionary ecology, such as the maintenance of haploid-diploid life cycles. I just started as an Assistant Professor at UAB where I am revisiting some old friends and starting to delve into new frontiers on the molecular side of evolutionary ecology.
Additional affiliations
June 2013 - present
College of Charleston
Position
  • PostDoc Position
June 2012 - May 2013
Marine Biological Association of the UK
Position
  • Post-doctoral researcher and Collaborator
Description
  • I am continuing this collaborative project which began during my post-doctoral research at the MBA.
November 2011 - May 2013
Marine Biological Association of the UK
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
October 2008 - October 2011
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
Field of study
  • Marine Molecular Ecology
October 2008 - October 2011
Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6 - Station Biologique de Roscoff
Field of study
  • Marine Molecular Ecology
August 2006 - May 2008
California State University, Northridge
Field of study
  • Marine Biology

Publications

Publications (64)
Preprint
Invasive species can successfully and rapidly colonize new niches and expand ranges via founder effects and enhanced tolerance towards environmental stresses. However, the underpinning molecular mechanisms (i.e., gene expression changes) facilitating rapid adaptation to harsh environments are still poorly understood. The red seaweed Gracilaria verm...
Article
Full-text available
Many species introduced to non-native regions undergo profound phenotypic change, but conflicting evidence remains on the frequency of such trait differentiation. Here, we describe two phenotype categories—biomechanical material properties and organismal size—that differ between and within native Japanese and non-native North America and Europe sho...
Article
Full-text available
Novel facultative mutualisms that develop between native and non-native ecosystem engineers can lead to the retention of the non-native partner. In some cases, behavior plays an additional, but less understood, role in the development and persistence of mutualisms. In soft-sediment marine habitats along the western Atlantic, the native decorator wo...
Article
Full-text available
Whereas fungal symbionts of terrestrial plants are among the most widespread and well-studied symbioses, relatively little is known about fungi that are associated with macroalgae. To fill the gap in marine fungal taxonomy, we combined simple culture methods with amplicon sequencing to characterize the fungal communities associated with three brown...
Article
Full-text available
Complex life cycles, in which discrete life stages of the same organism differ in form or function and often occupy different ecological niches, are common in nature. Because stages share the same genome, selective effects on one stage may have cascading consequences through the entire life cycle. Theoretical and empirical studies have not yet gene...
Article
Single‐gene markers, such as the mitochondrial cox1, microsatellites, and single nucleotide polymorphisms are powerful methods to describe diversity within and among taxonomic groups and characterize phylogeographic patterns. Large repositories of publicly‐available, molecular data can be combined to generate and evaluate evolutionary hypotheses fo...
Article
Partial clonality is known to affect the genetic composition and evolutionary trajectory of diplontic (single, free-living diploid stage) populations. However, many partially clonal eukaryotes exhibit life cycles in which somatic development occurs in both haploid and diploid individuals (haplodiplontic life cycles). Here, we studied how haplodiplo...
Article
The genomic variation of an invasive species may be affected by complex demographic histories and evolutionary changes during the invasion. Here, we describe the relative influence of bottlenecks, clonality, and population expansion in determining genomic variability of the widespread red macroalga Agarophyton vermiculophyllum. Its introduction fro...
Article
Partially clonality is an incredibly common reproductive mode found across all the major eukaryotic lineages. Yet, population genetic theory is based on exclusive sexuality or exclusive asexuality, and partial clonality is often ignored. This is particularly true in haplodiplontic eukaryotes, including algae, ferns, mosses, and fungi, where somatic...
Article
Ecological and evolutionary processes differ depending on how genetic diversity is organized in space. For clonal organisms, the organization of both genetic and genotypic diversity can influence the fitness effects of competition, the mating system, and reproductive mode, which are key drivers of life cycle evolution. Understanding how individual...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species are co-introduced with microbiota from their native range and also interact with microbiota found in the novel environment to which they are introduced. Host flexibility toward microbiota, or host promiscuity , is an important trait underlying terrestrial plant invasions. To test whether host promiscuity may be important in macroal...
Article
Organisms across the tree of life have complex life cycles that include both sexual and asexual reproduction or that are obligately asexual. These organisms include ecologically dominant species that structure many terrestrial and marine ecosystems, as well as many pathogens, pests, and invasive species. We must consider both the evolution and main...
