Stacy Hackner

Stacy Hackner
University College London | UCL · Institute of Archaeology

PhD Bioarchaeology

About

7
Publications
1,129
Reads
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4
Citations
Citations since 2016
3 Research Items
4 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220.00.51.01.52.0
20162017201820192020202120220.00.51.01.52.0
Introduction
I investigate differences in cross-sectional geometry and geometric morphometrics of the human tibia in Meroitic through Medieval Nubia (Sudan), comparing groups of varying subsistence strategy for social and sexual divisions of labor and activity.
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - March 2016
Birkbeck, University of London
Position
  • Lecturer
September 2014 - December 2014
University College London
Position
  • Practicals Instructor - Human Skull (MSc)
September 2014 - December 2017
University College London
Position
  • Discussion Tutor - Migration & Health (BASc)
Description
  • Tutor and discussion leader for two sections.
Education
September 2010 - September 2011
University College London
Field of study
  • Bioarchaeology
September 2006 - June 2010
University of Chicago
Field of study
  • Anthropology

Publications

Publications (7)
Conference Paper
The growing human tibia is uniquely responsive to repeated activities, resulting in identifiable morphological patterns that can be applied to ancient populations. Much of the bioarchaeological research in this area focuses on the transition to agriculture, noting a decline in bone strength and robusticity with increasing levels of sedentism. Howev...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The study of activity in bioarchaeology uses cross-sectional bone shape and robusticity to examine patterns uniting or dividing archaeological groups. Numerous studies of activity change over time have examined female and male skeletons and came to one conclusion: while the skeletons of males changed significantly, the skeletons of females didn’t....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recording guidelines for human skeletal remains instruct researchers to measure anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters of long bones at varying points on the shaft. However, these points differ based on the bone and the resulting measurements can vary depending on the observer. Of particular concern is the platycnemic index, which compares diam...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
his study examines differences in midshaft tibial shaft shape between assemblages of ancient human remains from the Meroitic through medieval periods in northern Sudan. The shape of the tibial midshaft has been shown to be responsive to changes in physical activity; in particular, variance in shape can be linked to specific types and directionality...
Article
Full-text available
Stacy Hackner describes her current research investigating the tibial diaphyseal mid-shaft shape among skeletal assemblages of ancient Nubians, who inhabited northern Sudan between 5,000 and 1000 years ago.
Data
Full-text available
This paper examines differences in diaphyseal tibial shape between assemblages of ancient human remains from northern Sudan. Athletics research in biomechanics demonstrates that the tibia responds to activity-related strain by increasing or decreasing periosteal bone, leading to differing diaphyseal shapes. Examining these differences in cortical s...
Data
In the course of bioarchaeological analysis of two Nubian assemblages from the Kerma Classique period sites of 4-L-2 and 4-L-100 (4th Cataract), my colleagues and I recorded that many individuals had oddly-shaped or platycnemic tibias. However, they were seriously degraded and damaged, so it was impossible to obtain most of the tibial standard meas...

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