Article
Theoretical ecological models, such as succession and facilitation, were defined in terrestrial habitats, and subsequently applied to marine and freshwater habitats in intertidal and then subtidal realms. One such model is the soil seed bank, defined as all viable seeds (or fruits) found near the soil surface that facilitate community restoration/r...
Article
For many taxa, including isomorphic haplodiplontic macroalgae, determining sex and ploidy is challenging, thereby limiting the scope of some population demographic and genetic studies. Here, we used double digest restriction site‐associated DNA sequencing (ddRAD‐seq) to identify sex‐linked molecular markers in the widespread red alga Agarophyton ve...
Data
The AdjustaDepth TechnoEconomic Analysis was prepared by Mark E. Capron PE, Co-PI, under the direction of Kelly Lucas, PhD, PI and submitted April 3, 2019 to U.S. Department of Energy ARPA-E under Phase 1 Contract DE-AR0000916. Its 33 tabs present the cost and yield projections for growing Gracilaria tikvahiae in the Gulf of Mexico. It can be adapt...
Article
Full-text available
Species concepts formalize evolutionary and ecological processes, but often conflict with one another when considering the mechanisms that ultimately lead to species delimitation. Evolutionary biologists are, however, recognizing that the conceptualization of a species is separate and distinct from the delimitation of species. Indeed, if species ar...
Article
Full-text available
Chondrus crispus is a marine red alga with sulfated galactans, called carrageenans, in its extracellular matrix. Chondrus has a complex haplodiplontic life cycle, alternating between male and female gametophytes (n) and tetrasporophytes (2n). The Chondrus life cycle stages are isomorphic; however, a major phenotypic difference is that carrageenan c...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Kelp forests worldwide are important marine ecosystems that foster high primary to secondary productivity and multiple ecosystem services. These ecosystems are increasingly under threat from extreme storms, changing ocean temperatures, harvesting, and greater herbivore pressure at regional and global scales, necessitating urgent documentation o...
Article
Full-text available
Communities are shaped by scale dependent processes. To study the diversity and variation of microbial communities across scales, the invasive and widespread seaweed Agarophyton vermiculophyllum presents a unique opportunity. We characterized pro‐ and eukaryotic communities associated with this holobiont across its known distribution range, which s...
Article
Worldwide, kelp populations are stressed by warming, increased storms and other anthropogenic disturbances. Marine population distributions are projected to retreat poleward with climate change if they cannot adapt to changing conditions, which would potentially lead to a regime shift in subtidal habitats. In Northern Europe, Laminaria hyperborea i...
Article
Worldwide, macroalgae have invaded near‐shore marine ecosystems. However, their haplodiplontic life cycles have complicated efforts to predict patterns of growth and spread, particularly since most theoretical predictions are derived from diplontic taxa (i.e., animals). To complete one revolution of the life cycle, two separate ploidy stages, often...
Article
Full-text available
Inbreeding is a potent evolutionary force shaping the distribution of genetic variation within and among populations of plants and animals. Yet, our understanding of the forces shaping the expression and evolution of non‐random mating in general, and inbreeding in particular, remains remarkably incomplete. Most research on plant mating systems focu...
Article
Full-text available
Biological invasions represent grave threats to terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems, but our understanding of the role of evolution during invasions remains rudimentary. In marine environments, macroalgae account for a large percentage of invaders, but their complicated life cycles render it difficult to move methodologies and predictions w...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Background During a biodiversity survey of Béal an Mhuirthead, Co. Mayo, a small population of Laminaria ochroleuca Bachelot de Pylaie was discovered in a semi-protected cove on the northwest part of the headland among a mixed macroalgal assemblage including the kelps Laminaria digitata and Saccharina latissima. This is the first record of...
Article
Full-text available
Clonal behavior has been hypothesized to provide an escape from allometric metabolic scaling that limits the maximum mass achieved by a single individual. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of a wide-spread, non-native sea anemone to buffer its colony biomass accumulation rate across environments by modulating ramet body size through environmentally...
Article
Pigment variation within and among algal species may have important ecological consequences because small changes in the concentration and composition of pigments can influence the photosynthetic efficiency and rate as well as the spectra of light utilized. Toward the goal of developing a rapid method for comparing pigment composition among algal t...
Article
Studies in ecological and community genetics have advanced our understanding of the role of intraspecific diversity in structuring communities and ecosystems. However, in near‐shore marine communities, these studies have mostly been restricted to seagrasses, marsh plants, and oysters. Yet, macroalgae are critically important ecosystem engineers in...
Article
Full-text available
p>This paper represents the third contribution in the Genera of Phytopathogenic Fungi (GOPHY) series. The series provides morphological descriptions, information about the pathology, distribution, hosts and disease symptoms for the treated genera, as well as primary and secondary DNA barcodes for the currently accepted species included in these. Th...
Technical Report
Full-text available
AdjustaDepth Project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy to design an artificial reef system for growing and harvesting seaweed for advanced sustainable biofuels. The team discovered that the system grows more seaweed per hectare when it is part of a complete ecosystem with shellfish, finfish, and...
Article
Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss, 1967 is a red alga native to the northwest Pacific, but over the last 100 years, this ecosystem engineer has invaded estuaries throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Despite previous studies documenting populations in estuarine habitats in British Columbia, California, and Baja California, our knowledge of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The US Department of Energy Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) MacroAlgae Research Inspiring Novel Energy Research (MARINER) program is encouraging technologies for the sustainable harvest of large funding research of macroalgae for biofuels at less than $80 per dry metric ton (DMT). The Ocean Forests team, led by the University of S...
Article
Full-text available
Theory predicts that the maintenance of haplodiplontic life cycles requires ecological differences between the haploid gametophytes and diploid sporophytes, yet evidence of such differences remain scarce. The haplodiplontic red seaweed Gracilaria vermiculophylla has invaded the temperate estuaries of the Northern Hemisphere, where it commonly modif...
Article
Flora marina Antarctica: patrimonio de biodiversidad Iván Gómez Ocampo Ediciones Kultrún, Valdivia, Chile, 2015. ISBN: 978-956-344-058-4, 243 pp. [To purchase, contact Dr Humberto E. Gonzalez at hgonzale@uach.cl] - Stacy A. Krueger-Hadfield
Article
Full-text available
Generalist consumers potentially limit introduced prey populations when they are willing and able to consume those prey, but because generalist consumers vary in feeding preference, they are not equally effective in resisting invasions. Previous work suggested that during the introduction of the red seaweed Gracilaria vermiculophylla to North Ameri...
Article
Full-text available
Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss, 1967 is a red alga native to the northwest Pacific, but over the last 100 years, this ecosystem engineer has invaded estuaries throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Despite previous studies documenting populations in estuarine habitats in British Columbia, California, and Baja California, our knowledge of...
Article
Our knowledge of non-native algae in benthic estuarine habitats is relatively poor, especially compared to algal introductions along open shores or on floating structures. Gracilaria vermiculophylla is a widespread macroalgal invader in the temperate estuaries of the Northern Hemisphere, and, here, we expand its documented range within northeastern...
Article
Full-text available
The susceptibility of native and non-native populations of the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla to fouling was compared in common garden experiments. Native and non-native algae were enclosed into dialysis membrane tubes, and the tubes were exposed to natural fouling. Fouling on the outside of the tubes was mediated by chemical compounds excrete...
Article
The identification of native sources and vectors of introduced species informs their ecological and evolutionary history and may guide policies that seek to prevent future introductions. Population genetics provides a powerful set of tools to identify origins and vectors. However, these tools can mislead when the native range is poorly sampled or f...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic sequence data allows for the identification of previously imperceptible cryptic species. Cryptic species are common in algae that have few morphologically distinguishable features. Identifying cryptic species with asexual life cycles requires consideration of whether the biology of the algae meets the assumptions of the analysis used to del...
Article
Full-text available
The delimitation of species in the Gracilariales is often difficult due to the lack of diagnostic morphologicalcharacters. As aresult, non-native species are often misidentified without the use of moleculartools. Recently, studies have investigated the agar quality of the dominant gracilarioids pecies in the Laguna San Ignacio in Baja Califronia Su...
Preprint
The source and vector of an introduced species inform its ecological and evolutionary history and may guide management that seeks to prevent future introductions. Surprisingly, few studies have successfully used genetic tools to independently inform the specific source and pathway of biological invasions. The ecological history of many introduced s...
Article
Baker's Law predicts uniparental reproduction will facilitate colonization success in novel habitats. While evidence supports this prediction among colonizing plants and animals, few studies have investigated shifts in reproductive mode in haplo-diplontic species in which both prolonged haploid and diploid stages separate meiosis and fertilization...
Article
Understanding a species’ basic ecology and natural history, such as population dynamics and demography, is key to understanding the evolutionary potential of a population. This information, with a particular emphasis on connectivity and mating patterns, has long been lacking for haploid-diploid organisms in general, but particularly for macroalgal...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem engineers alter local community structure and ecosystem functioning, and these impacts can be magnified when engineer populations are genetically diverse. Introduced populations typically have lower genetic diversity, which in theory constrains the positive effect of genetic diversity on ecosystem functioning. We tested for genetic divers...
Article
Full-text available
Microsatellite loci are popular molecular markers due to their resolution in distinguishing individual genotypes. However, they have rarely been used to explore the population dynamics in species with biphasic life cycles in which both haploid and diploid stages develop into independent, functional organisms. We developed microsatellite loci for th...
Article
Full-text available
The link between life history traits and mating systems in diploid organisms has been extensively addressed in the literature, whereas the degree of selfing and/or inbreeding in natural populations of haploid-diploid organisms, in which haploid gametophytes alternate with diploid sporophytes, has been rarely measured. Dioecy has often been used as...
Chapter
Chondrus crispus, or Irish moss, is a common edible red seaweed that can be found on rocky shores in the Northern Atlantic. The cell wall contains carrageenan and C. crispus is the original source of this commercially used thickener. Because of the ecological and economic importance of this red alga a relatively important research literature exists...
Article
Full-text available
Due to the unprecedented rate at which our climate is changing, the ultimate consequence for many species is likely to be either extinction or migration to an alternate habitat. Certain species might, however, evolve at a rate that could make them resilient to the effects of a rapidly changing environment. This scenario is most likely to apply to s...
Article
Full-text available
Due to the unprecedented rate at which our climate is changing, the ultimate consequence for many species is likely to be either extinction or migration to an alternate habitat. Certain species might, however, evolve at a rate that could make them resilient to the effects of a rapidly changing environment. This scenario is most likely to apply to s...
Article
Species with sexual and asexual life cycles may exhibit intraspecific differences in reproductive effort. The spatial separation of sexual and asexual lineages, called geographic parthenogenesis, is common in plants, animals and algae. Mastocarpus papillatus is a well-documented case of geographic parthenogenesis in which sexuals dominate southern...
Article
Understanding how abiotic factors influence the spatial distribution of genetic variation provides insight into microevolutionary processes. The intertidal seascape is characterized by highly heterogeneous habitats which probably influence the partitioning of genetic variation at very small scales. The effects of tidal height on genetic variation i...
Article
Chondrus crispus Stackh. has been intensely studied, yet no study to date has elucidated its population structure or mating system despite many populations in which there was a haploid bias and lack of male gametophytes. Therefore, 12 nuclear microsatellite loci were identified in this red alga. Microsatellite markers were developed and tested agai...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies of hydrozoans suggest that metabolic factors associated with the physiology of gastrovascular fluid transport play a role in regulating morphogenetic development of colonies. In that context, the objective of this study was to develop a system to experimentally control diets of hydrozoans in culture that could be used to test effects...

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
This NSF-funded RCN-UBE project seeks to create a network of educational specialists (who study how students learn) and scientists (who are active researchers and educators) to develop assessment tools that directly measure what students learn about experimentation in biology through undergraduate research and classroom experiences. Collaboratively, these two groups developed a set of Basic Competencies of Biological Experimentation (see http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/pibergiim/4) about the concepts underlying an experiment and the nature of representations students should apply in reasoning about experiments and visualizing data. The project is focused on revealing areas of student difficulties, leading to new instructional and mentoring approaches targeting those areas. The broader impacts of the project lie in the fact that faculty participants in this network come from a variety of biology sub-disciplines, are at different career levels, and come from a wide range of institutions. The project is providing an opportunity for faculty from liberal arts colleges, masters-degree-granting institutions, and major research institutions, working together, to provide input to the development of assessments that can positively impact their students. As a key outcome, the common standards and assessments will be used across multiple institutions and disciplines of biology. Here is a link to the NSF project summary: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1346567. This project is funded jointly by the NSF Directorate for Biological Sciences and the Directorate of Education and Human Resources, Division of Undergraduate Education in support of efforts to address the challenges posed in the Vision and Change in Undergraduate Education: A Call to Action report.
Project
Aquatic primary producers like kelp provide essential habitats and ecosystem services for coastal communities. In Ireland very little is known about community dynamics within kelp forests and how the ecophysiological characteristics of the kelp species may structure or function in these dynamics. This project aims to describe population structure and biodiversity of kelp forests along the west coast of Ireland.